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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Another question...

I noticed that most guns might have 1/2 stick of glue when the back end of the stick enters the barrel...

If you wanted to change glue type, how do you get the old stick out to insert a new different glue stick...? Or do you just waste the original stick and squeeze it out...?

Does the point come off and push it out backwards...?

Just thinkin' ahead...
 

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Not sure about getting one out like that. Colour indicates both holding power and required temperature range. The darker the yellow the hotter temperature to melt it/ faster it hardens and the better it holds. The white/ clear ones have the weakest bond at the lowest temp.
 

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Doug
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Glue another stick to it, then you can pull it right out.

I have a single temp gun, I have never needed to use low melt temp guns. My wife has a little low melt gun from the craft store that uses the smaller diameter sticks, about the only thing I could see needing that for is gluing wires down on a circuit board.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
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Look forward to the continued discussion. In the interim, i’ll Continue to use double sided tape.
Although I often use double-sided tape, sometimes it won’t work, Jon.

When I was making my Madame Zola Fortune Teller project, I needed to hold the box on the CNC so I could cut a large hole for the mechanism. The box was too tall for any clamps, and the bottom was open, so I screwed cleats along the sides to prevent any lateral movement. As a precaution against the box lifting from the table, I used hot glue where the sides met the cleats. I was able to make the cut with no problems, and remove the glue when I was finished.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
@Gaffboat

Oliver...I couldn't help notice in the picture of the gun that the on/off switch is also the 60/100 selector...

Is it in fact dual temp or how would the switch allow for selecting 100W if it's also the power switch...?

Signed...Confused...
 

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What you need depends on what you intend to use it for. I have two of the regular single heat guns that I use for light duty stuff which is ok for most things. I had a need for something stronger and more permanent so I got one of these :
https://www.gluegun.com/products/titebond-1361-hipurformer-pur-glue-gun

This thing is expensive and the cartridges are not cheep but it really holds. If you have to take a joint apart one of the pieces will often break. The glue also stands up to exterior applications as well. The gun is made by Steinel and the glue by Titebond.

Here's a review on Lumberjocks
https://www.lumberjocks.com/reviews/9634
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
What you need depends on what you intend to use it for. I have two of the regular single heat guns that I use for light duty stuff which is ok for most things. I had a need for something stronger and more permanent so I got one of these :
https://www.gluegun.com/products/titebond-1361-hipurformer-pur-glue-gun

This thing is expensive and the cartridges are not cheep but it really holds. If you have to take a joint apart one of the pieces will often break. The glue also stands up to exterior applications as well. The gun is made by Steinel and the glue by Titebond.

Here's a review on Lumberjocks
https://www.lumberjocks.com/reviews/9634

Nice review, Brian...thanks for the link...

Not sure yet if I need anything as strong as the purformer...I'm likely to continue using my traditional joinery techniques but, based on what I've read about this gun, it could change some of that. As I said, I've never owned one so I'm likely to be surprised when I start using one...

Thanks again for your response...Nick
 

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Glue guns.....actually hot melt guns are one of the basics of working on car interiors from my car audio installation days in the 80s and 90s.
Cheap guns and cheap glue works pretty well, especially when it's temporary.

The chemistry and technology that are in the hot melt industry are amazing, no different than the machinery some of us have in our shops - ranges from Black and Decker one time use all the way to industrial grade with a price point 20x higher.

Car manufacturers and their Tier 1 suppliers like Textron used to use hot melt for various dash and trim assembly production. After looking into this for my shop back then, I spent $200 in 1992 to get a 3M entry level hot melt gun. It was a precision instrument that also happened to be indestructible and small, light and convenient to use. Willing to bet money, it still exists and works. Never leaked out the tip, easy flow and control, etc.

The melt sticks and their compounds and melting points are also a huge part of the equation.

I recently looked into replacing my $5 cheapie that's been living in my toolbox for 20 yrs. I ended up with a $20 Arrow gun that is ok, but wont stand up on it's own and is only one temp.
Anything else I found remotely decent was over $100. Since I don't really use it, and have several hundred sticks left, this gun is fine for now. I would prefer a 3M again, but spending money on everything else has made this $20 worthwhile.

NOTE: there are 2 (or possibly more) stick diameters, so make sure you get the correct sized tool for whatever hotmelt you plan on using and being able to replenish. Obviously the general purpose is the least expensive and probably covers most of our uses from cardboard to templates to fabric and wood connections. Real hot melt is very expensive and must be purchased by the case.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Glue guns.....actually hot melt guns are one of the basics of working on car interiors from my car audio installation days in the 80s and 90s.
Cheap guns and cheap glue works pretty well, especially when it's temporary.

The chemistry and technology that are in the hot melt industry are amazing, no different than the machinery some of us have in our shops - ranges from Black and Decker one time use all the way to industrial grade with a price point 20x higher.

Car manufacturers and their Tier 1 suppliers like Textron used to use hot melt for various dash and trim assembly production. After looking into this for my shop back then, I spent $200 in 1992 to get a 3M entry level hot melt gun. It was a precision instrument that also happened to be indestructible and small, light and convenient to use. Willing to bet money, it still exists and works. Never leaked out the tip, easy flow and control, etc.

The melt sticks and their compounds and melting points are also a huge part of the equation.

I recently looked into replacing my $5 cheapie that's been living in my toolbox for 20 yrs. I ended up with a $20 Arrow gun that is ok, but wont stand up on it's own and is only one temp.
Anything else I found remotely decent was over $100. Since I don't really use it, and have several hundred sticks left, this gun is fine for now. I would prefer a 3M again, but spending money on everything else has made this $20 worthwhile.

NOTE: there are 2 (or possibly more) stick diameters, so make sure you get the correct sized tool for whatever hotmelt you plan on using and being able to replenish. Obviously the general purpose is the least expensive and probably covers most of our uses from cardboard to templates to fabric and wood connections. Real hot melt is very expensive and must be purchased by the case.


Thanks, Paul...I appreciate the perspective...and how it changes based on need...
 

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When getting a gun, the most important thing is to try to get sticks that you can use. Odd sizes are a pain. Most use what I always thought was 1/2". Turns out they are really 7/16" (.44") Amazon has them really cheap. 5lbs. for $18. I used to get them in Manhattan at shops that cater to the garment industry but amazon is now more convenient. The odd uses for them just keep on surprising me, like bodywork on a car. (for pulling sheet metal without damage to paint)
Adtech Full-Size Multi-Temp 5-lb BOX All-Purpose Glue Sticks-7/16"X10" 5lb 10 inch, Clear $17.75
 

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Have an older corded Surebonder gun my dad used and I recently picked up the Ryobi 18V ONE+™ Hot Glue Gun
Model: #P305. Wanted to have the option of not being tied to a cord. It will also accept different nozzles from Surebonder.
 

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My wife has one somewhere from her crafting days. I don't see a whole lot of use for one in the shop. Most of the time double sided tape does the job for me. Mostly I was reacting to that expensive one Stick suggested.
Tom, I have a really old cheap glue gun that I am using more and more. I find using double stick tape is hard to do if you are wanting to place a piece of wood in a certain spot and you can't be off any. also on some glue-ups, I use hot glue to keep the wood from moving around. It's one of those tools that if you can find it and get it out where it's handy you will find a lot of uses for it.
 
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You don’t have to use a glue gun either. You can fire up a torch and melt the sticks with that. By the way, the strongest hot melt I know of is made by Bohning who sell the sticks for attaching points to wooden arrows. It doesn’t fit in a glue gun.
 

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I use a hot glue gun from Gorilla. It works well and have had no problem with using random 3rd party glue sticks.
I actually recently made a review video on it if you are interested.https://youtu.be/VdhzHsMuG2U
It is a mid-price gun around $14 but if you only do a little gluing it might be worth just going with a cheap one.
 
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