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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I would like to find the speed of an old router I picked-up years ago. The base (moter bracket) still has an ID tag that reads: Stanley type - model 92937.02. However I have not found anything for a Stanley router with that model. It takes a 1/2" bit.

I would like to know the speed of this router, so I can use it safely.

Thank you, Jay.
 

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Theo
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OK, I'm puzzled. What does knowing what the speed is have to do with using it safely? I've got five old Craftsman routers, don't know the speed of any of them, and have used them safely for years.
 

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It probably doesn't have the power to drive a huge bit, for example, panel bits anyway. You're likely to use bits up to an 1", maybe a bit bigger handheld or in a table so whatever its speed it's going to be less than the max of the bit.

If you're planning on spinning something like a panel cutter then this is not the router for it.

If you plan on using it for edge profiling (ogee, roundover, slot cutter, etc) it should be okay.

Make sure of other things like runout, bearing problems, shaft wear, etc... to make sure you minimize vibrations.

Also check brushes and commutator as dirty brushes may cause varying speeds which would not be good.

Good luck with it...
 
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Deleted text...placed in wrong thread...sorry
 

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Deleted text...placed in wrong thread...sorry
I agree with everything that Nick said, Do not try to use large bits in this router. In the time period these were used, they did all the larger profiles with a shaper. Routers were designed at first to routing small profiles by a hand held machine. They are under rated compared to modern routers, and will not hold up to the large bits produced today.

Herb
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hey thanks guys. These are some good thoughts. I was thinking it might be a M1-a, R5A or R5B, maybe a R518. And with the grey-green paint, it might be from the 60s.

A couple guys at a wood-working store suggested that it might be running at 18,000 rpm (or possibly higher). Only the R518 moves slow enough to be OK.

Regardless, I'm not comfortable putting a 2-1/4" bit in this old router. It is for slot cutting some flooring. Great tips on the bearings, shaft wear and vibrations.
 

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