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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m brand new to wood working as I’m in the process of purchasing a house, so I figured I’d need to know my way around a few tools so I wouldn’t have to hire someone to fix everything that messes up.
With that being said, I recently purchased the Avid Power 6.5 a trim router and I have absolutely no idea how to install the bits that came with the router. I’ve searched YouTube, google and read through the manual and I guess it’s all going over my head. I’ve attached pictures to show me attempting to put the bit in and taking the collet nut off.
Thanks for any and all help
 

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Are you having trouble tightening the nut?
If so, are you pushing the button on the side holding it in and turning the nut until it locks the shaft so you can tighten the nut?
I hope that makes sense but if that isn’t your issue then I apologize. Otherwise I’m not sure what you are having trouble with.

Good luck,
Bryan
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Are you having trouble tightening the nut?
If so, are you pushing the button on the side holding it in and turning the nut until it locks the shaft so you can tighten the nut?
I hope that makes sense but if that isn’t your issue then I apologize. Otherwise I’m not sure what you are having trouble with.

Good luck,
Bryan
I’m not having trouble with the nut itself, just getting the bits into the collet. They aren’t going in, even though it is the right size collet (I’ve quadruple checked at this point). It seems like the collet isn’t getting loose at all, even after completely removing the nut.
 

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Welcome to Router Forums,

If those photos are in sequence, you are doing it wrong. Put the nut on the collet, but leave it loose. Then insert the shank of the router bit into the collet. It should be pushed in all the way, but then pulled back out about 1/8". Then you tighten the collet nut to lock the bit in place. Some trim routers have a lock button, which you hold in while tightening the collet nut with the included wrench. Others have two wrenches, one to hold the shaft while the other is used to tighten the nut.

Are you certain that you are using the correct size bit for the collet? An Imperial/Metric difference could be your problem. I am not at all familiar with the Brand that you have, but maybe you have an Imperial !/4" bit and a Metric collet.

You should read more of this forum for a good education about holding and using this router before you attempt to use it.
The direction of feed is very important, and going the wrong way can cause the router to pull out of your hands, damaging your project, and maybe you in the process. Learn how to use a router properly and practice on scraps before attempting your project.

Don't hesitate to ask more questions here. We love to help those new at woodworking.

Charley
 

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Welcome to the forum.
 
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G'day @Wjoiner , welcome to the forum.

Unless you are going to change the collet size, there should be no need to take the collet nut off the shaft.

As Charley said, "Put (leave) the nut on the collet, but leave it loose. Then insert the shank of the router bit into the collet. It should be pushed in all the way, but then pulled back out about 1/8". Then you tighten the collet nut to lock the bit in place. "

Again, check the sizes. The cutter and collet may be different sizes (imperial -v- metric)

Is this a new router? Someone may have sold you a router with the wrong sized collet????

Look what I found....
This router comes with 1/4" and 3/8" collets.....
 
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Welcome to the forum. From your photos it looks like the collet nut may have been tightened without a bit in place. You should be able to get it to loose if you tap the tapered collet near side of the slot with a small punch and a hammer. It is a taper and it is jammed in the bore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Welcome to the forum. From your photos it looks like the collet nut may have been tightened without a bit in place. You should be able to get it to loose if you tap the tapered collet near side of the slot with a small punch and a hammer. It is a taper and it is jammed in the bore.
This seemed to be the problem, I tapped it a few times and the bit slid right in.
Thank you to all that took the time to help!
 

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This seemed to be the problem, I tapped it a few times and the bit slid right in.
Thank you to all that took the time to help!
Glad it worked out for you. Please take the time to look over the forum there is some good info on safety and other advice that should help you out.
 

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The collet nut is supposed to snap into a groove in the collet. This allows the nut to pull the collet up as the nut is loosened. If you haven't snapped the nut and collet together before assembly, you are going to have one heck of a time getting the collet to release the router bit when it comes bit removal time. The bit also appears to have been installed too far into the collet. The collet should only be gripping the smooth polished surface of the bit shank. Normal removal, if the collet and nut are snapped together, is to loosen the nut about 1 turn, where it then gets too tight to turn with your fingers. Using the wrench to loosen the nut further will then pull the collet up out of the shaft and the router bit will then be easy to remove and replace.

Charley
 

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The collet nut is supposed to snap into a groove in the collet. This allows the nut to pull the collet up as the nut is loosened. If you haven't snapped the nut and collet together before assembly, you are going to have one heck of a time getting the collet to release the router bit when it comes bit removal time. The bit also appears to have been installed too far into the collet. The collet should only be gripping the smooth polished surface of the bit shank. Normal removal, if the collet and nut are snapped together, is to loosen the nut about 1 turn, where it then gets too tight to turn with your fingers. Using the wrench to loosen the nut further will then pull the collet up out of the shaft and the router bit will then be easy to remove and replace.

Charley
Charley not all routers have that type of collet that you are referring to. I have a few trim routers that don't, they rely on you having a bit in the collet when you tighten or loosen the nut. Just like his. But the bit is too deep in the collet as you say.
 

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Charley not all routers have that type of collet that you are referring to. I have a few trim routers that don't, they rely on you having a bit in the collet when you tighten or loosen the nut. Just like his. But the bit is too deep in the collet as you say.
I guess we'll find that out when he tries to remove the bit.

Charley
 

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I have about 6 collets for my portacable router. If the bits are hot the collets are a whole lot cooler to handle. I never needed more than one collet until I started using the CNC then they proved to be of high value.
 

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I do not understand why you began woodworking with a router, probably the most dangerous power tool there is: the blade is unguarded, one small slip and you lose a finger. I never met a house carpenter who owned a router. Circular saws, jig saws, hammers, squares, measuring tapes, yes. Routers usually are used by cabinet and furniture makers, occasionally, boatbuilders. Is there a project you want done that requires a router? Why don't you start with a carpenter's kit?If you live near a community college or a high school with adult learning classes, you can learn the basics with a pro and save yourself time and fingers. Or work with a pro or a skilled neighbor. Please, be sensible.
 

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I do not understand why you began woodworking with a router, probably the most dangerous power tool there is: the blade is unguarded, one small slip and you lose a finger. I never met a house carpenter who owned a router. Circular saws, jig saws, hammers, squares, measuring tapes, yes. Routers usually are used by cabinet and furniture makers, occasionally, boatbuilders. Is there a project you want done that requires a router? Why don't you start with a carpenter's kit?If you live near a community college or a high school with adult learning classes, you can learn the basics with a pro and save yourself time and fingers. Or work with a pro or a skilled neighbor. Please, be sensible.
I45 years ago in High School I think a router was my 3rd purchase after a table saw and belt sander! Very useful tool in the right hands.
 

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I45 years ago in High School I think a router was my 3rd purchase after a table saw and belt sander! Very useful tool in the right hands.
The post said he wanted to be able to do house repairs. The tools you mentioned are for woodworking except for the table saw. Actually, a contractor's saw would be better - for portability.
 

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Very useful tools in the right hands. Some folk like square edges and others like them rounded over. A router makes quick work in many things but it's all according to the guy using them. Some like it hot some like it cold. Some take 3 weeks to do something that others can do in a day or two. I have seen formica put on with a file and formica put on with a router. Having framed over 60 houses, barns, garages.... your right I didn't need the router on the framing part. However once inside it became a valuable tool. It's all based on the hands that are using it. I have seen people cobble up stuff with a cheap contractors saw and the same saw used by another can turn out fine furniture.
 
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