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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The instructions for the wheel kit to be fitted to an Incra (oblong) router table, state that the movable wheel should be fitted at the opposite end to the feed. I can see why this is, because having the wheel, bracket and pedal at the feed end could result in a trip hazard - especially dangerous when hands might be near the cutter.

I wonder if anyone uses their table with the movable wheel at the feed end and whether it does cause issues?

I have limited space in the shop and sometimes need to rotate the table from its normal parked position, to allow for long workpieces. Due to the limited parking space, it would be much easier to rotate the table from the left-hand end.

If it's thought to be really unsafe, I could consider fitting modified brackets at the feed end with rotatable casters fitted with brakes, but I've always considered that either fixed wheels or lowering onto fixed feet was more stable.
 

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I don't have an Incra Router Table, but I do have a DeWalt Planer with two fixed wheels and a single rotatable wheel on the opposite side that can be lowered to put the table on the ground. The rotatable wheel is on the output side. If it were on the input side it would definitely cause me great problems. I suggest you follow the recommendation of the manufacture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't have an Incra Router Table, but I do have a DeWalt Planer with two fixed wheels and a single rotatable wheel on the opposite side that can be lowered to put the table on the ground. The rotatable wheel is on the output side. If it were on the input side it would definitely cause me great problems. I suggest you follow the recommendation of the manufacture.
Your planer sounds like the same system that Incra have used, but there the similarity ends, as the input and output ends are in different planes.
There's no recommendation by the manufacturer. You either use the table without wheels or fit a set, as I have done.
The swivelling castor, which raises the wheel to allow the table to sit on fixed legs, is not on the input or output end. The fixed wheels (without brakes) are on the input/output end.
One solution would be similar to that used by Shopsmith (maybe others) where there is a raising/lowering foot lever at both ends of the machine, each one controlling movement of two rotatable castors. This allows "steering" to take place from either end, which makes placement very easy.
 
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