Router Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,603 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am making a "Breakfast Tray" and the sides are splayed 15*. I want to use box joints and I am having trouble getting them to fit. The guy that has the plans on Amazon and you can watch a video free if you have Prime. If I can I will put a link below. Joining the rail start in the video at 19:55 minutes. There is one back and two side rails that are splayed 15* out on the bottom plus cut at 15* on one end on the sides and for the back, it's cut at 15* on both ends. Here are some pictures. These are test cuts and I know the back is too tall and will have to be cut to size. I have tried to give all the information you might need but it seems I don' give enough so ask away and I will try to answer them. Thanks



Well, I can't get but one picture uploaded. It must be the computer because I know it's not me. :wink:






https://www.amazon.com/Woodcademy/dp/B071JQ23QH/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8#nav-top
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
do the heels of the sockets have a 15 degree kant...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,603 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No Stick, they don't. Looking at the video again I think he was having the same problem and he just let it go. I don't see any way of doing at an angle in the sockets.
 

·
Registered
Theo
Joined
·
7,182 Posts
I don't do fancy work like that. But, if I were going to want something with splayed sides and joints, I think I'd start with a oversize squared piece, cut the joints, then angle cut the piece, splaying it that way. Never tried it, but off-hand can't think of any reason it wouldn't work. At least that's the way I'd try it.

Hmm, I can't figure if that would leave little square holes or not. But even if it did I think I'd still go with it, and fill the holes with black epoxy or something. Then if anyone asked I'd just tell them that was part of the design, and intentional.

Even better. This should answer your questions. Just choose your weapon. https://www.google.com/search?ei=Rr...0....1..gws-wiz.......0i71j33i299.tgcp-pfoFMs
I love google.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,603 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, Theo. This video shows the correct way it needs to be done. I just don't think I want to try and make a jig like that for this one project. I may just butt joint the ends and put a couple of small dowels for strength. What do you think about that?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,956 Posts
Thanks, Theo. This video shows the correct way it needs to be done. I just don't think I want to try and make a jig like that for this one project. I may just butt joint the ends and put a couple of small dowels for strength. What do you think about that?
That is what I would,and have done in the same situation/ or miter it an a compound miter joint.
Herb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
No Stick, they don't. Looking at the video again I think he was having the same problem and he just let it go. I don't see any way of doing at an angle in the sockets.
use a wedge to angle the board in the jig..
straight cut the sockets per say and over cut the tail length a fuzz...
assemble...
trim the tails to fit...
 

·
Registered
Theo
Joined
·
7,182 Posts
Thanks, Theo. This video shows the correct way it needs to be done. I just don't think I want to try and make a jig like that for this one project. I may just butt joint the ends and put a couple of small dowels for strength. What do you think about that?
I like it. K.I.S.S. triumphs again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,290 Posts
@Stick486 has the way.

I haven't tried this with the I-Box jig, at least not yet, but you should be able to make a wedge and attach it to the sacrificial strip in the I-Box jig, to keep your work held at the correct angle during the cutting process. I have made a bunch of spare sacrificial strips for my I-Box jig and would not hesitate to modify one of them for this purpose. I used the original sacrificial strip as a template and cut about 16 more from a 2' X 4' piece of 1/4" MDF that I purchased at Home Depot for about $5. About an hour later I had made enough for my I-Box jig to likely last me the rest of my lifetime.

My "Kyrmi Original Mini Fence" jig (another form of box joint jig) came with wedge shaped fence pieces to use with the miter gauge on the table saw to allow doing this when making 5, 6, and 8 sided boxes. There isn't one ready made in the set for a 15 deg angle, but it should be possible to do this when using that jig as well.

An I-Box jig should also be capable of this if the needed wedge is made for it. You could either trim the work at the angle before cutting the box joints, or just cut the box pins longer than needed and trim the excess off after assembly. A little extra pin length on box joints, trimmed off after gluing and assembly, always produces the best result.

Please post photos of your attempt and success.

Charley
 

·
Registered
Oliver (Prof. Henry)
Joined
·
2,228 Posts
Use an angled backer

I made a simple angled backer for my shop-built box joint jig that worked well for making joints on an angle. The angle has to match what it needed for the angle of the sides, and you can see how well the joint look when assembled.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
I made a simple angled backer for my shop-built box joint jig that worked well for making joints on an angle. The angle has to match what it needed for the angle of the sides, and you can see how well the joint look when assembled.
that gets it...
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top