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Hello, new to the forum(today). Yesterday(Sat Aug 01 2009) I was making arched raised panel doors and smoked my router. It was installed in a bench-dog cast iron table attached to my Unisaw. Never had a problem until now, but it was my first go at arched doors, I was using red oak. Due to the unique table top, I had installed a probably too-smal small cutom box underneath with an attachment for my 4" DC system, and an adjustable air inlet to ensure airflow around the router. Normally, I use a second attachment on the fence, but due to the panel arch, I was free handing the panels with a big scary panel raiser. First use of that as well, I was paying 100% attention to the BSPR, and not much on everything else. The DC never complained or seemed to have changed pitch(the routing made incredible noise, however). I made one pass with all 16 doors using a 1" bearing, and was half way though again with a 5/8" bearing, to finish with the 1/2" eventually. The router abrupty stopped in mid cut. Odd, I thought, and looked at the switch, then breaker panel, eventually opening the access panel in the router box. It was completely packed solid with wood chips. Somehow, the air outlet got blocked(wide open throat at the bit coupled with no fence suction maybe?) apparently directed a whole lot more chips going into the box. Additionally, the cord in the box was partially obstructing the air outlet, and should have been secured better, and the DC was full, probably dropping air pressure. Anyway, I installed my PC690, and finished the doors, but now I have a plunge and fixed base and no Bosch motor. Can these be re-wired? Can I buy just the motor body? I should install a bigger 15 amp router if I'm going to keep doing these types of projects, but they'll burn up just as quick if insulated in wood chips that way. Would be nice to hace a reset switch for overheating. I didn't smell anything until the DC was turned off, then it was awful. If nothing else, this is to inform the community to peridically check things you normally might not be concerned with when performing new or unusual tasks. A larger box to contain the router may have helped, but I should have taken more breaks, and been less complacent about DC. Safety was and is paramount, but I killed a really nice router for no good reason.
 

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Hi Woody:

Welcome to the forums!

If this my situation, I would consult a Bosch service centre to have an estimate at the cost to repair the unit. Also, find out from Bosch how much to buy a new motor unit. Once I had those two prices, I would decide whether to repair, replace or junk the Bosch pieces (motor unit and bases.)

Service Center Locator: http://boschtools.com/Service/ServiceCenterLocator/Pages/default.aspx

Bosch Parts & Service Online: https://www.boschtoolsservice.com/

Cassandra
Another happy 1617EVSPK owner
 

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Hi Woody:

On the other issue: There are points to consider when designing an adapter for the DC system.

The air flow through the router motor unit should be from a "dust-free" environment. This means that the dust-laden air from the table should NOT pass into the router motor unit.

The air flow should through the motor unit in the direction that the manufacturer intended. Trying to push air the other way defeats the protection built into the internal workings of the motor unit.

The air flow through the motor unit should NOT be restricted in any way. Forcing air into the motor unit's inlets is helpful, when done with moderation.

HTH,
Cassandra
 

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Woody, are you saying the router's internal fan was unable to keep the chips from falling down into the air outlet? Is the router fan's air intake able to suck all the clean air it needs?

Mine runs a little cooler since I provided a duct for intake of clean air.

It's too bad Bosch didn't use a thermal switch or a thermal fuse. Brush type motors heat up easily.
 

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Hello woody
Welcome to the forum. I wish that i could tell you, Yes have it rewired, It is usually to expensive to do it. If you like that router well, you may want to buy a new one, or a re manufactured one. I have had very good luck with re manufactured. I am told that many times, people will return them, or they are shipped back from a store as open box. What ever you do, i know that you will have some information that will protect the tools, Enjoy the forum, and please add where you are from on your profile. Thank you.
 

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I'm curious, have you revisited the router to see if it would start once it cooled? Blow the sawdust out of it and give it a shot... maybe you'll get lucky and there will be a thermal overload built into the router.
 

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Welcome aboard.
 

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I'm curious, have you revisited the router to see if it would start once it cooled? Blow the sawdust out of it and give it a shot... maybe you'll get lucky and there will be a thermal overload built into the router.
Definitely worth a shot. The 1617 had a switch replacement, as well. You might get lucky and find that the switch is loaded with dust and isn't working. The brush holders are prone to build-up, too.

You can purchase anything from a new armature to an entire motor and housing. Good luck with the repair.

This seems like another endorsement for the "dual-chamber" motor enclosure, an enclosure for the DC and a separate space for the router's air supply.
 

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Have you looked at the brushes yet ?
Its possible they have just glazed over or burnt up from the heat.
They usually go 1st don't they ?
MUCH cheaper fix if they did @ around $15.99 for the set.
 

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The first step is to remove all the sawdust from the router. If it is really loaded this may require dis assembly. Dust can clog the router, block the brushes from making contact. After all the debris is removed you will be able to see if there is melt down damage. There is a good chance you can clean the router and re assemble it and it will work. If not then a rebuild is in order. One of my 1617 motors was a rebuild and it has been problem free. Since you mounted the router in the table how often have you removed it to clean it? As far as the dust collection box it should have 3 sides to channel the dust to the collection hose as close to the table as possible. This will draw the dust away from the motor better than any other situation and should your collector stop working because of a full bag you will have instant dust on the floor to show you.

At any rate do not "junk" the router bases. If you replace your router let me know and I (or someone) will buy the bases from you.
 

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I think they should make routers dedicated to table work. The fan modified to draw at a higher rate and the infeed opening should be capped and supplied with a feed line that can be run outside the table or with a blower mounted on the exterior of the table.

One habit I got into after smoking my 1st 690 on composite decking is to regularly check the infeed grate for debris. During extended routing projects I open up and vac the router for dust, (I do a lot of fir molding for some old houses). Chips can block the grate but dust gets in the windings.

Anyone ever take theirs apart once a yr. for cleaning? Would that void the warranty?
 

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I haven't taken mine apart for cleaning but I do remove it for cleaning with the compressor and vacuum after each use. I'm anal like that I guess but it should last a long long time that way. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well, lots of good info here. I did blow the motor out with my compressor, it was like a blow dryer for a few minutes. The fan on the motor was working fine, just the box surrounding it was totally packed full of chips. Haven't had time to check the the brushes, but it stunk to hell of burnt insullation when I got it out of the box. Pretty sure I cooked it good. Had reserve AT followed up by another drill this weekend, but I'll look into it this weekend. Maybe turn it in for a refurbished? Or just buy a refurbished and junk the original? If I have to buy new, and have to get another kit, I'll let the fixed/plunge parts go to someone for shipping. Can I get just the motor body? I hate to trash good stuff. Thanks for the feedback... Aaron
 

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Check those brushes out 1st.
They do stink severely when you burn them up. They can get REALLY hot and begin to turn to dust. When they do it throws out a horrid odor. Then after they dust off so far they cant make connection with the arbor to send a charge through to turn it. It would probably be just as expensive to purchase a new motor versus buying the router again. Brush sets are only around $8 - $10.00. They are directly under the top cap on the router. Really easy to get to.
 

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"I'll let the fixed/plunge parts go to someone for shipping."
If you decide to go this route, I would be interested. I'd want to pay you more than just shipping, though.

Regards,

Michael
 

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What has been happening with the router. What have you found out? I am curious and would like to help out others with the information that i can find.
 

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You can buy a replacement motor by itself so that is the smart way to go. (I did so I don't have to swap bases)
 

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If you didn't smell smoke, chances are real good that you did not burn the wiring - burned motor wiring/windings create smoke and a very obnoxious odor. If you have the EVS model, you may have burned out the speed control/soft start module or perhaps the switch. Checking the parts diagram for the 1617, which I also have, I see no thermal overload protector - too bad, that would be simple. I would suggest you visit (or call) your nearest Bosch Service Center, explain the problem to them and either deliver or send the router to them for an estimate. The variable speed/soft start module costs about $27 for a replacement (ToolsPlus)

I also agree with a previous poster who suggested you remove the motor housing cover (two screws) and blow out the interior, particularly around the switch. It may or may not help but it is certainly worth a try.

Jim
 

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The Bosch 1617 (and the Craftsman - Made by Bosch), has a very powerful cooling fan that sucks air directly into the router - and dust, dirt etc along with it. I am with the earlier suggestion to get the air supply from OUTSIDE the cabinet. There is a very strong possibly that the router maynot be damaged at all. It would be worth it to disassemle the router (unplugged of course) and clean it up as muchas possible. If you can see the armature and it does not look burned, or the windings melter, look to see where the brushes contact the whatever you call it and see if that section is burned. (Most likely). With some emery cloth you may be able to clean that up and you might be back in business.

A question about voiding a warranty - if the router is more than a year old -What Warranty? If less than a year old - carefully disassemble, reassemble, repair and make no modifications you should be ok. After all - Bosch switch replacement can be made by the user - as suggested by BOSCH. Just a thought.
 
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