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If I construct a chest out a hardwood other than cedar and line it with cedar how should the lining be attaced to the hardwood. I have thouht of just letting the cedar lining just float free inside the main box or chest. I have also thought of just using glue and tacking the cedar to the the hardwood in a few places. I'd really appreciate some suggestions. I know that cedar chests are commonly made of hardwood and lined with aromic cedar. Also, what about the thickness of the both the hardwood and the cedar?

Jerry
C City, TX
 

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Hi Jerry

I'd leave the lining loose - if you glue it to the outer structure it may not move at the same rate as the rest of the box and that would probably cause a few problems of warping, bowing, etc. Cedar of Lebanon is often sold in 1/2in thicknesses over here for linings and drawer bottoms. I'm not sure about your side of the pond, though

Regards

Phil
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Jerry

I'd leave the lining loose - if you glue it to the outer structure it may not move at the same rate as the rest of the box and that would probably causea few problems of warping, bowing, etc. Cedar of Lebanon is often sold in 1/2in thicknesses over here for linings and drawer bottoms. I'm not sure about your side of the pond, though

Regards

phil
Phil, that's what I have been thinking for the same reason you gave, just needed to knoe Iif I was overlooking something or not. Jerry
 

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What do you mean about the question regarding thickness of both cedar and hardwood? I'm sure you can machine the ceder to needed thickness, I have seen cedar sold in plywood form.
 

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Some plans for cedar-lined cedar chest that I saw long ago used cedar strips that looked to me as if they had edge profiles like hardwood flooring. They were installed with nails at an angle through the exposed edge. Just like flooring. I never built one so I don't know how well that worked.
 

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Jerry, I bought cedar from Lowe's to line my closets. It comes in a box (kit?) and the boards are about 1/4" thick. They are milled to fit together like flooring and are easy to work with. I just tacked them to the walls with finishing nails. Seems to me the same would work for a chest just as well.
 

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Hi Jerry,

I have made many "cedar" chests but rarely are they actually made of cedar. Most often I construct the carcase from a hardwood 3/4" - 1" thick depending on the design (i.e. arts and crafts style might dictate 5/4 stock). My designs tend to run towards the more traditional look (ogee bracket feet, inlay, carvings).

To incorporate the aromatic red cedar I generally use a solid cedar bottom (floats in a dado milled into the sides, front and back of the cabinet). I then will "line" the interior surfaces with 3/8" tongue and groove cedar lining (typically used from closets). I run the lining vertically (perpendicular to the sides, front and back) and attach it using a few small brads/finish nails (blind nailing- not seen). Please note: Since the end grain of the cedar lining is now at the top of the chest I simply cover it with a thin (3/8") strip of the hardwood. As I run the sides vertically (hardwood) in order to hide the end grain I need to add this strip anyway.

Pretty simple design but I have great success using it.

I hope this is helpful.

Best regards,

John
 

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Discussion Starter #8
What do you mean about the question regarding thickness of both cedar and hardwood? I'm sure you can machine the ceder to needed thickness, I have seen cedar sold in plywood form.
Jack, yes I can plane the wood to whatever thickness, just wanted to know what of think would be an ideal thickness for the walls of the cedar chest. The walls will be a combination of course of both the hardwood and the cedar liner. I'm thinking of three quarters thick for the hard wood and a half inch for the cedar lining for a total of one and a quarter inch. What you think?

Jerry
 

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Hi

They make cedar closet kit lining kits, it comes 3/8" thick 4" wide the norm with T & G,, a pin nail or two in the corners will hold in place..

==
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hi Jerry,

I have made many "cedar" chests but rarely are they actually made of cedar. Most often I construct the carcase from a hardwood 3/4" - 1" thick depending on the design (i.e. arts and crafts style might dictate 5/4 stock). My designs tend to run towards the more traditional look (ogee bracket feet, inlay, carvings).

To incorporate the aromatic red cedar I generally use a solid cedar bottom (floats in a dado milled into the sides, front and back of the cabinet). I then will "line" the interior surfaces with 3/8" tongue and groove cedar lining (typically used from closets). I run the lining vertically (perpendicular to the sides, front and back) and attach it using a few small brads/finish nails (blind nailing- not seen). Please note: Since the end grain of the cedar lining is now at the top of the chest I simply cover it with a thin (3/8") strip of the hardwood. As I run the sides vertically (hardwood) in order to hide the end grain I need to add this strip anyway.

Pretty simple design but I have great success using it.

I hope this is helpful.

Best regards,

John

John, thanks for the suggestions. Sounds like you have made some pretty nice cedar chests.

Jerry
 

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Jack, yes I can plane the wood to whatever thickness, just wanted to know what of think would be an ideal thickness for the walls of the cedar chest. The walls will be a combination of course of both the hardwood and the cedar liner. I'm thinking of three quarters thick for the hard wood and a half inch for the cedar lining for a total of one and a quarter inch. What you think?

Jerry
I think that the aromatic effect, nice smell, no moths, is not dictated by the thickness, so as so many others have said, 1/4"-3/8" would be fine, also except for the top strip, no one can really see the thickness. Additionaly you could make 3/4" strip and rabbet the back out to fit over the top end grain. This would give the illusion of 3/4 cedar, but without the cost or added thickness, and loss of internal space. A lighter box as well when your all done, (not that cedar is that heavy anyways).
So yeah, I think 1/2" is fine, but so is thinner material. Also, I really like Johns' idea of a solid cedar bottom. Just makes sense, but I never thought of it myself!
 
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