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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to recreate this routed edge because no one makes this backband anymore and it's on ALL our doors and windows in our 1920 home. I've looked at a bunch of router profiles and can't seem to find it. Although I will say I'm a novice, so I may have seen the right one and just couldn't picture this profile.

I've gotten a quote from a mill to make a knife, but I still think I can find the right router bit. You may have to look close as the many layers of paint make it harder to see the wave. I'm pretty sure I found the correct router bit to make the cap piece.

Thank you!!!

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welcome to the forum.
what tools do you have on hand or have access to ?
a lot of moldings that have variable profiles are cut in two or more passes on a table saw and router table. Not just one bit and one pass. (of course not, that would be too easy).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Tools: router, router table, miter saw, jigsaw. I have a basic set of router bits. I have access to a table saw but don't own one (My dad cut his thumb off with one and I haven't gotten over my hesitation for injury).

It would be great if it was just one pass! I'm assuming the notch will be one bit and the wavy edge a different one. It doesn't have to be an exact match, but not super different when looking at another door nearby.
 

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without having a piece in the hands, in the shop, it's very difficult to describe the process that a skilled craftsman would take to duplicate the profile (or get close). If I were to try it (and I am NOT a professional), I would try some different cuts with the router to try to duplicate each cut. A nice clean cut across the end would help a lot. How many linear feet do you need ??
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Option "B" would be to find a door in the home that is not used much and not seen much by others and rob that trim to use in the project where at hand - - - providing you aren't needing a whole lot of trim.
 

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I purchased custom molding form this outfit. They were great to work with and produce a large number of profiles from a exceptional number of stocks. Hartland Planing Mill - Custom Hardwood Mouldings
That said without having a clean end to measure from it's difficult to say. Still the one John enlarged in the last post looks like a rabbit and a cove. The base moulding looks more difficult but with 3 bits it looks doable.
 

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Looking this over, I think the thicker piece glues onto the wider piece. So it is really two projects. The smaller piece is actually fairly easy to cut in several passes. You don't want to take too big a cut at once. If you have a table saw you can use, it will be a much better choice than using a router because you must make several passes for the rabbet. But you can easily make the 45 degree angle cut on your router table with a bit like this:
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I know that someone indicated a curved cut, but your picture shows a simple 45 degree angle.

The second, wider piece is pretty easy to do on the router table. Here is a picture of different bits and the profiles they cut. Remember you can route the wider piece either laying down flat, or vertically. Pick a type of bit that cuts a profile the as close to the shape you want as possible. I get a sense that the wider piece is only half an inch or so thick, so you can probably make the cut in a couple of passes. Make the next to the last cut so there's a smidge left and make a very shallow last pass to get it smooth and reduce sanding.
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Here's a simpler ersion of that bit guide.
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Of course you can make a second cut with a simple beading bit which may allow you to duplicate that little bead on the wide piece.

An interesting challenge, matching old profiles.
 

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As mentioned above you could probably get away with just a cove as long as it was all on one unit and cut the notch out on a table saw. Don't be scared just because someone else got hurt, you'll never get anything done,
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use that to remind yourself to be cautious.
But this wavey edge would get you real close.
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As mentioned above you could probably get away with just a cove as long as it was all on one unit and cut the notch out on a table saw. Don't be scared just because someone else got hurt, you'll never get anything done, use that to remind yourself to be cautious.
But this wavey edge would get you real close.
Actually that wavey bit is pretty much right on. A little sandpaper work would probably get you there.

In previous posts, I've suggested drilling a 1/4 inch hole in the table near the edge, and a matching hole on the underside of the fence. This allows the fence to pivot. Since you'll want to make multiple passes, that pivoting fence allows you to set the fence for interim cuts and mark the swinging end of the fence's position on the table with a pencil. Then once you get the final cut just right, mark that position. This makes it easy to make exact duplicate cuts on all four sides of that base. You clamp the other edge down so it doesn't shift on you. You don't want to use too high a speed for this, maybe 16,000 rpm.

I'd also use a push block behind the piece to keep from tearing out the ends. Don't change the bit height.
 
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