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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm building a router table.
I've never had one nor used one before.

I've seen many home built tables on the yootoobs, and it appears many folks run T track for their fences.
They also seem to run from back to front a heck of a lot longer than I imagine can or will ever be used.
It seems to me a person would only ever move their fence a matter of a few inches forward or back, or just remove it for certain jobs altogether.

Any input is greatly appreciated!

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Theo
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So far never had a use for a fence. But, I have a project where a fence will be needed. So, I'll just fasten down a chunk of 2X4.
 
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Your router table can do many things you so far havent thought of. I have a 3 ft square home made table with T track for the fence adjustment. I often do work that the fence is a foot behind the bit.
If all youre going to do is straight mouldings, then no you dont need T track. But if you want to expand your knowledge of routering, then I think its a must.
Build for the future, not for the present.
 

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I seldom (maybe once in the last three years) use my router when it's not mounted on the table. For me I only move the fence to a point where the bit cuts. So that means less than an inch. I normally place it so that the wood touches the bearing. Any farther back and I wouldn't be using the fence I would be using the bearing as a fence. I don't have a T track to adjust the fence. I do have one on the fence to hold two feather boards to keep the wood tight to the table. The back of my fence is at a 90 degree angle. The part that attaches the fence to the table has a slot about 5" long on both sides. A carriage bolt comes up from underneath the table and goes through the fence. I have a wingnut on the bolt that I use to tighten the fence where I want it. If ever I would need to move the fence back I would be able to move it maybe the 5 inches.

How to build a router table - YouTube
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Your router table can do many things you so far havent thought of. I have a 3 ft square home made table with T track for the fence adjustment. I often do work that the fence is a foot behind the bit.
If all youre going to do is straight mouldings, then no you dont need T track. But if you want to expand your knowledge of routering, then I think its a must.
Build for the future, not for the present.
This is the type of input I'm needing.
I've been vacillating between building a fence into my table, or building one that will attach to the table saw fence.
I can see where a router table fence would have limitations, but a table saw fence might have endless possibilities.
Thank you.
 

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This is the type of input I'm needing.
I've been vacillating between building a fence into my table, or building one that will attach to the table saw fence.
I can see where a router table fence would have limitations, but a table saw fence might have endless possibilities.
Thank you.
This year I added a Router Table to the wing of my table saw.... Love it! You have the accuracy in moving the fence when it is attached to the Table saw fence. I have the router on the right side with the fence on the far right side. If ever needed the fence can be put on the left side. Especially with a small shop doing away with a table makes much needed room. :)
 

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Doug
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Use the table saw fence (or one that mounts to it) if your router is mounted in the extension wing. Just remember to feed from the correct direction (may be the back side of the saw is the "front" of the router section

On my dedicated table I have NO T- Track. I just clamp my fence on both ends. If I need to micro adjust, I can just loosen one end and swing it in or out as needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Instead of starting a new thread, I'm going to try to ask another question in this one.
When using a split fence, what's about the widest one would ever expect to open it?
 

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Instead of starting a new thread, I'm going to try to ask another question in this one.
When using a split fence, what's about the widest one would ever expect to open it?


open it just wide enough to miss the cutter. Any more and you risk the wood falling into the hole and spoiling the cut.
 

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Steve
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My fence is not tied to a T track, so I can clamp it anywhere on the table. Most uses so far have only required small adjustments, but I have complete freedom to put it wherever on the table I need, which I think gives the most potential flexibility.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Router 3+, only take about a 3 1/2 bit max.

You will still need to either close the top off with a board and clamp or a feather board and clamp to maximize DC flow....
Thanks.
I was thinking it might be somewhere between 3 and 5 inches.
I know five inches would be really wide, but it might give a little more room if you didn't want to move the fence and had to get in there for some reason.
I'm currently working on my sliding door layout, and have it drawn up for a maximum of 5 inches.
 

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Here is my question. If you use your saw fence how do you run your wood through? The metal fence doesn't have a space in it so your bit will be on the outside of your fence. This would be fine if you never plan on routing the edge of the board but the edge of the board is what you normally do. I suppose that you could use the fence like you would if you were sawing wood however then you would be traping the wood between the router bit and the fence which is a no no unless you have a death wish. The fence needs to be behind the bit so that the wood rides the fence. The only exception is if you are making a slot or a dado in the wood, If you were doing that then the saw blade or dado blade would be a better choice.
 

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With a split fence the widest would be the widest bit that you would use. Typically that would be a 3" raised panel bit. You want to keep the distance between the bit and the opening as close as possible to avoid getting something caught in it.
 
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