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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What's happening? My workpieces seems to sometimes catch the edge of the fence on the outfeed side when running along from the infeed (right) side on the router table. It's decent Rockler fence, and since it's all one piece, I assume the two sides must be co-linear.
 

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Hi Micah:

If the workpiece is hitting the outfeed fence, then the bit is too far back (or fence too far forward.) Try moving the fence back, so that the bit's cutting edge is even with the outfeed fence.

The other problem here is that the infeed and outfeed fences are not in a straight line -- the infeed fence is further back than the outfeed fence. If one is trying to do jointing on the router table, then one needs to adjust the split fence so that the outfeed fence is perfectly aligned with the bit's most forward point of travel. (The outfeed fence should be tangential to the bit's diameter, when doing jointing.)

Cassandra
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
jointing on the router table

Hi Cassandra, I'm back,

So, the jointing is getting better, but still not there. I'm using the rockler split fence, and 040 shim on the outfeed. Things improved when I got the insert aluminum plate flush to the table, there was a little skip there. And, things got better when I brought the fences in close, about 1/8 to each side of the bit (3/4 straight bit, 1/2 shank). It's almost perfect now, except, right at the end of the cut, it seems to cut deeper. This makes no sense to me, since by that time its almost all riding on the outfeed fence. But the last 1/2 or 3/4 inch gets a deeper cut (thus ruining the edge). It seems to happen when the piece leaves contact with the infeed fence. Which shouldn't matter. Any idea what's wrong? thx.

Hi Micah:

If the workpiece is hitting the outfeed fence, then the bit is too far back (or fence too far forward.) Try moving the fence back, so that the bit's cutting edge is even with the outfeed fence.

The other problem here is that the infeed and outfeed fences are not in a straight line -- the infeed fence is further back than the outfeed fence. If one is trying to do jointing on the router table, then one needs to adjust the split fence so that the outfeed fence is perfectly aligned with the bit's most forward point of travel. (The outfeed fence should be tangential to the bit's diameter, when doing jointing.)

Cassandra
 

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Hi Cassandra, I'm back,

So, the jointing is getting better, but still not there. I'm using the rockler split fence, and 040 shim on the outfeed. Things improved when I got the insert aluminum plate flush to the table, there was a little skip there. And, things got better when I brought the fences in close, about 1/8 to each side of the bit (3/4 straight bit, 1/2 shank). It's almost perfect now, except, right at the end of the cut, it seems to cut deeper. This makes no sense to me, since by that time its almost all riding on the outfeed fence. But the last 1/2 or 3/4 inch gets a deeper cut (thus ruining the edge). It seems to happen when the piece leaves contact with the infeed fence. Which shouldn't matter. Any idea what's wrong? thx.
I usually find that trailing end snipe (the effect that you described) is usually caused by misalignment of the fences to the bit. That is, the outfeed fence is still not tangential to the bit's cutting circle or the infeed fence is not parallel to the outfeed fence.

As a test of the setup, joint half-way along a test piece. Then stop everything. Drop the bit to just below the table surface. Place the test piece in the position where the bit would be cutting the piece, if it was still up. Is the test piece making good contact with the fences along its entire length? Or is there a gap between the test piece and one of the fences near either end of the test piece? If there's a gap, then something is misaligned -- either the fences with respect to each other or one of the fence to the bit.

If there's no gap, then the outfeed fence is not still tangential (sorry, Richard) to the bit's cutting circle.

I had the same problem at first, but after installing the Incra LS positioner, I have been able to accurately position the fences to the bit and to each other. This ended the snipes.

Cassandra
 

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What's happening? My workpieces seems to sometimes catch the edge of the fence on the outfeed side when running along from the infeed (right) side on the router table. It's decent Rockler fence, and since it's all one piece, I assume the two sides must be co-linear.
Just depend's if you are using a flush trim bit with a beiring on top the i belive you use a brass bar and just make the beiring just flush on the infeed . Now the out feed should be like 1/16 back so that the wood that you take off will be just right so the board slides across and doesn't hit. Router Work shop has a fence for that . I have all 3 of them . They work out fine The splite fence's in my opion work's sometimes. The other fence's you just climp them down and you are good to go. Never a miss here. is the link Oak Park Enterprises Ltd.: Catalogue
 

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Just depend's if you are using a flush trim bit with a beiring on top the i belive you use a brass bar and just make the beiring just flush on the infeed . Now the out feed should be like 1/16 back so that the wood that you take off will be just right so the board slides across and doesn't hit. Router Work shop has a fence for that . I have all 3 of them . They work out fine The splite fence's in my opion work's sometimes. The other fence's you just climp them down and you are good to go. Never a miss here. is the link Oak Park Enterprises Ltd.: Catalogue
If using a flush trim bit with a bearing & it was flush with the infeed side fence & your outfeed side fence was 1/16" back, your piece would have a gap as it comes in contact with the outfeed fence. A flush trim bit will cut flush with the cutting surface. The only time it doesn't is if you change the size of the bearing.

Your description of the fence being back must mean the fence being forward of the cutting surface of the bit? Now you can use your router table like a jointer but setup a little different than described.
 

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Hi

I will suggest you make a sled for your table saw, than you may not need to use the router table, the router table will not get a true straight edge, many boards are not true when you get them, small bow and the router will just copy what you start out with..
Like they say junk in junk out..
The sled is just a simple fixture to put on a straight edge on one side of the board then it's easy to just flip it around and rip off the other edge to get a nice straight edge on both sides of the board..

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Hi

I will suggest you make a sled for your table saw, than you may not need to use the router table, the router table will not get a true straight edge, many boards are not true when you get them, small bow and the router will just copy what you start out with..
Like they say junk in junk out..
The sled is just a simple fixture to put on a straight edge on one side of the board then it's easy to just flip it around and rip off the other edge to get a nice straight edge on both sides of the board..

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Bob:

I disagree with you on this one. Once I got the technique down pat, I have been able to joint two pieces of wood from store-bought roughness. Once the setup is correct, jointing two pieces is quick and easy. Like sanding or planing, the technique removes high spots and leaves the low spots on the first passes. More passes gradually reduce the high spots to the same plane as the low spots.

Using the table saw presents a different set of problems. For example, one needs to make sure that the blade is square to the table.

Micah, I don't use a bit with a bearing. However, it can help do the set up. Align the outfeed fence with the bearing (using a known straight-edge along the fence.) Your straight-edge should just touch the bearing, while maintaining full contact along the outfeed fence. Then the infeed fence needs to be set back (away from operator) by a small amount (typically 1/64 to 1/16 of an inch.)

One other thing, use the largest diameter straight (or spiral) bit you have.

Cassandra
 

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Hi Cassandra

It's so easy to get a true board with the type of jig below, the blade can be out of wack the miter slot is the key and will do all the work.. :)


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Bob:

I disagree with you on this one. Once I got the technique down pat, I have been able to joint two pieces of wood from store-bought roughness. Once the setup is correct, jointing two pieces is quick and easy. Like sanding or planing, the technique removes high spots and leaves the low spots on the first passes. More passes gradually reduce the high spots to the same plane as the low spots.

Using the table saw presents a different set of problems. For example, one needs to make sure that the blade is square to the table.

Micah, I don't use a bit with a bearing. However, it can help do the set up. Align the outfeed fence with the bearing (using a known straight-edge along the fence.) Your straight-edge should just touch the bearing, while maintaining full contact along the outfeed fence. Then the infeed fence needs to be set back (away from operator) by a small amount (typically 1/64 to 1/16 of an inch.)

One other thing, use the largest diameter straight (or spiral) bit you have.

Cassandra
 

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Hi Cassandra

It's so easy to get a true board with the type of jig below, the blade can be out of wack the miter slot is the key and will do all the work.. :)


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You don't even have to use the miter slot with this type of jig. You can also just use the fence as a guide. This type of jig will straight line one edge even if it has jagged bark inclusions from fresh cut timber. Something that would be unsafe on a router table.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you all so much for the help. I'll try using a bearing (flush trim bit) to help setup.
 
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