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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all.

The subject line sounds like an infomercial.

Can someone kindly tell me or comment on how they accomplished the bevel edges on the suspended absorption panels that you see in the attached photo.

Much appreciated. Have yourselves an awesome day!

Peter

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John
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Depending on material but looks like a table saw would work
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you @Semipro Thank you for the prompt reply. Do you believe that the individual panels that make up the rectangular structure may have all been cut at a 45 degree angle seperately or otherwise?
 

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there might not be any bevel at all - just square edged panels.
of course, you could use a table saw or router to dress the edges any way you wanted.
the one on the far left looks like it may have a hard bevel cut from the table saw.

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
@John Smith_ Thank you for chiming in John. Do you think that it is an optical illusion. Here is another photo that I had in my collection. These look beveled as well (grey panels obviously). What if all edges were cut to a specific angle then joined together (glue / brad nails, etc) Could that do the trick?
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@John Smith_ Thank you for chiming in John. Do you think that it is an optical illusion. Here is another photo that I had in my collection. These look beveled as well (grey panels obviously). What if all edges were cut to a specific angle then joined together (glue / brad nails, etc) Could that do the trick? View attachment 396080
I guess it could be done that way but it would be just that, a trick. A very hard time consuming trick. The easiest way would be to add the beveled edge to a straight edge using a table saw or router.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
@Marco Thank you. I suppose the best way to find out what works is to actually attempt it. Even if it's on a much smaller scale.
 

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what are the panels for ?
purely decorative or do they serve a purpose ?
I see music control gadgets in the photo - are the panels for acoustic reasons ?
the panels could be square edged on one side and chamfered on other sides.

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Thank you @Semipro Thank you for the prompt reply. Do you believe that the individual panels that make up the rectangular structure may have all been cut at a 45 degree angle seperately or otherwise?
From your pictures it looks to me like the panels were cut on a table-saw individually
Want to you cut the panels to size and you use a handheld router or table router to put any kind of profile on you want
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
@John Smith_ Yes John it would be for the construction of acoustic absorption panels. Almost all of my panels are built (straight edges). But, I was curious as to how the beveled design was accomplished. Here is another example of a panel designed and sold by Primacoustic
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what are the panels for ?
purely decorative or do they serve a purpose ?
I see music control gadgets in the photo - are the panels for acoustic reasons ?
the panels could be square edged on one side and chamfered on other sides.
 

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your question is still not very clear:
are you asking just out of curiosity to know how the edges are beveled ?
or - are you wanting to make acoustic panels yourself ?

depending on what material you are using for the panels will determine
the tools used for dressing the edges.
a hand-held router will not work on soft fibrous material.
a table saw would have to have a jig to cut cleanly so as not to damage the material.
if it is a foam material, a hot wire or sharp knife may be used.

so - what is the reason for the question ?

.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
@John Smith_ As I stated in my original post: "comment on how they accomplished the bevel edges on the suspended absorption panels " With all due respect John, I also said that I have already built most of my panels. See attached pic. I was merely asking how those beveled edges could be achieved from a woodworking perspective. I think that I will show go ahead and attempt it myself. Thanks again for all your help. Peter
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I just came across this build an an audio site. This should be a decent starting point for what I was thinking of doing. Thank you all for your input
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ah so !! thank you for the clarification.
looking forward to seeing your completed projects.
it looks very interesting.
my backyard neighbor is a musician with a pretty large studio where he
and his friends frequently hold jam sessions. the building is heavily insulated
with sound absorbing materials (I have no idea what they are made of)
but I very, very rarely hear them when they practice. and even then, it is just a muffled sound.

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
@John Smith_ FYI. Here is what the front and back of my room looks like. Work in progress. Basically, all I have left to mount are the ceiling absorption panels. I suppose that you can say that I left the most challenging task for last. Have yourself a safe and wonderful day John.

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Hi, curious if these are something like solid foam covered in cloth, or a hollow framework covered by cloth, or a combination of frame and foam wrapped in cloth. What are the materials involved? I know there is a kind of gooey foam that absorbs sound very well, but it's pretty ugly stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hello Tom. I used Roxul Safe 'N Sound for all of my absorption panels. I chose to use these dimensions 47" x 23" x 3". Obviously, I doubled up the slabs when inserting them into my 6" deep panels. The ones that you see on the front and back walls. The attached photo is of the tall (82") mobile GoBo that I built. Two in front of sliding closet doors. The one below is a 2'x4'x6" panel that goes up on the wall.
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