Router Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, this is my third attempt at getting this to post, so maybe it'll actually work this time... Are my posts getting eaten (moded-out) since I'm new to the forum?
-------------------------------------------------
I recently purchased a Hitachi M12VC Router that came with two collets and two nuts. One is 1/4" and the other is 1/2". I need a 1/8" and maybe a 3/8" collet for this router for things like making PCB's and small parts. I have searched all over the net to no avail, so I am asking the experts now.

I found some collets that I could get at precisebits/dawt\com but they say that I need to buy the collet, special nut, and special wrench for the special nut, which is a bit expensive and a waste since I only need the collet itself. I would like another source for a new collet.

Isn't there a standard for collets in these routers? I got the hit from reading online that my Hitachi uses ER collets and is compatible with the Bosch collets, but I could be mistaken.

The best answer I could hope for would be "You need to buy an ER-** collet for 1/8" bits from ****.com"

Thanks,
- amishx64
 

·
Community Founder
Joined
·
6,782 Posts
When you post and it contains keywords in my filter it goes to the moderation que. When you posted this thread it told you it was required to be review before it would be public, you just missed the message :p. Anyway back on topic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
Hi amishx64

They don't make one , the easy way is just use a adapter it's cheap and quick and easy to use :), I used one for the 1/8" and the 1/16" shaft bits and it works well..

MLCS Woodworking Adaptor Bushings and Ball Bearing Guides

=========

Ok, this is my third attempt at getting this to post, so maybe it'll actually work this time... Are my posts getting eaten (moded-out) since I'm new to the forum?
-------------------------------------------------
I recently purchased a Hitachi M12VC Router that came with two collets and two nuts. One is 1/4" and the other is 1/2". I need a 1/8" and maybe a 3/8" collet for this router for things like making PCB's and small parts. I have searched all over the net to no avail, so I am asking the experts now.

I found some collets that I could get at precisebits/dawt\com but they say that I need to buy the collet, special nut, and special wrench for the special nut, which is a bit expensive and a waste since I only need the collet itself. I would like another source for a new collet.

Isn't there a standard for collets in these routers? I got the hit from reading online that my Hitachi uses ER collets and is compatible with the Bosch collets, but I could be mistaken.

The best answer I could hope for would be "You need to buy an ER-** collet for 1/8" bits from ****.com"

Thanks,
- amishx64
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Mark,
Ahh, that's why. Thanks. I remember seeing a screen, but it was there and gone before I read anything.

bobj3, Thanks! That seems like a nice easy, cheap solution. Does this affect runout much?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
Hi

They are made just for that job, it will have the same runout if you have any.. :)

=======

Mark,
Ahh, that's why. Thanks. I remember seeing a screen, but it was there and gone before I read anything.

bobj3, Thanks! That seems like a nice easy, cheap solution. Does this affect runout much?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
Hi Johnny

Sometimes you will need to use very small router bits or odd ball size that can only be had in the 3/8' shank size, I have some that are 1/32" step up in sizes and I have many 1/8" shanks size that down to 1/16" and smaller like the size of a pin needle in diam.



=========

As a not so experienced router guy, could you please explain why 1/8 and 3/8? I have never heard of such a thing?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
788 Posts
Hi Johnny

Sometimes you will need to use very small router bits or odd ball size that can only be had in the 3/8' shank size, I have some that are 1/32" step up in sizes and I have many 1/8" shanks size that down to 1/16" and smaller like the size of a pin needle in diam.



=========
Wow I had no idea, thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi Johnny

Sometimes you will need to use very small router bits or odd ball size that can only be had in the 3/8' shank size, I have some that are 1/32" step up in sizes and I have many 1/8" shanks size that down to 1/16" and smaller like the size of a pin needle in diam.
Yea, those bits are exactly what I'm trying to use with my 1/4" collet. Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
A quick introduction so you'll know my bias upfront. I'm John Torrez from Think & Tinker / PreciseBits.

amishx64; said:
I found some collets that I could get at precisebits/dawt\com but they say that I need to buy the collet, special nut, and special wrench for the special nut, which is a bit expensive and a waste since I only need the collet itself. I would like another source for a new collet.
Sorry for the trouble with that. This decision was not made to make you have to spend more money but rather to give you a more accurate system (the goal was to get as close to spindle level performance as possible). In order to have the most accurate system possible you need to have a balanced nut and a wrench that can apply even force to the collet.

bobj3, Thanks! That seems like a nice easy, cheap solution. Does this affect run-out much?
These type of adapters do add run-out. Possibly a lot of run-out depending on the adapter. One of the basic problems with this type of adapter (where you have one groove going through the tool) is that it will shift the tool to one side as it compresses to hold the tool . Run-out will vary from adapter to adapter. I personally have seen between 1 and 7 thou worth of run-out in these type of adapters. What you will get is pretty much luck of the draw.

If it will work for you or not depends on your specific adapter and your application. A good rule on thumb with run-out is that you have 10% of the diameter of the cutter before you break the tool. So a .0313" tool can tolerate about .003" worth of run-out before breaking. There are also issues with tool life and kerf/pocket size but I won't get into those unless someone wants me to.

Let me finish by saying this. I am not trying to talk you into anything or push our product. I'm just trying to provide data. Regardless of what you end up using I wish you well with your milling.

John Torrez
Think & Tinker / PreciseBits
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
Hi John

Thanks for the info..I have push your bits for a long time they are the best :) but the key word is "adapter" I think ,anytime you use one you will have run out errors, just can't get around it...most forget they are working with wood, I think and it's the most unstable stock you can use to make items.


http://www.precisebits.com/products/equipment/pc_collets_nuts.asp

John

I have a question for you,, I see it takes a spec.wrench to use the collet but many of the PC routers need two wrench system to break the nut free how do you take care of that job.. ?
I'm thinking it takes the fac. stock wrench and the spec.wrench to get the job done ,right ?

=========

A quick introduction so you'll know my bias upfront. I'm John Torrez from Think & Tinker / PreciseBits.



Sorry for the trouble with that. This decision was not made to make you have to spend more money but rather to give you a more accurate system (the goal was to get as close to spindle level performance as possible). In order to have the most accurate system possible you need to have a balanced nut and a wrench that can apply even force to the collet.



These type of adapters do add run-out. Possibly a lot of run-out depending on the adapter. One of the basic problems with this type of adapter (where you have one groove going through the tool) is that it will shift the tool to one side as it compresses to hold the tool . Run-out will vary from adapter to adapter. I personally have seen between 1 and 7 thou worth of run-out in these type of adapters. What you will get is pretty much luck of the draw.

If it will work for you or not depends on your specific adapter and your application. A good rule on thumb with run-out is that you have 10% of the diameter of the cutter before you break the tool. So a .0313" tool can tolerate about .003" worth of run-out before breaking. There are also issues with tool life and kerf/pocket size but I won't get into those unless someone wants me to.

Let me finish by saying this. I am not trying to talk you into anything or push our product. I'm just trying to provide data. Regardless of what you end up using I wish you well with your milling.

John Torrez
Think & Tinker / PreciseBits
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Hi John

Thanks for the info..I have push your bits for a long time they are the best :)
Thanks for the compliment we try :p.

but the key word is "adapter" I think ,anytime you use one you will have run out errors, just can't get around it
You're right. Anytime you add anything in the path of the router and the tool (including collets :eek:) you get run-out. Although "adapters" tend to be worse. On top of that you have an adapter (1/4" to 1/8" sleeve) in an adapter (a collet is an router taper to X" adapter). It's just the nature of the beast.


...most forget they are working with wood, I think and it's the most unstable stock you can use to make items.
You won't get an argument from me. When you start getting into the really hard stuff (ebony, rosewood, ect) it becomes all the more obvious. I can't tell you how many times I have banged my head into a wall over the inconsistency of that stuff.

John

I have a question for you,, I see it takes a spec.wrench to use the collet but many of the PC routers need two wrench system to break the nut free how do you take care of that job.. ?
I'm thinking it takes the fac. stock wrench and the spec.wrench to get the job done ,right ?

=========
Yup, you use the stock wrench plus a our spanner.

Thanks again for pushing for us.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top