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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last week had my garage walls filled with blow in insulation. Now I have 44 holes, 2 1/8 inch wide, where they blew in the insulation. They want $500 bucks to fill them in, so it's DIY time. First, the solution I'm considering, then a request for simpler/better alternatives.

I found some plugs with drywall disks glued to extra-wide drywall tape that you mud into place so the mud fills the crack between disk and hole--reestablishing the firewall. But they are too big and rediculously expensive with so many holes. Thinking of making my own using a hole drill. But the test piece shows I'll have to sand the edges and glue each disk to some very coarse paper.

Saw a you-tube video of the technique. You put mudding compound on the back side so the edges are covered, press the disk in (which squeezes the compound out onto the paper, then flatten the paper, mud over, dry and sand flat.

But this is going to be a chore, and I wonder if anyone has a suggestion for getting this job done with less effort. The integrity of the firewall is important to me and that's a consideration. And I like that the plug becomes part of the drywall while a simple patch does not.
 

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Choose a hole saw that will leave your disk about 1/4 smaller in diameter than the hole in the wall, so you have a large enough gap all around for mud to get down in the crack. Run a string or wire through the center hole of your disk and tie something about the size of a popsicle stick to the back side of your disk. Poke the stick through the hole in the wall and use the string to pull the stick flat against the backside of the drywall. This will hold your disk flush to the surface of your drywall while the mud dries.
 

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Choose a hole saw that will leave your disk about 1/4 smaller in diameter than the hole in the wall, so you have a large enough gap all around for mud to get down in the crack. Run a string or wire through the center hole of your disk and tie something about the size of a popsicle stick to the back side of your disk. Poke the stick through the hole in the wall and use the string to pull the stick flat against the backside of the drywall. This will hold your disk flush to the surface of your drywall while the mud dries.
You will need some way to keep tension on the string or wire all the while the mud is drying or the disk will likely fall into the wall.
 

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My method is similar to Charley's. I put a stick on the backside, sometimes with some PL400 or Mo More Nails on it, and I screw it to the drywall on either side of the hole. Since you have to plaster anyway it makes no difference if you have to plaster over the drywall screws. This gives something you can screw the plug to.
 

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@tom
I do not think I can explain how I repair hole here a vedio show how to make butterfly patch. His exclamation it's a little lengthy but you should get the general idea
 

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I've always used Charles' technique.
-holesaw out enough drywall blanks to do all the holes (you didn't mention the size, Tom; 2" ?)
-rip some 1/2 or 5/8" scrap plywood strips...make them maybe long enough to extend past the perimeter of the hole by at least 1" on either side
-put a temporary drywall screw into the center of the strips length...this is to hold onto while you install the strip into the hole. Remove the screw after you've run drywall screws through the wall into your sticks.
It's now permanent and no buildup ox glue between the back of the wall and the face of the stick! THIS IS IMPORTANT! If you have buildup, the attachment stick sits too far back and the patch~plug won't lie flush with the wall.
That's not a huge problem if it isn't, just more work in filling.
-screw your plugs into place...one screw centered is all you need.
-fill the perimeter fully...I highly recommend using Taping mix rather than All Purpose, but you're not going to go and buy a bag of that for a dozen holes(?).
-Let the mud dry completely...it's going to shrink!
-now fill the surface as you would for any taped joint. It really should be taped but doing small circles is a royal pain. If the plugs are 2" 2 strips of that fibreglass patching tape should cover it nicely, and you can do all the holes before mudding. Don't overlap the tape strips...just butt the long edges otherwise you'll be really unhappy with the mud buildup required to bury the tape completely.
https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.fiberglass-drywall-tape-2-in-x-300-ft-roll.1000115533.html
 

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Oliver (Prof. Henry)
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I've used the same one's Doug is recommending and they are my go to solution when the drywall patch isn't backed up by studs. I have also used Dan's technique many times. It's quick, easy, and inexpensive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hi guys, thanks. There are 44 holes, each is 2 1/8th in diameter. I think they may be too small to use the clips. Actually, I don't quite understand how the clips work. Do the two tabs stick out the front and the backing goes inside the wall?

I was thinking of doing something like what's in the film, but was going to glue the disks to a new paper surface. Since all holes are the same, we should be able to set up a production line. I think I'm going to try both suggested methods and figure out which is eaiser while still looking good.

Thanks all for the feedback. I'll check back and see if any other ideas show up.
 

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Thank's John; I didn't see that on my first 'go round. Perfect.
I'll pass that on to my local lumberyard...should be available to them as well
but that's what the table saw is for.

Tom: a 2" hole saw is perfect...1/16" gap around the circumference will allow the mud to full embed.
If, as I suggested, you use Taping (Joint) mud...much higher glue content to fill the gaps, those suckers ain't never coming back out!
https://www.usg.com/content/usgcom/...synko-lite-joint-drywall-taping-compound.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
OK guys, Did a test run using the method in the video. Took a little practice to cut the circles without breaking the front paper surface, then sliced from the circumference to the edge and peeles off the plaster so only the circle was left, still fixed to the front paper. Glopped a bunch of mud over and in the hole, slid the disk in, pressed all the excess mud out til it was flat. This also forces the mud into the small gap between wall and plug.

Learned that the narrower you make the pie slices, the cleaner they come off. The paper backing needs a little very light sanding to flake off any plaster that remains. The good news is that the patch is practically invisible even before putting the top coat on. The bad news is that I have 43 more to go.
 

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I suppose you didn't keep the discs they cutr out when they made the holes! Pity it would have saved a lot of work.

I just coat the edges of the discs with plaster and ease them into the holes. It doesn't matter if they are not flush as you can make up the difference with a skim over the top and them if you aren't good at plastering sand it down flush after its dry. You won't see the joinafter its painted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I suppose you didn't keep the discs they cutr out when they made the holes! Pity it would have saved a lot of work.

I just coat the edges of the discs with plaster and ease them into the holes. It doesn't matter if they are not flush as you can make up the difference with a skim over the top and them if you aren't good at plastering sand it down flush after its dry. You won't see the joinafter its painted.
Yeah, he was just a little too diligent in his cleanup. I was out of town when the fill was done and never thought of it. Oh well, its pleasant busy work and my wife can help out. She'd like that. DIY saves me about enough cash to pay for a new car key.
 

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I always cut a piece of wood (stick) longer than the hole diameter, feed in into the hole and then hold it in place across the back of the hole while I drive a drywall screw or two in to attach the ends of the stick to the adjacent drywall. Then I insert my patch piece against this piece of wood, in your case the round disk of sheet rock, and put a screw or two through it into the stick to hold it in place. Then I apply the tape and mud. I like the fiberglass mesh tape because it sticks in place without the mud, and then I just mud over it. For very large holes that do not span the beams I have used several sticks but used the same method otherwise.

When you raise 4 kids and a 238 lb St. Bernard you get good at patching and repainting walls. I always tried to keep a quart or more of each room color and labeled them by room. The St. Bernard became part of this problem when he was chasing the kids through the hallway and didn't make the turn well on the wood floor, but he took out the whole piece between the studs, so it was larger, but a little easier to fix.

Charley
 
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