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I don't own one for my TS but do have the router table version. The accuracy and repeatability are pretty amazing. Don't know if templates matter for the TS but on the router table, it really upped my game. The microadjust feature is really worthwhile to me. makes it easy to sneak up on the exact cut. No more bump-n-nudge.

I think the one issue to understand is that to get a 52" cut to the right of the blade, you will need an additional 8-9" for the base mount and the width of the fence itself. Probably not a small shop accessory.

In general, I am an Incra fan. They produce really great stuff. It's not in the "old iron, super solid construction" way of shop equipment so some people consider their stuff flimsy.
 

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Hi Joe,
Everybody that follows my threads and posts know that I perk up anytime that the name "Incra" comes up.

When I first got into woodworking a few years ago, the second thing that I bought after a table saw was the Incra LS TS 52" version.

I just can't imagine working without it now, it does "everything" that Incra says that it will.

It is capable of accuracy that is far more than is what you need for woodworking, but I like that. You may need to recalibrate the scale from time to time due to, for example changing blades and how picky you are about the calibration.

Even though I have the 52" version, I cannot get that much distance between the fence and the blade. This is due to two things. First, my saw has a ten inch cast iron wing on the left side of the blade and I have my router table installed to the far left of rails, these two issues limit the maximum space between the blade and the fence to about 30". This limitation, in my case, is not a problem for me as I seldom need the extra space.

When I need to cut large pieces such as a sheet of plywood I use my circular saw with a guide which works just fine even if it is a bit of a PITB to set up before making the cut.

As most people that know me, know that I added the 17" LS system to the left of the blade to work with the router. The 17" LS system can easily be lifted off of the rails when not in use and replaced to its' original position on the rails with a set of stops, but if a person does not wish to spend the extra money for the 17" system the one for the TS can be moved down the rails to work just fine with the router. The set up is great for joinery work as is demonstrated at the Incra website. You can add the "Wonder Fence" and have a very versatile set up.

Joe you will never be sorry if you elect to spend the money for the Incra LS TS set up.

That's my opinion on the matter, but there are a lot of very good woodworkers that get by just fine without the Incra system. It's one of those things where to each his own is applicable as is the case with so many issues.

Jerry
 

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As soon as I have the space, I will be adding one to my table saw.

I have had their router fence for longer than I care to remember. I still have it and it is the most reliable and repeatable fence I have ever used. Being able to make fine adjustments is the real icing on the cake. I am sooo tired of loosening the fence, giving her a tap, check, repeat. Being able to adjust within a thousands of an inch at any time is something I can really appreciate.

And if you do not like it, you can make me a really good deal on it!>:)
 

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I read some people complain about to much deflection . I do believe it has turn knobs to tighten each end of the fence if you find this is a issue though
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Thanks! I bought the components to build a huge panel saw, which will BE built "one day" when I am motivated to get into a large project like that. It allows for 100" of slide, and will let a user rip a 4x8 panel that is standing on end! I have to weld up the frame and such for it, so it is just a matter of tome, and motivation.

I really liked this INCRA table saw accessory though.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Wow I can't wait to see this panel saw !
I couldn't think of the name earlier. Chalk it up to old age.

I bought the SAW TRAX unit. It is actually 100", not 110". I bought it a few years ago and have not yet built the frame for it.

SAW TRAX KIT



I also bought the ROUTER slide.



I am going to use this basic frame design



BUT I am going to give it a little more muscle. My vertical panel saw will be able to lay flat at waist level for flat cuts. It will have ten feet of frame to each side of the saw rail, so when laid flat, it will also serve as a table saw, except that the blade will move while the material lays stationary. I am also going to make the entire rail system rotate at the base so I will be able to cut any angle from 90 degrees to 45 degrees, and in either direction. So I will be able to cut up to a 4x6 sheet diagonally.

I like to over-engineer things!
 

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I couldn't think of the name earlier. Chalk it up to old age.

I bought the SAW TRAX unit. It is actually 100", not 110". I bought it a few years ago and have not yet built the frame for it.

I also bought the ROUTER slide.
that should make a great ski...
 

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I think the one issue to understand is that to get a 52" cut to the right of the blade, you will need an additional 8-9" for the base mount and the width of the fence itself. Probably not a small shop accessory.
I'm a big fan of Incra products. I have never used the table saw fence but my thoughts are probably confirmed by PhilBa. The wider rip you are making the more room you will need with this fence. That arm really sticks out on the right side.
 

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Joe, Before you go making your panel saw, have you looked at track saws? You can cut a 4x8 sheet without having to move it to the saw, you take the saw to it. You just set up support (saw horses or 3" foam on the ground or what ever), slide the sheet on to it (right off the truck), attach the track and cut. For a 4x8 3/4" MDF at about 100 lbs, it's a godsend. Great for plywood, too. Also, you can do the finished cut with the track saw - no more trimming after breaking down the sheet. The track saw is also useful for lots of other cuts. I trimmed 1/2" off the bottom of a painted interior door - so clean it didn't need touch up. I used it to cut a slab to size for my entry table.

As long as I'm on the track saw track - because I do my sheet goods as they come in, I don't really need a super wide table saw. I never liked pushing a 4x8 sheet across the top of a TS anyway. So maybe the limitation on the Incra fence isn't so bad.

The track saw really does change the game.
 

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Incra Tools

I do not have a lot of the Incra tools and accessories, but those that I do have, I certainly do like and use as often as possible. Not found a problem with any yet.
 

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I concur with Jerry Bowen's post 100%.

RainMan1, as mentioned it has a clamp on the front rail but I rarely use it because it's just not needed normally, it's pretty solid as is. If worse comes to worse one can lock it AND the one on the rear rail. If that's not enough, another piece of equipment is definitely in order.
 

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I concur with Jerry Bowen's post 100%.

RainMan1, as mentioned it has a clamp on the front rail but I rarely use it because it's just not needed normally, it's pretty solid as is. If worse comes to worse one can lock it AND the one on the rear rail. If that's not enough, another piece of equipment is definitely in order.

I suppose that there may well be times that the lock down clamps for the fence may not be enough but right now I just can't imagine a situation when that would be needed.

Jerry
 

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I have an Incra fence on my table saw and use it everyday. I love it. I have the 3' one vs the 52" one. It does everything that I would want it to do. I make a lot of small boxes and without the accuracy of the adjustment of this fence I would have a difficult time. Malcolm / Kentucky USA
 

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Thanks! I bought the components to build a huge panel saw, which will BE built "one day" when I am motivated to get into a large project like that. It allows for 100" of slide, and will let a user rip a 4x8 panel that is standing on end! I have to weld up the frame and such for it, so it is just a matter of tome, and motivation.

I really liked this INCRA table saw accessory though.
(My disclaimer-- if there is something I say in the following post that you don't understand or want to know more about, just ask me. I wanted to cover many things, so summarized many parts.)

I love my panel saw. Well worth it for me when I migrated from a cabinet saw to my panel saw.

I have the Incra system for router and also use it as a parallel fence on my sliding table on the panel saw...

Having said that, and being in the trades... I feel compelled to throw out a few observations on this. Some of the adages of this forum from years past still hold true today. When the founders of the Router Workshop had their TV Series, they held to the concept that it was hard to beat simple, for speed and flexibility.

I have my Incra System, and for the router, use it rarely. On the router, it is great for repeat-ability and dialing in something for accuracy. (dovetails, finger joints, box joints, spline joints, etc.) On other things, hard to beat a simple fence with quick-clamps.

On my panel saw, I use my Incra System even less often.

Sometimes having something with dial-in accuracy tends to lead the user to chase down the numbers, instead of just doing what needs to be done. I know I have been doing this a awhile and have an eye for some things. My apprentices know not to do some of the things that I just eyeball or free-hand cut. It takes practice and a bit of confidence in what you are doing.

But when you need the accuracy... it is available. For me, a good, sturdy rip fence that it easy to move, set and lock-down. Albiet, my panel saw is over 1300 pounds. My rip fence is maybe 50 pounds. But unlocked, I can move it (glides) with my pinky. It locks solidly. It adjusts various ways, for various cuts and applications. I know where zero is (and can trust that). It has a micro-adjust. If you look at my older threads on my Rockwell, it had a Bies type rip fence that I fabricated. Had pretty much the same features (in basic functionality).

But, as I've said many times here, most of my TS cuts (about 80-90 percent) are not with the rip fence. Most my cuts with my cabinet saws and with this panel saw, are and were cross-cut fences and sleds.

I like having about 53" of table to the right of the blade. I love my sliding table, and now wonder how I lived without it before!!! I have 2, 4, 6 and 8 foot crosscut fences. I don't mount my outrigger table unless I need it. I have a miter table attachment, as well as having the same type of positive stop miter fixtures on my outrigger table.

My accessory support table, I drilled to mount my Incra System (router) as a parallel fence. I have another parallel fence that mounts in that same holes, that is faster, but does not incrementally accurate (I measure and set). With all the accessories mounted to my panel saw, it takes up a lot of real estate. More working room around it-- to use it, and to work around it. Space in my shop is premium and I have to reclaim it when needed. (if my shop was just 5 feet wider... lol)

I had been planning to drill out my outfeed table for another table mounted router... but I already have 3 router tables. And I remembered that the one I had on the Rockwell, was mostly in the way. (Hardly used it // used the other router tables instead.)

For me, I need things to be adaptable and flexible. That way I can do many things, as the need arises. I plan my workflow and adapt my tooling to that flow. This leads me into a fixed TS fence system such as the Incra TS... I looked into using it on my and opted out. For me, if mounted permanently, would have held me back, and I would have lost some of my adaptability.

Pick your battles. Work smartly. Research what you want to do and what you need to do. Invest your money wisely were you think it will make a difference. My saw was about $6k retail. I've got about another 6k in extra attachments and such. Took a lifetime of saving for me. I think it is worth it for me. But even then, it has not paid for itself yet. That is not practical nor wise for others.

I still have my jobsite and cabinet TS'es. Not like I couldn't do something without the panel saw, but having good tooling saves so much work and is such a pleasure to use. It takes less work and time getting something to from bulk stock, to finish grade and finished dimensions.

As for an Incra System- A number of users who buy, end up reselling it. They don't seem to learn to use it, or don't use it to it's capabilities. That seems to be why there are so many, from time to time on CL. It's a personal choice, that you really need to invest your time on to learn how to use it.

That goes for any tooling. Learn to use it,. Practice. Learn it inside and out. Learn the possibilities of what you do with what you have. If you can't do something, figure out a way that you can.
 
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