Router Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,603 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am buying some S2S oak, walnut, and maple and it's kiln dried. If they do it do you think I should have it straight line ripped on one edge?

Just to let you know about prices in middle Tennessee.
oak - $2.12

walnut - $6.06 :frown:

maple - 2.90

Of coarse that is a BF.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,056 Posts
Unless you have a means by which to create that "straight reference" edge, ie jointer, hand plane etc.....yep, get it ripped..save yourself alot of grief.

pricing is always relative to where you are in the world, even in your own neck of the woods. Tenn. is a great state for hardwoods. spend the time to shop
around, get to know the mills and other wood workers...Craigs list is a great source for wood deals. The prices you've quoted are quite fair. Walnut is neck and neck with
cherry for most popular domestic. Red oak can usually be found for a good deal, maple a lil more difficult..again...all depends on your location. Make sure to inspect the
boards before you load em up. cupping/twisting/bows, knots, cracks, bug holes (occasionally desirable) pith or punky wood all can be hidden in a pile. Some mills
let you pick thru the pile, others you get what comes off the top...Always pick to make sure your satisfied with your purchase...

Lumber runs are always fun!!
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
There is an easy jig to make to straighten one edge with. One of the questions that need to be answered is will the lumber be dry enough that it won't continue to bend a little? If it will then there isn't much point in having them do it. The jig is just a piece of mdf or ply that has a couple of lever clamps (like Destaco) that hold your board on top of it. You align it as best for recovery as possible and run the edge of the mdf or ply against your fence. Because it is straight your curved board also comes away from the saw with a straight edge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
Which lumber supplier are you going to? I live in Brentwood now, and I have purchase from both Mid-TN Hardwoods in Burns, and Summers in LaVergne. Please let me know because I may have to stock up on some Maple. Thanks.
 

·
Marine Engineer
Doug
Joined
·
4,786 Posts
It depends on the project. If it going to be large furniture, it might be worth it. If it is smaller pieces, no.

I like to look at the grain and plan the pieces around it. Rarely does the sawn edge orient perfectly with the the best looking flow of the grain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,603 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Which lumber supplier are you going to? I live in Brentwood now, and I have purchase from both Mid-TN Hardwoods in Burns, and Summers in LaVergne. Please let me know because I may have to stock up on some Maple. Thanks.
It is Mcewen lumber in Lavergne. It's part of Hood industries. I don't think Summers is in business any more.
 

·
Marine Engineer
Doug
Joined
·
4,786 Posts
Make sure to inspect the
boards before you load em up. cupping/twisting/bows, knots, cracks, bug holes (occasionally desirable) pith or punky wood all can be hidden in a pile. Some mills
let you pick thru the pile, others you get what comes off the top...Always pick to make sure your satisfied with your purchase!
Always pick through the pile, just make sure you don't make a mess. I will not remain a customer of a yard that doesn't understand that some boards are better than others for a project, or you need to match figure across several boards in a project.

Be a good customer and you will find that they may 'adjust' the price of some boards to move them, or bundle some extras in to make a sale. I have even had this happen with a piece of maple plywood with the ugliest veneer. They took 20% off of it when I bought 3 other sheets because nobody wanted it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,888 Posts
I have a thread at the moment called 'Whats the Best Wood' so I am posting one of the photos here and as the saw I used for this cut is 170mm from its edge to the blade then that's why the straight edge is away from the cut edge, I also run a router along this bar when I need to get a clean square edge, everyone should have a long straight edge, it does not have to be aluminum, if you only use it to run a hand circular saw along it then it can be ply but I always want the cut very straight so I have this 2400mm long bar, anyway a long straight edge can be used to clean up an edge if you just clamp it to overhang 'just enough' then you run a saw or router along it and the edge will get cut straight with minimum loss. I also have a sled for the bandsaw as that sled is very handy. If the piece you want straight is too small then clamp that to a piece of ply that is big enough and then you can cut it straight, there is always a way. N
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,369 Posts
There is an easy jig to make to straighten one edge with. One of the questions that need to be answered is will the lumber be dry enough that it won't continue to bend a little? If it will then there isn't much point in having them do it. The jig is just a piece of mdf or ply that has a couple of lever clamps (like Destaco) that hold your board on top of it. You align it as best for recovery as possible and run the edge of the mdf or ply against your fence. Because it is straight your curved board also comes away from the saw with a straight edge.
I'm with others in that you want to pick through the pile. Getting one edge ripped might seems drawbacks.

(my disclaimer) I'm from the Paciifc Northwest, so I don't know the humidity where you live, so this is based on a high humidity area where I live.

I'm with Charles in ripping my own glue edges. Sight along the edge and determine where the bow is. Place the bow away from a straight-line jig (I'll post a picture of one of mine tomorrow/ too dark right now). What it is, is a strip of plywood with a 1x2 lip on one edge. The work piece rests on top along the edge, with the bow facing away from the edge. Then the jig goes along your rip fence.

(lots easier now on my panel saw...)
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top