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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've just about got this table ready to go.
I got it all together last night, but I was too tired to give it a test go.

Next I'll build a small cabinet below it to store bits and other misc router goodies.
I had no drawn up plans, I just measured and went, keeping a few videos I saw in mind.

Of course it probably looks just about like all the others out there, but the difference is "I" built this one.

I tried to give it what felt to me like an old timey finish, like a piece someone's grandfather might have had in his shop.
I also added a patina to make it look a bit worn, but well loved.
I decided to design this so it can sit on either side of the fence and or table, or be used alone without the TS fence.
I have a dewalt 618 installed in it, but the directions don't seem so clear to me as to how far the router is supposed to extend above the table at full lift.
Should I be able to press in the shaft lock at full height, or does that become useless in a lift and it stays below the table?

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John
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Looks like it will work nice job nothing better then building your own
 

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BBQJoe, It looks like a well thought out setup. I like the hinged top, tall fence w/track for finger boards and stops. Oh and by the way... it looks good too.
 

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Good looking table Joe. Have you thought about a way to attach sacrificial fences for those "other" pieces that need a fence with cut outs for the larger bits? I just ran into this while building a project that had narrow raised panel doors. The problem is with a 3.5" wide bit and a narrow door. Entering the bit you have the right side of the fence supporting the piece and then the center bearing on the cutter which is inline with both fences to help but leaving the cutter you have a wide gap that now only has a very short piece on wood on the fence which is little to no real support.

After futzing with this problem for a while it dawned on me to make a fence that has the cutter shape cut out hence I got support from the regular part of the fence and as you enter the cutter you still have support to the bearing on both side and then back to the regular side of the outfeed fence. May be hard to envision but when made properly the sacrificial fence fills the gaps in the cutter giving your wood support. I make these out of 3/4" MDF and use a marker to put the name of the cutter used. In the case of the raised panel I had already made all adjustments needed but you could have some variance in the fence and still have support.

For my table the fence has an aluminum fence with T track slots that hold my MDF, both standard and custom fences, in place. Just a thought for a great looking table.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Good looking table Joe. Have you thought about a way to attach sacrificial fences for those "other" pieces that need a fence with cut outs for the larger bits? I just ran into this while building a project that had narrow raised panel doors. The problem is with a 3.5" wide bit and a narrow door. Entering the bit you have the right side of the fence supporting the piece and then the center bearing on the cutter which is inline with both fences to help but leaving the cutter you have a wide gap that now only has a very short piece on wood on the fence which is little to no real support.

After futzing with this problem for a while it dawned on me to make a fence that has the cutter shape cut out hence I got support from the regular part of the fence and as you enter the cutter you still have support to the bearing on both side and then back to the regular side of the outfeed fence. May be hard to envision but when made properly the sacrificial fence fills the gaps in the cutter giving your wood support. I make these out of 3/4" MDF and use a marker to put the name of the cutter used. In the case of the raised panel I had already made all adjustments needed but you could have some variance in the fence and still have support.

For my table the fence has an aluminum fence with T track slots that hold my MDF, both standard and custom fences, in place. Just a thought for a great looking table.
Thanks for your thoughts.

It took me three tries to get the doors just right. It was my first attempt at using a router, and doing a rather intricate cut for the sliding door detail.
This left me with one totally botched set of doors, and one set that was close, but worth doing better.

I think when the need arises for a sacrificial fence, I can just swap out the doors and use my seconds for those, as well as making a few extra sets as needed.
It also occurs to me, after your post, that it wouldn't be hard to make some doors that are substantially wider in order to give a longer in and outfeed.

Thank you.

Joe
 

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I have a DW618 too, in my lift or out I'm in the habit of using the 2 wrenches to change bits instead of the shaft lock. Though the lift keeps the router from turning if you use the shaft lock there.

I'd say with the lift all the way up clamp the router so you can comfortably change bits. My lift is in a multi use table, I like to be able to lower the bit below the table surface, so far with the bits I use my Rockerler lift has been able to do that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have a DW618 too, in my lift or out I'm in the habit of using the 2 wrenches to change bits instead of the shaft lock. Though the lift keeps the router from turning if you use the shaft lock there.

I'd say with the lift all the way up clamp the router so you can comfortably change bits. My lift is in a multi use table, I like to be able to lower the bit below the table surface, so far with the bits I use my Rockerler lift has been able to do that.
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