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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The attached picture shows a clock I’m building and you can see the front/back frames in 3/4” plywood where all gears etc. are attached. I used a jigsaw to cut these frames and I was not careful enough so I have to re do them using my router now.

The drawings I have are in 8.5”x14” format and to preserve the originals I’m making copies for any work I need. First I will make copies which I will glue to a pressboard for the template. After gluing I will have to trim the pressboard all around by 1/8” to allow for the bushing on the router.

Then I will make another copy which I will glue to the 3/4” plywood and on top of the plywood I will align/secure the template for the actual cutting.

I don’t know if its necessary to have another copy on the plywood but I feel its better to be able to see exactly what you cut. I will be using a hand held router.

Does this sound good? Haven’t done much routing for some time and I wonder.
Wood Automotive design Engineering Cabinetry Hardwood
 

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How are you going to trim the pressboard?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Its only 1/8" thick so I was planning to cut close to the line with a jigsaw and then use a file/sandpaper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So, is this the right way to make the template James?
 

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Paul
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Nicolas, I'm not of much help but I am interested in your progress on this interesting project. One thing that I can say is that if you use a pattern bit with a bearing above the cutter, you wouldn't need to allow the 1/8" but it would add an expense.
 

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Theo
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I logged on to add some to my own thread, but saw the title, and looked, and this will take the time I had allocated for my own post. I do my masters somewhat different (what others call templates). I my own designs, and when I get what I want, to actual size, I glue the paper to a piece of 1/2" plywood. Then cut as close to the line as I can, then sand right down to the line, until the wood is exactly what I want. Then trace around that onto another piece of 1/2" plywood, then rough cut around that piece. Then glue the first piece to the second piece, on the traced line. Then using a pattern bit, rout around them, and wind up with a 1" thick piece, exactly as I want a finished piece to be. Then about 1/4" in from the edge, draw a line all around the edge of the top piece, then drill nail pilot holes all around the piece. I've tried double sided tape, etc., and find all a real pain in the tookus to clean up after. The nails work much better, just make sure the nail holes will not be where they can be seen, if necessary, take the nails out, flip the master, and reinsert the nails. Short, thin nails. Then lay the master on a piece of wood that will be part of whatever, trace around it, then rough cut around the line. Then put the master down, and tack down the nails all around it. Then rout around that, and you will have a perfect clone of the master. Repeat as needed for that particular piece. I make my masters 1" thick, because they are much easier to handle, I feel I have more control, and my hand is much less likely to slip. I also write on my masters, with any useful info, including the word master, so I won't screw up and include one in whatever I am making, did that once, and never more, never more. Oh, and I would say you're going to do much better with a table router. They aren't rocket science to make, and work well. Mine is about 15 years old, the latest version that is. Pics are my router table, and several banks I made using this technique, multiples of the wizards, and all perfect clones.
 

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Theo
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The cigar store Indian doesn't look as clean as the wizards. That is because I gave it to my older son, he decided he didn't want it in the house, and put it in his shed, for I don't know how long. I found out, had him bring it out, but couldn't get him to clean it up, but at least now it is living on the front porch, so won't get any worse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well the progress was going very well until I came to fit the races where the marbles will roll and discover that my front frame was out of whack. Anyway its a hobby project so its not a big deal + I need the kindling for the fireplace!

Years ago I did a few templates and I always use 1/8” thick pressboard because its inexpensive and easy to handle/trim. I also use thin nails to secure it, much better than tapes. I do have a table mounted router setup but I prefer the hand held for this operation.

I don’t use a pattern bit, I use a 1/8” 2 flute straight bit along with a template guide adaptor. I bought this guide adaptors set of 10 bushing long ago and they all had this 1/8” lip sticking out from the bottom (thats the lip which rides the template) but for my needs the 1/8” was too much so I modify one to stick out 1/16” which is good for my pressboard and works well.

The only question I had was if I should use one copy of the drawing for my template and another copy for the 3/4” plywood which will be the final piece. Although I think its not necessary to use both I will feel more at easy if I have the second copy on the plywood to assure I do my cut as needed.
 

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Hi Nicolas, do you trust your template? If you rout around your template, you will not be following whatever you stick onto the final piece. The only virtue I can see, is to check that your template does not slip during the routing - but you are nailing it down?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You are right Biagio, it serves no purpose to glue to the final piece anything. And of course I do trust my template and it will never slip.

Many thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well the template was made and the plywood was cut today and it turned out a beauty. Before I started the cut I drilled all the holes from the template to the ply because I remember in the past quite often the rubbing of the router base on the template quite often tears the paper and that I didn’t want to happen because all the holes on the paper (18 of them) are very critical.

I mounted the new front frame to the base and it fits like a glove!

If you are interested to see the final clock how it looks/works have a look at this link which includes a video..
Wooden Gear Clock Plans from Hawaii by Clayton Boyer

The clock on this link is wall mounted with a long pendulum/counterweight. But I wanted a table mounted clock so with the help of Clayton my clock will have a small pendulum, about 12” long, without a counterweight and it will be driven by a 9VDC electromagnet.
Wood Automotive design Table Flooring Font Wood Flooring Hardwood Saw Tool
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Looks wonderful! Please post a short video of the clock in action, once you finish it.
No problem Biagio but it will not be soon, tons of work still to be done. Hopefully before X-Mas.
 
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