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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As some of you remember I have a tiny Delta table saw with a 10" blade. The motor is very OK with 1800w. It costed 50€ and a new blade more than the half of the price. Im quite content with it. If I wanted a better saw I should spend much more than 1000€ then it would be new because its hard to find good 2nd hand tools that are professional grade but small since Im not having a factory.
Well anyhow the saw is pretty ok but the tiny dust port is just a bad joke. After some years I got enough of having the shop full of sawdust after 50cm of sawing. So I made a new dust port. Im still using the original and the both of them together works as a charm.

The next project will be a larger top to this saw of some sort
 

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Every port you can add seems to be fair game, when it comes to reducing dust. My saw as an over-arm collector, in addition to the stock port on the bottom, but I still set a third 4" pipe up near the back of the blade, where it throws bazillion mile and hour dust and chips, when I'm doing a lot of certain kinds of cutting. It, especially, helps when I'm doing mortise and tenons.
 

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Frank
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I am currently adding an over the blade dust collection to my table saw. It has the bottom collection to shop vacuum and I enclosed the back by the motor. All that is left is the blade dust.

Frank
 

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My table saw is the worst dust maker in my shop so I'm also looking at an over the blade addition. If it's throwing crap in your face then that means it's also going up your nose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Very true Charley and thats why even its a bit heavy and so forth I allways wear a Sundström mask added with active carbon and P3. Ill like to have the rest of my lungs to my self; as a young guy I worked in Finlands biggest paint factory on the production and it have had some affects on my lungs, thats why a raspirator if Im on the shop.
 

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Jon,

Both. I saw what I wanted on YouTube. Purchasing a Universal Dust Collection Port from Rockler for $80.00. It is for lathes, but will be modified to hang from ceiling above blade. I mounted track to ceiling to allow me to move saw when ripping large sheets. I will be able to slide collector hose into place. Waiting for Rockler to send a 20% off one item so I can purchase the Port. I have the plumbing into my shop dust collection system completed and track mounted. Just waiting on bracket. Will post pictures when completed.

Frank
 

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As some of you remember I have a tiny Delta table saw with a 10" blade. The motor is very OK with 1800w. It costed 50€ and a new blade more than the half of the price. Im quite content with it. If I wanted a better saw I should spend much more than 1000€ then it would be new because its hard to find good 2nd hand tools that are professional grade but small since Im not having a factory.
Well anyhow the saw is pretty ok but the tiny dust port is just a bad joke. After some years I got enough of having the shop full of sawdust after 50cm of sawing. So I made a new dust port. Im still using the original and the both of them together works as a charm.

The next project will be a larger top to this saw of some sort

I saw this on YouTube the other day and thought it looked pretty good.

 

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Well anyhow the saw is pretty ok but the tiny dust port is just a bad joke. After some years I got enough of having the shop full of sawdust after 50cm of sawing.
- more dust collection is always better. You might also try another tact.

- I found that by replacing the all-purpose blade (32-40 tooth) that came on on my table saw with a thin kerf Freud blade (50-60 tooth) the flying dust was noticeably reduced when sawing making it much easier for my built in collector to get the dust.

- does it eliminate dust, no. But reducing the dust at the blade and improving your collection will both help ....

- ebill
 

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Hey, Tiny; is that you in the vid? You're an experienced woodworker so I was a bit surprised to see the person in the video wearing heavy gloves around a tablesaw.
I'm sure you already know that's a serious personal injury hazard(?)...
If wood dust on your skin is causing problems, either 'barrier creme' or skin tight Nitrile gloves will give you skin protection.
By the way, your candidate for Finland's leader, Laura Huhtasaari, wow! Just Wow!! She gets my vote... ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You know ebill I was thinking of thay how many tooths is enough for my saw since the motor is only 1800W. The finish would be better with more teeth but that was a hint that the blade has its effect to the type and amounth of dust in the shop
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hi Dan. Its not me. We dont have sash Windows ? Thanks for the complement. Im not using that kind of glows If Im using. Ill newer thought that glowes could be a risk. I can think of why but why heavy glows are a risk?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I Forgot Laura.
I think shes a good looking b***h but her thoughts of life, universe and everything is... How should I put it..well I wouldnt like us to have same kind of president as the blond guy on the east coast If you know whom I mean...
 

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I'm not wild about his setup. He's not sawing tight to the fence but at the 2 minute mark you see the saw catch a cut off and move it back and towards the fence. For the operation he's doing the gloves aren't a big issue but I don't like wearing gloves even when it isn't a problem to have them on. Tiny gloves can slip, especially leather gloves. They also affect your perception of where your fingers are which is a bad thing. If they caught in machinery they will drag your hand into the cutter. Loose sleeves, long hair hanging down, necklaces and jewelry are all bad ideas when you are operating machines.

The first job I had after finishing high school was feeding tree limbs into a mobile chipper. We were forbidden by the company to wear gloves because several people had lost arms when the cuffs of the gloves they were wearing got hooked on a broken stub and their arms got dragged into the chipper. It was a very rough job for bare hands but I liked having two arms.
 

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I never thought that gloves could be a risk. I can think of why but why heavy gloves are a risk?
When using any woodworking material anything that can potentially be caught either by the blade or by the materials being worked (e.g. on splinters) - loose clothing, long hair (which hasn't been restrained), loose jewelry and gloves can all be caught and dragged-in - is a bad idea. That's why they are all but banished from professional workshops.

That said, I work in an environment (construction) where gloves are mandatory. My compromise solution is to wear close-fitting fingerless carpenter's gloves (deWalt or Stanley) which still protect the palm, backs of hands and upper fingers whilst leaving my fingers free to feel the work - very important when undertaking tasks like intensive driving of screws where the fingers of normal gloves can easily be caught by swarf attached to screws
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Everything else I knew from your list but I newer thought that tight fiting neopren coated glows would be a risk. I have thought it so that I have a better feel to the wood when sawing. In winter the skin is dry and my hand might slip when pushin the wood towards the saw blade
 
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