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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a friend asking me to build some
Built-ins around a fireplace and they want to match cabinet doors from kitchen. I’m not sure but I believe the detail is a done with a rail and stile
But but am not completely sure? Anyone know where to start? I’ve added a couple pics of the doors
 

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If not rail and stile, it might be cheap pressboard, covered with vinyl. Easy to check for. But does it matter? Make good quality rail and stile to visibly match (or exceed) the pattern. Just my thought. I'd ask if the exact pattern must be duplicated. That's a lot of routing, in my shop.
 

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Hi Kaleb and welcome. Those are not typical Kitchen cabinet doors built with rail and stile bits. Those have mitered corners like a picture frame.
 

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Hello and welcome to the forums N/A...
We're happy you found us...

that door is done picture frame style...
and since you don't have shaper.....
make the outter frame from S4S base stock... spline the miters...
Bead the OS face rim and dado or rabbet the IS back rim to receive the panel...
the ornate is built up from one or more panel moldings, base caps, back bands or even rake moldings...
now all you need to do is search the bazillion different profiles that are out there...

NOTE:
panel moldings, base caps, back bands, rake moldings are each a different type/style of molding...
run profile searches for each...
 

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The doors in the pic are probably not built up, but run in one piece on a moulder. But building them up from smaller mouldings would be the easier route to take.

Complex profiles like that have to be mitered, as there's no way for a bit to cope the joint.
 

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The doors in the pic are probably not built up, but run in one piece on a moulder. But building them up from smaller mouldings would be the easier route to take.

Complex profiles like that have to be mitered, as there's no way for a bit to cope the joint.
I've built picture frames with as many profiles as those doors but it took multiple passes with different bits. I see at least 3 different passes that would need to be made with those. Gerry is right. Those were made with a moulding machine. There would be no other way to do it profitably in a commercial setting.
 
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To reproduce that profile as nearly as possible, I think you will have to start with the using some very straight wood to make the first, basic flat sections. Mitered, picture frame corners would be the easiest way. Once you cut to the exact lengths you can use a curved beading bit to make the rounded bead around the outside. (You could reverse that by cutting the long pieces a little over length, then putting the bead on the outside edge, and with the table saw trim the inside slightly to get that slight inside angle.

Put in the panel (I'd probably use ply), glue up nice and square, then use standard molding to as closely as possible replicate the inside beaded pieces, cut very carefully to fit. At least that's how I'd do it.

I'd reinforce the corners with splines. Theoretically you could make a lapped miter joint, but a spline in each corner will be much easier.

The chances of making a profile like this successfully in 30-50 ft of straight, 3/4 hardwood are pretty slim. I'd cut my own rail and style material, plane it flat and correct thickness, and get those doors together in 18 hours of less because those pieces are very likely to warp quickly. Make sure your oversize stock is sufficiently dry on purchase and stored for a week or two in you shop before you cut it.

I don't see this as a terribly complex project if you're using ply, but if you are going to use glued up panels, it will become more complicated fast. Nice project.
 

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Kaleb welcome to the Router Forums.

I think that you might get somewhat close to the profile of the kitchen cabinet doors but I don't think close enough that they would look good next to each other without a lot of different bits, work and time. My suggestion would be to look at the fireplace and design the built-ins to match the moldings used when it was built. Of course, I don't know what the fireplace looks like but I would think it would at least have some kind of transition from wall to the fireplace using moldings that could be copied easier.

Maybe some pictures of the fireplace and closeups of moldings would bring a few suggestions if that sounds like an option to you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you guys for all the help! This is my first big doe project. Obviously sounds like I’m not going to be able to match this exactly. Anyone have a recommendation for a good router table? I’ve been borrowing a makeshift for the time being but have looked at Kreg’s and Rocklers tables.
 

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Thank you guys for all the help! This is my first big doe project. Obviously sounds like I’m not going to be able to match this exactly. Anyone have a recommendation for a good router table? I’ve been borrowing a makeshift for the time being but have looked at Kreg’s and Rocklers tables.
build your own...

We have a wee bit more browsing for ya...
ROUTER TABLES
There's more here at this link on RT's than you'll be able to digest at one sit down (or many)... Ohhhhhh, so many ways and choices..
 

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Thank you guys for all the help! This is my first big doe project. Obviously sounds like I’m not going to be able to match this exactly. Anyone have a recommendation for a good router table? I’ve been borrowing a makeshift for the time being but have looked at Kreg’s and Rocklers tables.
What are you thinking of for a router table, a free standing, or a bench mount? My preferencw for a job like that would be a free standing floor mounted table. There are lots of them out there. The Rockler one would be a good starter. What kind of router do you have to mount in the table? I just looked at the Rockler tables and they are quite spendy, you might want to make your own.
HErb
 

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I would say over half of us have made our own tables. I've made very functional tables for about $5 using spare material scraps. That's not including the insert plate but Grizzly was selling those for $14 a couple of years ago so still on the cheap. I have two tables, one free standing for bigger or quick jobs and a benchtop one for routing small pieces. I like having the table up higher for that as I am 6' 2" and it's easier on my back.There are hours and hours of reading in old posts on making your own.
 
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