Router Forums banner

Hey All, new to forum, but not to routers, still learning though.

1619 Views 15 Replies 11 Participants Last post by  kb9ork
I had a problem yesterday using dado bit at 1/2 final depth. Bit rapidly grabbed the wood & pulled it in to bit overextending the dado. I was using a fence & feeding slowly. Anyone know what I might have done wrong?
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
welcome Marc..
free hand or router table????
what are you referring to as ½ final depth and how much is it???
you dudn't use feather boards and you tried to climb cut...
  • Like
Reactions: 1
Welcome to the forum Marc.
I had a problem yesterday using dado bit at 1/2 final depth. Bit rapidly grabbed the wood & pulled it in to bit overextending the dado. I was using a fence & feeding slowly. Anyone know what I might have done wrong?
Welcome to the forum,Marc.

If you were feeding your board on a table from right to left, the dado bit being away from the fence is trapping the material between the bit and the fence and the board is being fed in the same direction the bit is rotating, thus the bit is trying to grab and pull the material away from you. This is a quite unsafe condition. Some people feed it the opposite way from left to right, this will prevent the bit from trying to grab, but if you hesitate, stop feeding or let go of the board before it clears the bit ,it will grab the material and throw it back at you.

What are you dadoing? Sheet goods? Narrow boards? If doing sheet goods it is best to free hand the router along a fence.
Herb
Thanks Herb. I was making a stopped dado in 3/4” plywood. I’m making a wall/built in oven cabinet. The oven weighs 230 lbs, so I made a “bridge or saddle, (imagine an upside down U), to support a double 3/4” plywood shelf to support the oven.
After the “grab”, I clamped a stop block to the router table to prevent repetition.
I do have a router jig that I made for doing larger pieces such as routing locking miter joints in the 83” sides of the cabinet.
  • Like
Reactions: 1
3
A start and stop block IS the way to go for accuracy whether on the table or hand held.

Attachments

See less See more
  • Like
Reactions: 1
Welcome Marc
Was the bit 3/4" or was it smaller and you were on the 2nd pass? If it was the 2nd pass then feed direction was wrong. In that situation you have to make the inside cut first and then the outside cut. (standard right to left feed). If you reverse that then the inside cut is a climb cut.

I agree with the others that a jig and handheld is a better way to go. Someone will post their exact width dado jig sooner or later here. With it you use a smaller bit and make two passes, one along each side of the jig. Most finished ply isn't the size they say it is. It started out that way but then they sanded it and it winds up up undersize when that happens. The exact dado width jig solves that problem.
  • Like
Reactions: 2
Where is MT Stringer when you need him? He has an excellent post on the exact width dado jig.

HErb
  • Like
Reactions: 2
here's some...

Attachments

I cut my dadoes about 1/8th inch depth at a time and make repeated passes.
Note: Just to make sure...you was not cutting the dado in the wrong direction, huh? It doesn't sound right that the bit grabbed the board.

Here is the link to my post (includes drawings of the exact width dado jig I built. Works great.
https://www.routerforums.com/jigs-fixtures/49738-exact-width-dado-jig.html
  • Like
Reactions: 1
Thanks for the tips. I’ll make one from my scrap wood bin.
I have to rout licking miters on an 83” cabinet sides that are 3/4” poplar plywood. Does anyone have any suggestions on the best way to do this, jig or router table?
I have built an extension support for one of my saw horses and have a friend that can help me feed it through on the table if this is the best way to do this. Thank you for your help in this challenging situation.
Welcome

I am also new here and still learning so I am cannot help,

Welcome to the forum.
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top