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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had an air hose to start leaking today and I want to replace it with a good hose that has no memory and will not fight me when I use my 23 and 18 gauge pin nailers. Running these two nailers is all I use the compressor for. I need two 25' hoses so I can air up a tire if I have to. Here is the type of hose I have now.

When not in use the airlines are empty.


 

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stay away from 100% PVC and go w/ rubber like Goodyear's 12674 3/8-inch Rubber Air Hose or Bostitch's BTFP72334 3/8-inch PVC/Rubber Blend Air Hose...
but just the same, I really like my Polyurethane air hoses..
light, no drag and easy to repair...
 

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If you only need to run nail guns with the hose, 1/4 inch will carry the load. It's very light and flexible too.

However, if you only use your air compressor to run nail guns, you're missing half the fun! I have air piped in to several places around my shop, especially in the ceiling in the middle of the room. I have one of those curly hoses that's useless for anything else hanging there with a blow gun on the end of it. It's a great way to move sawdust from someplace you don't want it to some OTHER place you don't want it. It's become quite the habit to just reach up and grab the blower to clear dust off machinery. Yes, I know it puts more dust in the air and I've been trying to wean myself off it, but it's just too convenient.
 

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Don,

That's a big compressor to run small nail guns ! I have a big one that I use mostly for non woodworking related tasks mostly mechanical and have a 50' reel on the wall near the garage door and two other hoses hanging near there. The compressor is also on wheels so I can move easily but I can't plug it just anywhere, it needs at least a 20 Amp breaker, and on the shelf under my workbench I have a smaller one for these nail guns. On both compressors I use a rubber spiral hose because it is light extendible and always goes back to it's original shape. I tried a few less expensive plastic spirals, but if yo use them when it's cold, they crack or break.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Don,

That's a big compressor to run small nail guns ! I have a big one that I use mostly for non woodworking related tasks mostly mechanical and have a 50' reel on the wall near the garage door and two other hoses hanging near there. The compressor is also on wheels so I can move easily but I can't plug it just anywhere, it needs at least a 20 Amp breaker, and on the shelf under my workbench I have a smaller one for these nail guns. On both compressors I use a rubber spiral hose because it is light extendible and always goes back to it's original shape. I tried a few less expensive plastic spirals, but if yo use them when it's cold, they crack or break.

Dan, in the past I have always had trouble with spiral hoses because they get tangled up and kinked. Do you have that same problem or are they making them better now?
 

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"I want to replace it with a good hose that has no memory and will not fight me"

Don, I think we are all looking for air lines like this. I would suggest going with rubber lines for general use. They will remain the most flexible at the widest temperature range and will last longer than the plastic versions. I only use the plastic spring coiled type air lines where hung above my work areas. The rest of the air lines are soft copper or rubber "extension cord" type air lines for general use. I found and bought several 25' rubber 3/8" ID American Brand Name air hoses at Harbor Freight (of course made in China) that are holding up well so far. They are now about 4 years old and looking like they will last years more.I added quick connect male and female fittings to them so they are now kind of "extension cords" for air.

My 80 gallon 5 hp air compressor is located in a shed roof addition on the side of my shop. I put it out there for noise and space requirements. Just inside the shop I located the main air filter and regulator that supplies the air to my shop. They are mounted on the wall just inside the shop. From this regulator I piped my shop with soft copper lines to the most commonly needed locations around my shop and have quick connect fittings at each location. This allows me to plug in and use a short air line when and where ever needed. I also have ceiling mounted connections above my work benches and tools that are not near a wall. These overhead lines each have a short rubber air line hanging from the ceiling to a quick connect fitting within arms reach of me when standing under one of them. A short spring coiled nylon air line is plugged into each one of them with a quick connect fitting on the bottom end of it, and an air gun is plugged into it. I attached a loop wire hanger at the bottom end of each of the rubber air lines at it's quick connect fitting, so I can hang the hook of the air gun from it. This keeps each air line and air gun
out of the way when not being used, but easy to reach when needed. I can pop off the air gun and plug in an air tool, or pop the quick connect at the end of the short rubber air line and connect a long rubber hose if I need to use air some distance from that location, or I can plug the long air line into any of the wall outlets. If I need lower air pressure than the 100 psi setting that I run all of my shop lines at, I have a couple of portable pressure regulators with male and female quick connect fittings, so I can plug one of them into any location and have lower regulated air for that purpose. Air brushes and paint spray equipment usually require 30-40 psi. Air clamps are another low air pressure requirement, and easily used at lower air pressure wherever needed.

For "away from the shop" air needs I have a Junn Air mushroom type portable air compressor. It's only 4 cfm, but amazingly quiet and adequate for air brushing and smaller nail gun use. It goes to trade shows and demonstrations when I will need compressed air. It's about as loud as a refrigerator, so not even noticed by anyone when it's under the table and running.

Charley
 

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For Flexibility and dementia +1 for the rubber hose. Blend and poly hoses last longer than rubber. Not familiar with Flexzilla.
 

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Plus one more for Flexilla. I’ve used rubber in the past and They aren’t much different. I also like the bright colour and I’m hoping it’s more durable in the long term.
 

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Don,

The hoses that kink and break are the plastic ones. The rubber ones are great.
They cost more but are worth it because they don't break as easily and usually last a very long time.

Dan
 

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My rubber hoses are over thirty years old. I never leave them with air pressure in them when they're not being used, and they're always indoors out of the sunlight.
I think they must be due for replacement (as am I).
 
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