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what are your sizes w/ that molding???
 

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I agree with Stick's determine about it being Q/S Fir, and very old due to the darkening of the end. A molder with special matching blades would be the best way to duplicate it. You can have blades ground to match to profile, but if you don't have a molder, you might be able to find a shop that can do the molding and even order the knives to make it for you.

For only 20 ft this is going to be very expensive molding. Perhaps a combination of using several different router bits in a router table can be used to make something close to this, but it will take experimenting and many passes to get it done. It might be cheaper and easier to just replace all of it with a stock molding.

Charley
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
The molding is for a historic property which needs to stay authentic.

The width of the molding is 5-1/2" [ie 1 by 6]

I was thinking it could be made in three pieces. The center piece cut bevels with a table saw and round over by hand with a plane. The side pieces can then be cut using the router table and standard bits.

Rod
 

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You can do that on a router table, but it's a bit tedious.
First, do the profile details on the sides of the center arc. You're drawing shows simple rabbets, but the picture looks like coves?

Once those are done, make a series of passes with a core box bit. Start with a 1/4" bit at the edges, and move the fence about 1/16 (or less) per pass, adjusting the depth of cut as required. When you get enough room, switch to a 1/2" core box bit. The larger diameter will give you a smoother finish, requiring less sanding.

This is the manual version of how I make custom mouldings on a CNC router. Exact small technique, just a different tool.
 

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Something I haven't tried ........ but couldn't a profile be made ........... and using the Tiling method .............. a ......... now hold on ........ I know it's a wild idea ......... a CNC put it out??
 

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Certainly. I do it all the time, mostly for curved mouldings.
But be prepared to pay a few hundred dollars for a commercial shop to do it.
 

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He needs one of our people close by him.
 
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One cheaper option would be to get a molding head for a table saw and get Corob Cutter to grind knives for it or get the straight jointing knives and do it yourself. If you get the right radius you could progressively work from the center out and just lift the head each time to match cuts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
rodlloyd

Something I haven't tried ........ but couldn't a profile be made ........... and using the Tiling method .............. a ......... now hold on ........ I know it's a wild idea ......... a CNC put it out??
I did not understand any of that
 

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The molding is for a historic property which needs to stay authentic.

The width of the molding is 5-1/2" [ie 1 by 6]

1... I was thinking it could be made in three pieces.

2... The center piece cut bevels with a table saw and round over by hand with a plane.

3... The side pieces can then be cut using the router table and standard bits.

Rod
1... Perfect!!! and yes it can... this method is called built up..

2... Radius plane or a convex thumbnail bit for rough in and a spoke shave to finish...
you may be able to find a convex edge bit of the right radii...

3... yes...
or use a cove/bead bit in a single piece in two passes and add the convex as an insert...
look to a ready made convex edge banding/molding for the insert...
 

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Stick - I'm surprised at you, with your intellect.

All I said was why couldn't that profile be made on a CNC, and using Aspire's tiling tool, which lets you make lengths longer than the bed as long as you have the material and space to handle them.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The CNC option is tempting. Always wanted an excuse for a new toy, but what brand and cost is involved.

It turns out I do own a Sears Craftsman table-saw molding head. Not sure I ever used it. It includes three straight cutters so I might consider trying to modify to the correct profile. Any YouTube's on creating a set of cutters.

Rod
 

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The molding is for a historic property which needs to stay authentic.

The width of the molding is 5-1/2" [ie 1 by 6]

I was thinking it could be made in three pieces. The center piece cut bevels with a table saw and round over by hand with a plane. The side pieces can then be cut using the router table and standard bits.

Rod
I would agree with you to break it up into three pieces as you suggested...that's thinkin' outta da box...!
 

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Vectric Moulding toolpath would do it.

Rod I checked your profile but you haven't filled it out, so where are you located? Lengths long enough to do each window could be done without tileing them on a medium sized CNC if anyone is close by and could help.

Making knives for the moulding head would be a problem because they would need to be a matching set to make sure the setup is balanced or it might cause a major problem.
 

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CJ Skelton is by Topeka and 4D teaches furniture design at a college not too far from there. Might be an interesting project or a class lesson on what can be done with a CNC.

Just an idea.
 
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If I was going to use a molding head like pictured, I would send the profile to Carob for them to make 3 matching cutters. The cutters on one of these molding heads is only about 1" wide, but making two passes, one from each direction could do it. If the molding is wider than 2", then consider placing the table saw fence far enough away so the edges aren't cut by the molding head, only the special center shape. A pass down both edges with a router and an 1/8" rounding bit could finish the profile, or just a little sanding to round it over.

I also have one of those Craftsman Molding Heads. It hasn't been used in about 20 years, so I had almost forgotten about it. Make sure you use some good feather boards to hold the work down, and a long wooden stick that can push the trailing end of the work through the feather boards and cutter. Don't use anything but scrap wood because it will likely be sacrificed in the process. These molding heads can be quite dangerous and significant care needs to be taken when using one. The sound of it running will likely put the fear in you anyway, so I need not preach safety to you any further.

These molding heads were quite popular back in the 40's - 60's. In fact, much of the molding in my house was made with one of them. I can tell because they didn't use a zero clearance insert or good feather boards and the trailing end of pieces that they made have significant snipe. They used them anyway and just put this bad spot in places where it wouldn't be as noticed, like behind the window curtains. Most people would have no idea why it is this way, but we who have used molding heads on our table saws know all about it.

My house was custom built in 1951. I had nothing to do with it's construction, until I bought it in 1982. Since then I've been fixing a lot of these "hidden mistakes".

Charley
 
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