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Discussion Starter #1
I made these four trivets using some walnut for the runners. The 3/8" dowel rods are: Birch, Cherry, Mahogany, Maple, and Red Oak.
They are 6" X 6" X 15/!6" tall. I finished them with mineral oil.
They looked to boxed in, so I beveled the runners, and the ends of the dowels.

I have been wanting to make some for some time, finally. I was going to give two of them away, my wife did not want me to. So I will keep these. Not hard to make. I think they turned out nice.
 

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now those are different and well done...
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you. I have seen the great work that all of you have posted. This is really nice to be
acknowledged by such talent.
I am also working on a portable front vise that can be surface clamped. I will post it soon.
There are many designs out there of trivets. I wanted to make it all wood, something a
little different. I will make more.

Ellery Becnel
 

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Very nice work. For those with stone counters, these are not going to do any damage, AND keep the heat off.
 

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Very nice...unique...
 

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Ellery they are very nice indeed, and the construction in wood, as it would be on metal principles, gives very impressive results. Did you make the rods yourself? If you did, and without a lathe, I would like to hear the technique. Then, how did you stabilize them on the grooves - if you used metal bits, or glue only. Given some modifications because I work with cypress only. I think they make exceptional presents without demanding too much construction. Congratulations !
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks again to everyone!
Hello Dimitri, I purchased the 3/8" dowel rods. I was going to use just Birch, which is common everywhere. Woodcraft had a sale, I also purchased a few other items to offset the shipping cost. I tell that to myself so I can continue shopping. I used my Incra original positioner to locate the grooves across the width of a 4" wide Black Walnut board 6 1/8" long. I used a 3/16" radius core bit to cut the grooves using a backer board, no tearout. I sanded both edges of the groove to make sure the stock sat down flat on each pass. Then I used the bandsaw to cut 4, 1" strips. I used a very sharp low angle block plane to cleanup the bandsaw marks. It worked great, no tearout. I planed the edge each time before bandsawing. Then I cut some 3/4" wide X 5/16" thick pieces of cedar to use as clamping cauls. Much softer than the dowels, no impressions when clamping. I used Titebond II, glue only. They were too square, so I beveled the runners, and the dowels with my benchtop Rigid oscillating sander. They are all wood, no metal.
 

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Pretty cool idea Ellery, and well executed! When I first looked at the picture I thought that you had just drilled the holes in a block of wood, then cut through the middle of the holes to make both sides.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I thought about doing that, but I figured that I would lose to much stock cleaning up the saw marks. This way I could dial in the depth that I wanted. It took a while to get my idea together. I like to think it through when it is a new project. I think the smartest thing I discovered was to cut the grooves across, like a dado cut. That way when I cut it into strips, the 1" pieces would not snap or break. The end grain is on the ends. Originally I was going to cut it along the length. That would have made it very weak. I thought about making them 12" long, but everything made more sense to make them smaller. Smaller dishes, my tooling, clamping setups, more rigid, easier storage, and two or more can be used for larger pans.

Thanks for the feedback.
 
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