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The wife of my friend that I recently made a frame for his 12" x 12" Kookaburra tile asked if I would make a trivet from a 6" x 6" Kookaburra tile. This photo shoot is not meant to insult the intelligence of members because of it's simplicity, but simply to show how I went about it. I know there will be members who consider the way I cut the spline slots to be dangerous, but it isn't, fingers are well out of the way, however, as a gesture to those members I will post a shot at the end showing an alternative method that I use when the mood takes me.
 

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Nice work again Harryson. It is amazing how many power tools you use in making something as simple as that. That is where I am ,learning how to work with the tools and how to glue it up and clamp it.
 

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Great job Harry - I also agree on the tool factor. Just a simple job - but lots of tools. I guess that is why woodworkers have so many tools - every one seems to be needed - even on small projects.
 

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Thanks for the kind remarks guys, I'm constantly amazed at the number of tools required for even a quite basic job like this.
 

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Who do you think Noah borrowed the tools from? This is how Harry got the free boat ride from England to Oz.
 

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Great job, Harry

How do you find the accuracy of the Triton 2000?

James
 

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How right you are Maurice, it takes years to build up a well equipped workshop and although before any major purchases these days I have to ask myself if it's really necessary at age 75, I also occasionally wonder what will happen to it all when I'm gone, at this point in time my son and grandson don't have any real interest in woodworking.
I wonder what suggestions members will come up with regarding the last point!
 

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Who do you think Noah borrowed the tools from? This is how Harry got the free boat ride from England to Oz.
I actually allowed Noah to keep most of the tools for maintenance, arriving in Australia in '64 with very few and have built up the collection since then.
As a matter of interest Mike it wasn't a free boat ride from England, it cost Marlene and I ten pounds each, 7 year old Paul nothing and it wasn't a boat ride, we flew here in a turbo prop plane that took 36 hours, stopping every five minutes to re-fuel. These days it takes only 19 hours with just one stop.
 

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Great job, Harry

How do you find the accuracy of the Triton 2000?

James
Mine has the Triton saw permanently fitted. The secret for accuracy is to set it up accurately in the first place, this is easy when using the Triton saw as it has holes in it's base that fit into cams, making positioning the saw very simple. once it is set up like this, whatever you set the fence to is what will be cut, and that saw gives a superb cut. There is a rise and fall kit available which I reckon is essential.
 

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How right you are Maurice, it takes years to build up a well equipped workshop and although before any major purchases these days I have to ask myself if it's really necessary at age 75, I also occasionally wonder what will happen to it all when I'm gone, at this point in time my son and grandson don't have any real interest in woodworking.
I wonder what suggestions members will come up with regarding the last point!
Although an interest in woodworking is usually ingrained early, some develop the interest later in life. So, there's probably still some hope for them. ;)
 
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