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Discussion Starter #1
A piece of oak and 2 pieces of mahogany in the cut off bin looked like they could form an interesting box with the added advantage of the mahogany being relieved so as to accommodate the sides and a lip for the bottom of the box. That triggered the odd thought “what if they were all glued together prior to being cut into sections to form the actual box”.

I dadoed the oak, added the relief piece and glued the base on and suddenly realized that neither side was flat to support a cutting surface. Hence the Baltic birch was taped to the back side as shown in Er5. This added the theoretical advantage that once the cuts were done I should have a 2nd box.

The assembled slab was cut into equal sections on the chop saw and each section passed through the TS to set the 45s on each end. The glue up went well as seen in Er2. And then I discovered the major disconnect seen in Er4. The question is where is the error as all pieces are seated and square.

The box has yet to be finished.
 

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I would guess your initial dado cut was not parallel to the oak's long edge and the angle increased/decreased. Then as you cut equal sections they would line up to each other except when you came to the last section lining up with the first section. I'm guessing you "wrapped" each section to the previous...?

Another might be the dado was cut perpendicular to the oak's cross grain edge but that edge was not exactly perpendicular/square to the long edge. Subsequent cuts to make each section would show the error at the final cut only.

And there is the possibility that the dado was cut parallel to one of the oak's edges but they were not parallel to each other and then used the opposite edge to affix the base...?

Sorta like checking a cross cut sled for square by making five cuts...?
 

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too much run out on the fence...
something isn't parallel or square..
 

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"...Sorta like checking a cross cut sled for square by making five cuts...?"
-NickP

That thought occurred to me as well.
 

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what's keeping you from doing it in two...
why five...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you one and all for the thought provoking feedback. I went through the process in reverse and have come to the conclusion that both Herb and Nick hit the point in suggesting that I used one edge of the oak for the dado and then flipped the piece over during the glue up.

That conclusion was supported by a small thread of oak that was attached to the Baltic birch I trimmed off the slab before I cut the pieces for each side. I failed to notice that error at the time. Definitely an oops. Note to self, MARK the edges next time.

So the question now becomes, can it be fixed or should I just take the easy way out and just turn that side of the box to the wall.

Stick: I did check the fence for run out issues and found it to be in good steed.

Thanks again to one and all.
 

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"...So the question now becomes, can it be fixed or should I just take the easy way out and just turn that side of the box to the wall..."

Hate to say it quite so blunt but..."if yur glued, yur scrued"...

Not sure how well the glue is set and if you can disassemble...probably not...

If your corners are not glued you could recut your 45's to be off a bit and re-cut the long edge to meet your banding...just a thought...
 

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How about this...if you have another piece of mahogany...

Cut out the two offending pieces of mahogany banding...(first and last section)...

Recut the dado to be tapered from the good side to the bad side (getting wider) so that the two widest part of the dado meet...

Cut the mahogany to match the now tapered dado...

...call it intentional...boom...done...
 
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Discussion Starter #13
Well, I sort of fixed the problem. I had a bit of mahogany left that could be cut into corner pieces and added to the box after the corners were cut out accordingly. While the error is still there, at least it's not quite so obvious unless viewed directly.

I finished the box with Minwax wood primer and Antiuqe oil.


On to the next project.
 

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Cut off the off side on a band saw and make it look like you intended it to look that way. :wink:
 

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Well, I sort of fixed the problem. I had a bit of mahogany left that could be cut into corner pieces and added to the box after the corners were cut out accordingly. While the error is still there, at least it's not quite so obvious unless viewed directly.

I finished the box with Minwax wood primer and Antiuqe oil.


On to the next project.
great rebound...
 

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Thanks Stick.
Thats what it is all about ,John, fixing your mistakes, I have to do it all the time. I had a similar situation on a box and so I put the box together and cut it in half lengthwise ,took a section out and glued in a contrasting piece as an accent and glued it back together making it look like I intended to do that.

Herb
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thats what it is all about ,John, fixing your mistakes, I have to do it all the time. I had a similar situation on a box and so I put the box together and cut it in half lengthwise ,took a section out and glued in a contrasting piece as an accent and glued it back together making it look like I intended to do that.

Herb
Good point Herb and one I need to continue to practice on. The "repair" is frequently the more challenging and therein fun aspect of the project.
 

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Good point Herb and one I need to continue to practice on. The "repair" is frequently the more challenging and therein fun aspect of the project.
On the job we used to install lots of trim and couldn't nail it as we were installing thru drywall on metal studs, so we had to screw it on. A lot was prefinished trim,so we counter sunk and counter bored all the hole for the screws and plugged the holes with prefinished plugs of the same material. People would look at the trim when it was all done and say"Look, they doweled it on". because 90% of the plugs showed, we made hole patterns that were intentionally aligned and spaced evenly.
Architects make shadow grooves where two panels meet, solid trim meets a panel,etc. to hide any uneveness in the joint. This serves two purposes it hide difference it thicknesses and imperfect joints.

Herb
 
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