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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
MEBCWD did a file for me so I could try something different.

Started out simple enough


Not too bad so far


Ended up with this - some assembly required!!


Now ...... if it doesn't come together like it should I'm gonna blame Mike and send all the parts to Ollie. He can make something out of anything.

Stay tuned

HJ
 

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Oliver (Prof. Henry)
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Oooooh! Parts. Lots of cool parts! So many parts with so many possibilities. [Pardon my drool.] :grin:
 
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John,

Don't forget you need to cut all those dowels. Keep your tolerances tight so everything fits together or I'll blame it on you if the mechanisms don't work.
 
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Discussion Starter #9
Mike,

If you'll notice - - there's plently of extra dowel length to allow for "measuring mistakes".

Playing around with finishes and colors on some scrap now.

HJ
 
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car/jeep....
 

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pickup..
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
I don't even know what it is and I want a copy of the file.
Doug,

If it all goes together reasonably well, it shouldn't be a problem between MEBCWD and myself. You don't need a CNC for this, but I'm hoping it makes the pieces fit together better. Besides, I wanted to see if I could make parts that could be assembled into a final product like others have done.

HJ
 

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The biggest key to cutting pieces with a CNC that need to fit tightly together is to really know the cutting diameter of the bit you are using. First you have the physical diameter, which on regular commercial bits can be a couple thousandth or more small that make things too tight. Next you have your actual rotating run out, which can contribute another couple thousandths using a router.

Draw a square in CAD that fits to your micrometer (don't use a caliper). In my case I have a 2" micrometer, so I use a 1.5" square. On a piece of material, cut two squares; first using the inside and second using the outside. You can dog the corners or chamfer them. If by some stroke of magic they fit together then you can call it done. Most always you need to measure the "inside" square, subtract that from the 1.5" and then divide it into two. Add that value to your tool diameter and repeat the cut. It should then fit.

I have a place that sharpens my bits and uses a laser optical comparator for a true diameter measurement. Never have had a "good" brand box store end-mill not be small. It seems $80 is where you start getting accurate to a thousandths. But even so I do the square test in order to know the run-out cutting diameter.

Steve.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Started - plans say to clamp and glue, but I'm sinking a few screws in to make sure it stays together. These holes line up.


Dry fit these - holes lined up here too.


Working so far.

HJ
 
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