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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Dear all,
I have the older model Triton ½" router in a Triton table. All is good with ½" bits, but I have an upcut ¼" bit that I use in a collet. Regardless of what I do the bit moves upwards in the collet, i.e. starts to cut deeper as soon as I start moving wood through it (collet does not move.). It can move up 3/8" already after 6" of cutting, and it's driving me nuts. I've tightened the chuck hard as I can, used mallets to tighten it, used higher and lower speeds, used different brands of collets, but nothing helps. Haven't tried locktight yet, but will. Anyone had a similar problem, or have any tips?
Thanks so much,
Dave
 

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Sounds like a defective collet - I’d try to get Triton to make good on their reputation and provide you a new one - unless you’ve had this one a good while and it may just be worn out. The last thing you want is any kind of failure that results in a loose tool flying at you! I would desist from using this item until you get to the bottom (pun not intended) of the issue. I feel your frustration, especially with a premium brand...
 

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David
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Is it a true 1/4" shank - 0.25"? What about the collet? Is it possible one is Metric? Measure them and see.

David

PS - head over to the Introduction area and tell us a little about yourself, Dave
 

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Also, as mentioned recently in another post, if there are any burrs or defects on the bit or collet, you may be done with this one. Can’t be anything to interfere with it purpose or you are just taking chances. This also assumes the collet is clean and compressing fully with no sawdust in the cavities, etc. Just being anally imaginative...
 

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whose bit is it???.. (other than yours)...
try a different bit...
 
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Hi Dave and welcome. I have some 6mm bits and they literally fall into a 1/4" collet so you should be able to tell if it's the wrong size. When you say different collets do you mean reducer bushings? As suggested check the shank size to see how accurate it is. I got a bit once that I couldn't get into a 1/4" collet as it was a few thousandths too big so it's also possible to get one that is a few thou too small which could explain your problem. Don't over tighten the collet nut, that won't likely help and it could do damage. I also wouldn't use loctite. Find the source of the problem instead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thank-you all

Thanks for all the good replies. I did check the shank diameter on that bit and it was ¼". It's a little-used spiral bit of good make. That collet I used was an insert that you drop into the ½" hole to bring it down to ¼" and the problem lay there probably. The confusing thing was that I tried several inserts, but the bit rode up in all of them. I did a search, ages ago now, for Triton metric and alternative sized collets, including writing to Triton without reply, and never found anything, but I should have looked again. The reply by Bstrom prompted me to search again on Ebay and yes, there is a place in the UK selling proper original Triton collets, including ¼" and I bought one, so now I am optimistic that this will solve the problem and I can throw out those inserts. Not only that, they also sell 6mm, 8mm and 12mm collets so that will really expand the choice of bits available. I did in fact try some 3/16" and ¼" bits with a half inch shank, but they just broke off at the base of the cutter after only a few minutes, perhaps due to my tendency to buy cheap garbage from Asia, i guess. Oak and maple was not to their liking. But - hopefully - problem solved and thanks so much for the help.
Dave
 

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Dave,

Sorry, I'm late to reply to this.

Does that reducer have one slot or three (one full and two partial)? I found that the ones with just the single slots did not hold my bits well, but the ones with the three slots hold really well, so I tossed the single slot ones.

Charley
 

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Glad you found a new collet and let us know if this resolved the issue. Sorry that you got no support from Triton. BTW, welcome aboard Dave.
 

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Mike
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Welcome to the Router Forums Dave. If you broke the 1/2" shank 1/4" bits within minutes of starting to use them, that brings up the question of overfeeding the bits. That could also cause the 1/4" shank bits to creep from the reducers quicker. You might need to slow down on the rate you are feeding the stock or adjust the depth of cuts you are making. Let the bits do the work, they will last longer.
 

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Thanks for all the good replies. I did check the shank diameter on that bit and it was ¼". It's a little-used spiral bit of good make. That collet I used was an insert that you drop into the ½" hole to bring it down to ¼" and the problem lay there probably. The confusing thing was that I tried several inserts, but the bit rode up in all of them. I did a search, ages ago now, for Triton metric and alternative sized collets, including writing to Triton without reply, and never found anything, but I should have looked again. The reply by Bstrom prompted me to search again on Ebay and yes, there is a place in the UK selling proper original Triton collets, including ¼" and I bought one, so now I am optimistic that this will solve the problem and I can throw out those inserts. Not only that, they also sell 6mm, 8mm and 12mm collets so that will really expand the choice of bits available. I did in fact try some 3/16" and ¼" bits with a half inch shank, but they just broke off at the base of the cutter after only a few minutes, perhaps due to my tendency to buy cheap garbage from Asia, i guess. Oak and maple was not to their liking. But - hopefully - problem solved and thanks so much for the help.
Dave
Wow! You had to really run around the barnyard to get this resolved, but am sure glad you’re on the right track - new parts is an easy solution. Here in the US, we use 1/4” and 1/2” collets - makes it easy to order bits, which I try to get in a 1/2” shaft whenever possible. Hardwoods like oak can really test a bit so shallow cuts are a necessity to avoid jams - I’ve had my share.

PS: Cheap bits simply dangerous - good ones aren’t that expensive and last a long while under normal use.
 

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I think Mike is on the right track saying that it sounds like you are feeding too fast for the depth of cut. Not all insert bushings are made equal I think. I've seen lots say they had trouble with them. My Hitachi M12V only came with a 1/2" collet and they supplied a 1/2 to 1/4 bushing with the router and I've never had a bit slip once in it. But the M12V collet is also the best I've evr used too which may be a factor. I have quite a few from Lee Valley too for different sizes including metric ones and haven't had a problem with those. I think though if you are using a bushing that it is probably a good idea to re-torque it once it starts getting hot if you are in production mode. That might be why some have had trouble with them. I'm rarely in production mode so that might be why I haven't had issues with them.
 

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Since I am running musclechucks on all my routers, I ordered the reducer collets from them and not had a problem.
Herb
Herb - I watched the videos on the Musclechuck website - is minimizing runout using the Musclechuck going to improve tear out with a dovetail jig or running channels for glass in rails and stiles? Or is that not a solution to those issues?
 

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Herb - I watched the videos on the Musclechuck website - is minimizing runout using the Musclechuck going to improve tear out with a dovetail jig or running channels for glass in rails and stiles? Or is that not a solution to those issues?
all the muscle chuck does is facilitate bit changing...
 

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Herb - I watched the videos on the Musclechuck website - is minimizing runout using the Musclechuck going to improve tear out with a dovetail jig or running channels for glass in rails and stiles? Or is that not a solution to those issues?
a quality sharp bit and climb cutting will minimize tearout..
not the muscle chuck...
 
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