Router Forums banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,909 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm about to bite the bullet and spend $109 on a DeWalt 18 volt battery. However I see that I can get a new 20 volt impact driver , two new batteries and a charger for $99.00. The drawback is that the batteries are only 1.3 amp hr. Has anyone used the 1.3 amp hr batteries and if so what is the downside.

DEWALT ATOMIC 20-Volt MAX Cordless Brushless Compact 1/4 in. Impact Driver, (2) 20-Volt 1.3Ah Batteries, Charger & Bag DCF809C2 (homedepot.com)
Another option is the Ridgid 18volt with one 2 amp hr battery for the same price BUT the battery and tool are guaranteed for life.
RIDGID 18V Cordless 1/4 in. Impact Driver Kit with 2.0 Ah Battery and Charger R86002K (homedepot.com)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,909 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My first thought was to get some aftermarket ones off of Amazon. I was very disappointed in them and returned them yesterday. I did a video on YouTube showing why they weren't suitable. My concern is that the 1.5 amp batteries will not have enough umph when it comes to larger bits Biago mentioned. I had also considered getting a 18 to 20 volt adapter to go from the Rigidi battery to the Dewalt but that combination doesn't seem to exist.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,909 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If those are NiCads why don't you just rebuild them? The rebuild batteries are/were about half the price of a whole new battery.
I've thought about rebuilding myself, there is a lot of information on Youtube, but in the end if they are not as good as originals then I've thrown more good money away. I'm glad I was able to return the ones I bought at Amazon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,909 Posts
Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I made the decision and went with the $99 dollar 20 volt Dewalt. After thinking about it I came up with the same conclusion that John did. I can get an adapter and still use my 18 volt tools and since I have one good 18 volt battery left I can use the hammer drill if I ever need it. I was skeptical about the 1.5 amp hr battery but from what I can tell from my limited use it will work fine. I used the same bit I used in the Youtube video and it went through a 4x4' with ease. I didn't use the same drill as I did but the bottom line is that I was able to make a hole. With the new replacement Amazon batteries that I tried using along with the other drill, it was impossible. To sweeten the deal I had a $25 dollar off coupon from Home Depot. As far as using corded tools I'm with Andy. As I have stated before, how often does the average person need to use a power tool when electricity isn't available? A drill is about the only tool that I reach for regularly that the convivence outweighs the need to plug it in. I would never consider a saw or sander or anything else. And don't get me started on outdoor lawn equipment!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,909 Posts
Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Last year, I bought the DeWalt 20v adapter with (2) L-ion batteries (2.0 amp), instead of replacing my 18v Nicads. One of the batteries wouldn’t hold a charge and the second failed to charge at all. I returned the package and Rockler immediately shipped me a new set, without question. After charging both batteries, I used them with no charging problems, but the usage life was terrible. The battery meter was a plus feature, however it didn’t take long for the 4 lights to decrease, with a deck build. After about 3 months, 1 battery died completely. At that point, the return window was closed and I was told to contact DeWalt for a warranty replacement. What a nightmare with phone prompts, line holds and false promises and out of pocket return shipping costs. If you do decide to chance a purchase of the 20v L-ions, beware of the 18v items they cannot be used with - the DeWalt radio for one, and the work light annoyingly pulsates the beam every second. Truthfully, I wasted money on “pure junk” and will never buy another DeWalt product again. Since my dilemma, I’ve switched to Rigid and have had great luck with their battery tools. But I will say that “corded” is the only way to go for larger projects.
I went with the 20 volt and hope I don't have the same problems that you had. I'm with you on corded tools. I see absolutely no use for a battery tool if electricity is readily available. The only reason I even considered a battery drill and a driver is that it takes longer to get out an extension cord then to drill or drive a screw. Drills are used in out of the way places and they are typically only used for less than a minute at a time. A saw however is typically used for multiple cuts and seldom used when working on a ladder or a hundred feet from the back door. I picked up a corded Dewalt Saturday at a garage sale for $1.00. It needed a new cord but even if I had to buy one it would have been a lot less than $109.00. I am pretty sure that this new $1.00 drill be around for a lot longer than I am. And it will never die in the middle of a job.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top