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Discussion Starter #1
For the table I want to build, I was planning on a 42" inch high work surface for more comfort and less bending, but now I am actually thinking 48" would be nice also. Does that seem a bit high? I have used a small router table at about that height before and liked it. Besides large, heavy boards, is there any reason to think that is just too high? I am planning to have infeed and outfeed support for larger pieces.
 

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Duane, beyond the physics aspects, I'd consider leaving the table low enough that you can get your eyes directly over the center of the table to eliminate parallax when doing precision marking. For example, if you were 6' tall or less, your table is 4' high and 3' wide, you'd have trouble accurately transferring a measurement from a scale to the work piece at the center of the table.
 

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I'm 6'2" and my last table was 36" high and it felt pretty good. I have had two bench top models that I've used on the tail gate of a 4x4 truck or on top of a bench and that was okay for small pieces.
 

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Mine is wrist height and is perfect. I read it somewhere and it served me well.
 

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I like 42" because of a vertebrae problem...
I'm 6'4'' and very short legs...
 

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Duane, nobody can tell you what's right for you, except you. If it feels right, go with it. If you start with the taller table, and don't like it, cut the legs off a bit. Or start with adjustable legs. In the end, it's your comfort, your decision.
 

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It seems to me there is a thread buried in our forum that discusses RT height in-depth. Most posters used 36". (most people are under 6'). The thread also discussed the optimal position anatomically. I think it concluded above waist but low enough that downward and lateral pressure can be applied without fatigue. In short what works for you
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Well, I was wondeing if there would be any safety issues. 48" is closer to my eyes and head.

I am about 6'1. I used to be taller, about 6'3", but I have shrank! The last router table I had was a portable, about a foot in rise from any surface it sat on, and I used it on top of 36" sawhorses. I thought at first it was too high but it proved to be very comfortable. However, most work I did on it involved light weight boards, either long but skinny, or shorter and not overly broad, and also some smaller, irregular pieces against a bearing bit. Never any plywood panels, or otherwise.

Hmm.....now I have just rethought this design, because I do plan to raise some panels this time around so maybe it ought to be lower. I still feel that 42" is good though, it's only 6 more inches over standard, and honestly I find 36" work surfaces to be uncomfortable. On a work bench, I always seem to be elevating smaller projects on top of boards, boxes, and any other thing I find laying around just to gain a little more height, depending on what I am doing.

I think it is due to the beginnings of my health declining. I am only 41, but I do not feel good for my age, and my eyesight is not what it was just 5 years ago. I got new glasses two months back and they confirmed my suspicions then. I have always been farsighted, but now that is beginning to reverse. My vision had began to get fuzzy even with my glasses so I knew it was worse. My joints in my legs and arms are in a constant state of dull ache. My hands don't like to grip well on small objects (a big reason I chose the DeWALT router for the ring adjustment over the Bosch with a knob adjustment, the ring is wider to grip and easier on me). This stiffness makes it harder to bend down to work and especially to adjust router height, so I thought a high surface would be nice. I may do a hinged top on my table for adjustments. Most of what I do on a table I can just eyeball the bit height. I like removing the bearing from a roundover bit to create a beaded edge, and I simply just eyeball the relation of the bit to table surface to set my reveal, and also the same with the bit to fence. I can do that easier with the table raised up.
 

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36" would be the lowest for you, 42"
Is probably still in the comfort range as long as it is still around the same height as your elbows. Much above them could become uncomfortable after a while.

About your health: have you ever had your blood tested for inflammation? Some of what you described could be attributed to high levels of it. I've been taking Arthrotec when I get gout but it also makes my joints feel better. However, on a steady basis it's not good for you. My inflammation levels are rising it seems and I will probably start taking allopurinol (sp?) which is supposed to help control it. Just some possibilities for you.
 

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For me its about leverage, and luckily my hip bone, bench top and TS top are all at the same height. I don't do a lot of carving, inlay routing or string, but when I do I get the best push/pressure control and view. Sometimes I use my small step stool as a chair to get low but in general when my back acts up I take a break, it's not like I'm under the constraint of a production run.
 

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youre right, 6ft 4 and a 30" inseam, you got short legs.
My boy is 6ft 6" and takes the same jeans size as me, and I'm 4" shorter. but you win that contest.:nerd:0:)
Yes Stick is an anomaly , but we all new that :D

Duane I think the old thread said something about having your elbows touch the top of the router table when your forearm is horizontal while standing . So I agree there probably is a different height for every individual where it's the most ergonomically correct .

Your first idea kinda scared me as it seems like a bit much . If a panel bit exploded at that height I'd hate to see the outcome :fie:
 

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Well, I was wondeing if there would be any safety issues. 48" is closer to my eyes and head.

I am about 6'1. I used to be taller, about 6'3", but I have shrank! The last router table I had was a portable, about a foot in rise from any surface it sat on, and I used it on top of 36" sawhorses. I thought at first it was too high but it proved to be very comfortable. However, most work I did on it involved light weight boards, either long but skinny, or shorter and not overly broad, and also some smaller, irregular pieces against a bearing bit. Never any plywood panels, or otherwise.

Hmm.....now I have just rethought this design, because I do plan to raise some panels this time around so maybe it ought to be lower. I still feel that 42" is good though, it's only 6 more inches over standard, and honestly I find 36" work surfaces to be uncomfortable. On a work bench, I always seem to be elevating smaller projects on top of boards, boxes, and any other thing I find laying around just to gain a little more height, depending on what I am doing.


Duane, my router table is 41" high and I am 6' tall W/29" inseam.

My TS is 36", Work bench 35", sliding router table 34". All feel comfortable to me.

Herb
 

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I am 6'2" and the 42" height is just right for layout and general repair work in my shop. Try a couple of cardboard boxes at that height and see if that's good for you.
 

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Depends on what makes you comfortable. I am 6' and my tabletop is 40" off the ground so I do not have to bend as much. It used to be the standard 36" of cabinets.

So, my general rule is no higher than your belly button. Kinda works for everyone, no matter how tall you are or if your inseam is a freak of nature.
 
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