Router Forums banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a newbie eager to learn. I just bought my first Rourter and bought it from the Millright company, by the way an excellent company and very serious in their deliveries. In my country it is difficult to locate Bits in the local market and I need everyone's experience.
What dou you recommend?
 

·
Marine Engineer
Doug
Joined
·
4,945 Posts
I may be in the minority opinion, but I don't like "sets" of router bits. I would recommend getting a few bits based on the projects you are doing and then add more. Start with a straight bit, a flush trim bit, a round over, and maybe a pattern bit.

I bought a 30 bit set when I started off years ago and realized that at least 30% of them were really not essential.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,032 Posts
I agree mostly with Doug when it comes to large sets like the one I bought at MCLS. But then again for what I paid for the "damaged case" set was about what I would have spent on the maybe 5-6 bits that I do use from time to time and I got a fair number of ones I've used only occasionally so there may be that advantage as well but I expect there will be at least some that never get put in the collet. Then there are the smaller sets that companies like Whiteside have that may have say 3 dado bits sized specifically for plywood, door frame stile and rail sets, or some of these sets depending on your needs/interests. But sets like the 66 piece set that some have, not so much unless it's at a closeout price and they are quality bits. Just add up what the ones you know you'll use and see if it makes sense. Could be a good deal or wasted $$ for bits not to be used. More isn't better some times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
I'm with Doug on this one. I bought a big set when I first started and probably have only used 15% of them over the years. I would concentrate on what you are going to build, and go from there. A few straight bits, a few round over bits, flush trim bit, and maybe a pattern trim bit. If you want to do profiles, maybe an ogee bit or something similar. If you start with a few bits, stay with quality bits from a reputable company. They will serve you well. Buy only as you need for a project and you will not have a drawer full of bits that never get used.
 

·
Premium Member
Frank
Joined
·
352 Posts
I agree with Doug. My first bits were straight and round-over bits from MCLS. These are good bits, but not the quality of Freud. I usually try to buy a quality bit that meets the needs of the project.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,813 Posts
Maybe twenty years ago I bought a set of bits that had multiple sizes of the same bit. A few straight bits and a few roman ogee a few round over etc. I bought the set because I was tired of buying bits every time I needed a slight variation from what I already had. With these sets, you get everything you need and save money at the same time. They aren't the quality of the big name brands but they do the same job. After a while, you will find that there are certain bits you routinely use. For those bits, you can spend the extra money and get a brand name if you feel it is needed. For me the only time I do that is for specialty bits like rail and stile bits. I still use my cheapo set and have never regretted buying them. if you don't have a good assortment of bits then your work will suffer. You will get by with a profile because that is all you have and you won't want to wait until you get a new bit to finish the job. Buy a big set and consider it money well spent. In twenty years you won't have any idea how much you spent nor will you care.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,813 Posts
One more thing you said, "In my country it is difficult to locate Bits in the local market" which is even more of a reason to get a set versus individual bits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you all for your recommendations. As you learn, I want to try a little of everything. I found these set in Freud, but in the country I can buy it through woodcraft or Tool doctor. the first us $ 200 and the second us $ 150, what do you think?
396569
396570
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,813 Posts
Pretty much worthless. You want something that you can use on the edge of the boards. These are for cutting grooves of sorts into the surface of the boards. Take a look at MLCS or Amazon and see what kits they have. Be sure you get the right size for your router. They come in 1/2" 1/4" and metric sizes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hi. ok. I need them for a CNC Router, and the tasks to be carried out are: engraving, grooving, caging, lithophanes and letter paths for posters. To finish the contour I can use a manual router and for that type of router if I find tools locally. I hope I have explained well because my English is not good.
Fixture Tints and shades Window covering Paper Visual arts Wood Relief Art Artifact Ancient history Wood Flowerpot Wall Art Houseplant Artifact Circle Stone wall History Ancient history Product Circle Rectangle Still life photography Composite material Material property Design Natural material Rectangle Text Font Handwriting Commemorative plaque Memorial
 

·
Marine Engineer
Doug
Joined
·
4,945 Posts
Whiteside and Amana also have decent sets.

If you are just doing signs and such, a 60 and 90 degree v bit are a must. Also a few sizes of spiral bits to cut pockets and profiles. If you plan on 3D work, a 1/8" ballnose is a good start.

If you are just starting out, I would recommend cheaper bits. You are going to break a few as you get up to speed. Better to snap a few $12 Chinese spiral bits than a $30 Freud based on my experience....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
This probably won't help much, but when I started I got a kit set for the same reasons other people have said; recently I bought one or two high quality bits individually and I must say the difference is considerable. So it might be worth a kit to just get started and figure out what you need but don't spend a lot of money; and replace with individual quality bits when you can.
 

·
Registered
Theo
Joined
·
7,182 Posts
When I want/need a different type of bit, I buy a cheap one off of ebay, to see if it does what I need. If not, I choose another. But, if it does what I want, then I spend some money to get a better bit. I will not buy an entire set of bits, I would much rather do it my way. And, for what I do, I only have about 5 varieties of bits, and they do just what I want them to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
thank you
I'll take all your advice, I'll start with inexpensive individual bits to try.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,912 Posts
Just buy the bits you need, buy good quality bits, they cost more but work better and last longer, sets are full of bits you will never use and these sets are not the top quality bits you think they are. N
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Estoy comprando las brocas individualmente y tengo una pregunta, ¿cuál es la diferencia entre la broca en V y la ranura en V? Entiendo que el primero es para grabados y el segundo es para ranurado, entiendo para qué sirve el segundo pero no tengo claro el primero, agradezco un ejemplo.
Gracias
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I am buying the bits individually and I have a question, what is the difference between the V-bit and the V-groove? I understand that the first is for engravings and the second is for grooving, I understand what the second is used for but I am not clear about the first, I appreciate an example.
thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Get a cheap set of bits off ebay. Consider them expendables. Get some scrap wood. change the bits and have fun.
learn about bit height. it has interesting effects. learn off the cheap ones how to use the router, Learn how feed rate changes with speed. if you burn a bit - who cares? And you will burn a bit learning. You will burn wood, You will notch wood. but you will learn how to use the bits and then you can get the good ones.

the bits, the wood and the feed rate all interact.Cut grooves, pockets, cut up, cut down. cut inside corners, cut outside corners, cut circlkes. use fences, Just experiment.

The old sages are right. when you need a bit for a project get the good one. Pay the bucks for the good bits. But until you are a sage, get a cheap set and practice on 2X4, plywood, particle board, plexiglass...

Just have fun, AlWAYS BE CAREFUL _ OBSERVE SAFETY PRECAUTIONS - experiment with the cheap set on scrap wood. Remember a lack of caution can cut a finger or two.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top