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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This past job has pushed my table saw to the max and it seems to be dying. The motor is bogging down on most things unless it’s 3/8 ply. It does seem to run better when it gets warmed up. It’s a Porter Cable 1001 fixed base that I’ve had for several years.

So I’m looking for options. Do I go back with a fixed base? I like the the fixed bases because I can rip near 24” on it. Or do I go with something else that can be mounted on a roll base or put in a designed work table? I do work much of the time with 4x8 material as I mill a lot of what i do. What’s a good table saw to invest in? I’ll probably be looking for something $800 or less.

Thanks.
 

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the PC 1001 comes up to be a router base...
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Porter-...for-100-and-690-Series-Routers-1001/203162749

the bogging down could be a dirty/dull blade..
the motor is on it's way out...
both..
have you tried a new quality blade like a Freud rip or glue line blade???
have you considered a new motor/motor upgrade???

for a replacement saw, don't sell the Bosch 4100 short... about 350/360$ refurbed...
refurbed 4100 saws are solid...
it does well in a designed work table... there are examples here...
do a search here on the 4100... there is a lot said about it all in the positive...
all the projects I have posted here were done on 4100's...
and you can do 28'' rips easily...

have you considered a multipurpose DIY track saw and cut table for sheet goods break down???

.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yup, I posted the wrong tool. I haven’t had my coffee yet. I have the Porter Cable PCB270TS. I have changed my blade here of late. It didn’t seem to help. And then, when the motor gets good and warmed up, it seems stronger.
 

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If you like the saw, the arbor and the table/fence are in great shape, change the motor...
up grade it while you are at it... ½HP or better... maybe even 1HP...
the original part is no longer available so it will be an aftermarket motor...
the data you need is on the motor..
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you like the saw, the arbor and the table/fence are in great shape, change the motor...
up grade it while you are at it... ½HP or better... maybe even 1HP...
the original part is no longer available so it will be an aftermarket motor...
the data you need is on the motor..
Thanks for the info, Sticks. When I first bought the saw, I wasn’t into wood working so much. I was offered a cabinet (side) job and took it. The cabinets turned out great (except door which we just ordered). That peaked my interest and from there it took off. I don’t consider myself a good woodworker but I really enjoy doing it. My biggest set back is I’ve never really worked with a great woodworker.

So several of my tools are sub par and I’m finding that out. I have replaced a few of them but as (when) I do, I want good quality tools. Since I plan on doing this whether as a hobby or a job, I need to invest in good tools.
 

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Excellent mind set, Mark! The sky's the limit with that positive approach. :)
I personally don't like buying used tools, but you might want to keep your eyes open for both Estate sales and guys that are downsizing (moving to a condo or apartment) or moving elsewhere and need to divest themselves of their power tools. You may just get lucky and score.
 

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I have a 3hp Unisaw as my main saw and I added an outfeed table that gives me more than 4' past the blade which is great for ripping sheet material. That will put you well over your budget unless you find one on Craigslist to refurb. I do see them for around $400 once in a while but they need a little work and sometimes the wings are missing.

What I see a lot more of and for less are old Rockwell saws most of which sell for $100-200. A friend wanted to upgrade from his to something newer and sold it to me for $100. It came wired 220 volt and it really isn't much less a saw functionally than my Unisaw is. You still get cast iron instead of aluminum with a heavier trunnion that will hold up better. The only drawback with the old Rockwells is that the distance to the back of the table is short but if you are doing panels you need an out feed table and with a shop as large as yours you should have lots of room for a big one. Those saws even came with a decent fence but I added an aftermarket better one that was under $300.
 

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the table saw is the one essential tool in most shops. Precision and power are important considerations. I went from a 1hp Delta saw much like the Porter Cable you have. I don't have 220 available at this time, so that was a consideration when I outgrew the saw. It was just not up to working with precision and lacked the power for thick hard woods. It was always bogged down, stalling, or blowing the breaker.

If you have $600 available, and you sell this saw for $300 or so, you will be well on your way to a hybrid saw. I chose the Laguna hybrid, which has a 1.5 hp motor on 110, and about double that if you switch it over to 220. I has an American made motor, a very nice fence, a large and very flat cast iron table and you can get it in either a 36 inch or a 50 inch capacity. I got the 36inch because my shop space was limited. When you assemble the saw, take a look underneath at the very heavy weight trunions, which is what the tilt moves on. You can see how beefy they are. I ordered mine through Rockler, and setup was surprisingly easy if you follow their video directions. Rockler has the occasional sale with 10% off Laguna tools.

One of the cast iron wings was not flat when it arrived, and because Laguna's HQ/warehouse was so close I called and they said, come down and bring the saw. When I arrived, they gave me a new saw, set up perfectly and incredibly flat as tested by a machined stainless steel straight edge. I learne that although built in Taiwan, the factory must allow the cast iron to "rest" for 6 months to reduce stress before it is machined.

My feeling about tools is that I expect them to last for decades, and cheaper tools just won't do that. So to me if I have to save a bit, or use credit, getting a really fine tool is always the best bet. Buy in haste, regret at leisure holds true. You will soon forget the extra cost, but you will enjoy using a really good tool for a very long time. I bought most of my tools during my highest earning years, so I didn't have to use credit, but I think using credit to move up a notch to a better saw is worth it.

While I think the Bosch 4100 saw is a pretty good machine, I think that as you do more woodworking, you will be far happier with a top notch saw. There are other brands out there, but I can only vouch for the Laguna. My experience with the Delta (which was bought by Porter Cable), vs the Laguna convinced me that indeed, you get what you pay for. The Laguna saw is the one essential tool I just wouldn't live without.

BTW, I looked at half a dozen other saws from about $700 up to $2300, so I know what you're going through.
 

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One other thing, Most houses have 220 circuits for dryers, you might check with an electrician to work out setting whatever saw you get up for 220 using that outlet. Check the circuit and phase (electrician) and then make sure the motor is usable on that circuit. You can get cable adapters and plugs for an extension cord to reach the saw. I don't think Laguna is the only 110-220 v saw out there. I did check out the Grizzly, which is cheaper, and the Jet, but looking at them side by side, along with the Saw Stop, the engineering on the Laguna stood out. I won't do business with the Saw Stop for other reasons, but there are those on the site who love them. They are excellent as just a table saw without the stop, but at least double the price of comparable saws. The one I just could not manage was the PowerMatic 66, which is a 600 lb beast, and superb, but I didn't really have a floor adequate to hold it.

Interestng choice point you're at. Get another make do saw, or a serious lifelong machine? Hope I've helped.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all the feed back.

Question - is it more beneficial to go with a table saw that has its own stand (like mine now) and is heavy, or a saw that can be mounted to a roll cart (for construction sites) or a saw that I could build a nook in a work table and use it with my tables? That’s what I was thinking but I’m stuck on how to use (build or buy) an adjustable fence.
 

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what will you be building???
what is your budget???
how much space do you have???
will you be relocating the saw to job sites???
 

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@Stick486 Those are good questions. I bought the Bosch as a second saw and it came with a collapsible stand. After i assembled it ,I found that it took up too much shop space. So I removed the stand and gave it to my nephew and made a roll around stand with drawers that I can store all the accessories in them.Also was easier to hook up my dust collection system to it.
Herb
 

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I guess it all depends on how much room you have, and the desired results. I have a 3hp Grizzly table saw. It's heavy and not going anywhere. Even though it is on casters, it sits in the same spot where it landed about 6 years ago. (forgot when I bought it).

As for power, I also used the 220v outlet for the dryer and changed out the plug so I could use a heavy duty extension cord. I haven't experienced any problems. Note: We have a gas dryer, and have never used the 220v outlet since buying the house in 1987!

Now to expand on this a little more, I am getting older. :frown: Handling full size sheets of plywood is almost impossible. Several years ago, I bought the Grizzly Track saw so I could break down the full size sheets to make them easier to work with. I have used a similar frame like Stick posted for that purpose.

Fortunately, the real lumber yard I use will break them down if you have a cutlist.

Good luck in your quest for the new set up.
 

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Thanks for all the feed back.

Question - is it more beneficial to go with a table saw that has its own stand (like mine now) and is heavy, or a saw that can be mounted to a roll cart (for construction sites) or a saw that I could build a nook in a work table and use it with my tables? That’s what I was thinking but I’m stuck on how to use (build or buy) an adjustable fence.

If you want to make your saw portable (job site) you can buy the Bosch 4100 or the Dewalt 735 and make the nook in the corner. The corner to the right and closest to you as you're looking at the table in the direction that you would feed. This will allow the fence adjustment to be on the outside of the corner nook and let the saw's ability to extend it's fence to the right.

Unfortunately, this solution will not give you much space for large sheets or for ripping long workpieces at the start of the feed.

Now, if you could have the best of both worlds, you could buy an in-place table saw for the shop and another "cheapie" for your job site work. I suspect your job site work will not require intricate cutting like for furniture pieces...? Construction stuff, right...?
 
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