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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there any advantages to Horizontal routers that make them worthwhile? Particularly to working tall stock? We don't need one for mortise and tenon as we already have a mortiser and a couple different jigs.

I have considered a horizontal router as a cheap step between our current router tables and shapers.
 

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I've been contemplating one for a long time because they just look like they'd open a lot of doors, including ones you didn't even know were there. Too, there have been several times one would have solved problems a standard table couldn't. I think it's one of those tools I'd be in bad need of only occasionally, but when I do need it, I'd be real glad I have it. I have several expensive tools like that.
 

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The fab lab university shop I just retired from teaching in bought one. The last time I saw it it had become the landing place for clamps and ear protection and such next to two conventional router table. In all the years I taught there teaching furniture design there was never a time when I thought having one would come in handy. Perhaps in a professional shop that made moulding profiles on long boards using a vertical moulding bits. Might be easier and safer than using a large diameter moulding bit
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The fab lab university shop I just retired from teaching in bought one. The last time I saw it it had become the landing place for clamps and ear protection and such next to two conventional router table. In all the years I taught there teaching furniture design there was never a time when I thought having one would come in handy. Perhaps in a professional shop that made moulding profiles on long boards using a vertical moulding bits. Might be easier and safer than using a large diameter moulding bit
Did you build a lot of cabinets in the university shop? I am thinking that the Horizontal table will be better at raised panels for cabinet doors. Or as you said, for moulding.
 

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We had a big multicam CNC there which usually was used to cut student project parts from Baltic Birch plywood, and occasionally from hardwoods, but could cut raised panels or moulding strips for trim around large cabinets. As an Architecture and Design College the furniture design courses were part of an Interior Architecture curriculum. Projects were always unique with cabinetry mostly contemporary but rare. Most projects were tables of all sizes or chairs.

Like many of the tools in that shop the horizontal router table was no doubt purchased on the recommendation from one professor or another who had a use for one in mind. Whatever that was I never saw that tool being used by anyone. The shop would also get used for college projects such as making student desks or display stands, etc. Those would be run by full time fab lab managers and student helpers. Still I can't see anyone needing to use it given all the other tools we had to use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok. I was just wondering if it made sense as a low cost alternative for doing the couple of jobs mentioned. Cost is only about $300. A shaper will run $3000 and you know the costs of CNC. We don't have a shaper yet. We do have a 4x4 CNC and will be rebuilding a second CNC to accommodate 4x8 sheets. But I was looking at the Horizontal as a low cost short term option until we get better options in place. I can run door panels on one of the conventional router tables but don't like turning the big diameter bits on the larger stock. Thought the horizontal might be safer.

Where is the university located? Do they sell machines they are not using??
 

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Where is the university located? Do they sell machines they are not using??
Kansas. Yes, sort of. When a machine gets outdated or replaced or abandoned and the shop manager gets around to it they show up on Kansas State Surplus auctions. We occasionally picked up used machines we could use from that surplus. In the past some outdated machine were given/sold to faculty that had an interest in fixing them up and using them for their personal shops.
 
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