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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's kind of hard getting the bits in my PC 895 router. Yes, I have cleaned it. :wink: Are the collets the same for the 895 and the 690 routers? I would think so but I am not sure. I have a Muscle Chuck but I just don't like it. I have been using for a little over and took it off a few weeks ago. I wish someone would make a collet that had more quality built into it.
 

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It's kind of hard getting the bits in my PC 895 router. Yes, I have cleaned it. :wink: Are the collets the same for the 895 and the 690 routers? I would think so but I am not sure. I have a Muscle Chuck but I just don't like it. I have been using for a little over and took it off a few weeks ago. I wish someone would make a collet that had more quality built into it.
Don, would you please let us know why you don't like the MUSCLECHUCK, each of my three 1/2" routers have MUSCLECHUCKS and I would NEVER go back to the original chucks that's why I'm so interested is knowing what the problem is with yours.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Don, would you please let us know why you don't like the MUSCLECHUCK, each of my three 1/2" routers have MUSCLECHUCKS and I would NEVER go back to the original chucks that's why I'm so interested is knowing what the problem is with yours.
Harry, the reason is vibration. I have turned it every which way but loose :wink: to try and get rid of the vibration but I am having no luck. Another reason is I can get the router up further so I can change bits easier.
 

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Try not tightening so much of the MC to the router spindle Don. I just got one recently and I'm able to measure runout. I had more when I over torqued the MC to the router. It came within reasonable limits when I backed off. I still had to rotate it to a few positions to find the sweetest spot.
 

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I am very surprised, try what Charles has suggested, I've never heard of such a problem that hasn't been resolved using by doing exactly that. The MUSCLECHUCKS are made to very tight tolerances on state of the art CNC machines.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I am very surprised, try what Charles has suggested, I've never heard of such a problem that hasn't been resolved using by doing exactly that. The MUSCLECHUCKS are made to very tight tolerances on state of the art CNC machines.
Okay, Harry, I will try what Charles suggested. I will have to agree with you it has a look of quality. I have heard from several people that they have had vibration. On theirs, the vibration goes away when they rotate it.
 

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Don you can go on the MC website and watch the video of John DeRosa installing one. That's why I thought I might have tightened it too much by watching him do it. When I loosened it up a bit I dropped the runout from about 9 thou down to 3 or less.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Try not tightening so much of the MC to the router spindle Don. I just got one recently and I'm able to measure runout. I had more when I over torqued the MC to the router. It came within reasonable limits when I backed off. I still had to rotate it to a few positions to find the sweetest spot.
I did do a test today and the vibration gets worse when you tighten the MC too much. The PC chuck had no vibration.
 

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Neither did my Hitachi but I kept getting bits stuck in it which is why I switched to the MC.
 

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I wonder if over-tightening has damaged the chuck.

DIRECTIONS FOR USE AND VIBRATION REDUCTION PROCEDURE
(USE THE REDUCTION PROCEDURE ONLY IF NECESSARY)
There are many factors, especially at high rotational speeds, that can cause vibration to occur. Ultimately, vibration occurs when mass is distributed non-symmetrically about the axis of rotation. Since all the components of this system (i.e. router spindle, chuck, & cutter) are not perfect, the following procedure is recommended in an effort to minimize any imbalanced condition that may be present.
(1) Remove the guide assembly and install the chuck into the router spindle by tightening the retaining nut. Caution, over tightening the nut beyond 12 Ft-Lbs could damage the retaining rings. Excessive tightening of the nut is not necessary for proper retention of the chuck. Finger tighten the nut then turn it further using a wrench approximately ¼ turn and that will get you close enough.
(2) Install a small typical cutter into the chuck and tighten the cap screw to approximately 100/125 in-lbs. Caution, installing any tool into the chuck less than a diameter of .497 (inch) or over tightening the cap screw beyond 125in-lbs could damage the chuck and/or cause improper operation. Typically, at a torque of 125in-lb, it takes approximately 36/40ft-lbs of torque to cause the tool shank to slip in the chuck so over tightening is not necessary for proper tool retention.
(3) Using any marking device place a mark on the chuck body (not the nut) and the router spindle. Always check to confirm the tool has been secured before turning on the router.
(4) Turn on the router, preferably, if possible, at a low RPM and gradually increase the RPM while observing any significant vibration.
(5) If significant vibration is present, turn off the router and loosen the nut. Then rotate the chuck body through some small angle (45 Deg) relative to the spindle and retighten the nut. Again turn on the router and observe the vibration. If the vibration is reduced repeat this procedure again by continuing to rotate the body in the same direction. If it worsens rotate the body in the opposite direction. Continue this process until an angular position is found that minimizes the vibration. See( Run Out Sources and Corrections) for another set of instructions and a deeper explanation on the web site.
(6) If a large cutter is required then step 5 can be repeated with that actual cutter installed in the chuck.
(7) When a reduction bushing is required it must be installed and the tool retention must be checked before the router is turned on.
(8) Warning: Power tools and their accessories such as the “Musclechuck”tm assembly, should only be used for their intended purpose by users experienced in their operation. Careless handling or misuse may result in serious injury or death. Failure to follow the enclosed directions is a misuse of the “Musclechuck”tm assembly. The user must always make sure that the cutter is secure in the chuck, especially when a reduction busing is required BEFORE turning on the router.
(9) The “Musclechuck” is a high precision device and should be used in that manner. If these instructions are followed the “Musclechuck” will provide you with years of trouble free service.
(10) If any question or problem arises please contact the factory. We will be glad to offer any assistance.
01/20/14
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
John DeRosa called me yesterday (Sunday) and talked with me about my problem. He thinks it might be a bad bearing in the router, but I couldn't feel any movement when I moved the shaft back and forth. I didn't take anything off the router except the collet. I really don't believe it's the router but I could be wrong.

Has anyone got any advice that might help? Mr. DeRosa said I could ship him my collet and he would test it on his equipment. Unless I come up with something else that is what I will do.
 

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test your router for runout...

install a ½x6'' quality drill rod into the router...
measure/test the motor to the base for perpendicular squareness...
rotate the shaft by hand and if the rod measures ''wobble'' you have run out...
faulty bearings and bent shafts causes this...
or you could very briefly turn the router on at slow speed...
if the rod runs true the router is in good shape it's the MC....
if not, it's the tool...
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Okay Stick, I don't have any drill rod but I got the longest shanked WS bit I had and the is what I came up with. The MC had a run out of .0045 and the PC collet was .0013. Opinions please.
 

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test the bit and MC for run out in a drill or another router 1st...
test for runout w/ several different bits...
try different depth settings in the router..
FWIW... having a guaranteed straight drill rod is a major plus in the shop...

how new is your PC???
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Okay Stick and Harry, I don't have any drill rod so I used the longest shanked router bit I had. The MC had a run out of .0045 and the PC collet was .0013. Opinions appreciated.
 

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as I understand it...
bit in the collet = 0.0013 RO...
bit in the MC = 0.0045 RO...
correct???...

did you measure at 0/360, 90, 180 and 270° positions???
did you measure the shaft for run out???
 
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