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Welcome to the forum, JohnM....
 

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I always stick with the manufacturers batteries. The cost more but always seem to last and have proven quality. It is worth the extra money to me. I do not own any Dewalt cordless tools but have many Makita cordless tools and batteries that have always been extremely dependable and long lasting.
I would agree if I hadn't already bought 2 dewalt replacement batteries that failed. So at this point the Amazon batteries either work or I go Makita. So far no Makits...
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I made the decision and went with the $99 dollar 20 volt Dewalt. After thinking about it I came up with the same conclusion that John did. I can get an adapter and still use my 18 volt tools and since I have one good 18 volt battery left I can use the hammer drill if I ever need it. I was skeptical about the 1.5 amp hr battery but from what I can tell from my limited use it will work fine. I used the same bit I used in the Youtube video and it went through a 4x4' with ease. I didn't use the same drill as I did but the bottom line is that I was able to make a hole. With the new replacement Amazon batteries that I tried using along with the other drill, it was impossible. To sweeten the deal I had a $25 dollar off coupon from Home Depot. As far as using corded tools I'm with Andy. As I have stated before, how often does the average person need to use a power tool when electricity isn't available? A drill is about the only tool that I reach for regularly that the convivence outweighs the need to plug it in. I would never consider a saw or sander or anything else. And don't get me started on outdoor lawn equipment!
 

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I made the decision and went with the $99 dollar 20 volt Dewalt. After thinking about it I came up with the same conclusion that John did. I can get an adapter and still use my 18 volt tools and since I have one good 18 volt battery left I can use the hammer drill if I ever need it. I was skeptical about the 1.5 amp hr battery but from what I can tell from my limited use it will work fine. I used the same bit I used in the Youtube video and it went through a 4x4' with ease. I didn't use the same drill as I did but the bottom line is that I was able to make a hole. With the new replacement Amazon batteries that I tried using along with the other drill, it was impossible. To sweeten the deal I had a $25 dollar off coupon from Home Depot. As far as using corded tools I'm with Andy. As I have stated before, how often does the average person need to use a power tool when electricity isn't available? A drill is about the only tool that I reach for regularly that the convivence outweighs the need to plug it in. I would never consider a saw or sander or anything else. And don't get me started on outdoor lawn equipment!
Glad I could help you out, or confirm you made the right choice.
Andy
 

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I'm about to bite the bullet and spend $109 on a DeWalt 18 volt battery. However I see that I can get a new 20 volt impact driver , two new batteries and a charger for $99.00. The drawback is that the batteries are only 1.3 amp hr. Has anyone used the 1.3 amp hr batteries and if so what is the downside.

DEWALT ATOMIC 20-Volt MAX Cordless Brushless Compact 1/4 in. Impact Driver, (2) 20-Volt 1.3Ah Batteries, Charger & Bag DCF809C2 (homedepot.com)
Another option is the Ridgid 18volt with one 2 amp hr battery for the same price BUT the battery and tool are guaranteed for life.
RIDGID 18V Cordless 1/4 in. Impact Driver Kit with 2.0 Ah Battery and Charger R86002K (homedepot.com)
To me a no brainer for the DeWalt driver kit for that price. Go online or Amazon and get a 5 , 5 or 6ah compatible battery for a lot less $. I bought a 6ah off brand and it works great with great power and use time. You`ll find that the 1.3ah DeWalt battery will do just fine for the most part.
 

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Welcome to the forum, tb7117. Is there any other name we can call you by?
 

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I'm about to bite the bullet and spend $109 on a DeWalt 18 volt battery. However I see that I can get a new 20 volt impact driver , two new batteries and a charger for $99.00. The drawback is that the batteries are only 1.3 amp hr. Has anyone used the 1.3 amp hr batteries and if so what is the downside.

DEWALT ATOMIC 20-Volt MAX Cordless Brushless Compact 1/4 in. Impact Driver, (2) 20-Volt 1.3Ah Batteries, Charger & Bag DCF809C2 (homedepot.com)
Another option is the Ridgid 18volt with one 2 amp hr battery for the same price BUT the battery and tool are guaranteed for life.
RIDGID 18V Cordless 1/4 in. Impact Driver Kit with 2.0 Ah Battery and Charger R86002K (homedepot.com)
Last year, I bought the DeWalt 20v adapter with (2) L-ion batteries (2.0 amp), instead of replacing my 18v Nicads. One of the batteries wouldn’t hold a charge and the second failed to charge at all. I returned the package and Rockler immediately shipped me a new set, without question. After charging both batteries, I used them with no charging problems, but the usage life was terrible. The battery meter was a plus feature, however it didn’t take long for the 4 lights to decrease, with a deck build. After about 3 months, 1 battery died completely. At that point, the return window was closed and I was told to contact DeWalt for a warranty replacement. What a nightmare with phone prompts, line holds and false promises and out of pocket return shipping costs. If you do decide to chance a purchase of the 20v L-ions, beware of the 18v items they cannot be used with - the DeWalt radio for one, and the work light annoyingly pulsates the beam every second. Truthfully, I wasted money on “pure junk” and will never buy another DeWalt product again. Since my dilemma, I’ve switched to Rigid and have had great luck with their battery tools. But I will say that “corded” is the only way to go for larger projects.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Last year, I bought the DeWalt 20v adapter with (2) L-ion batteries (2.0 amp), instead of replacing my 18v Nicads. One of the batteries wouldn’t hold a charge and the second failed to charge at all. I returned the package and Rockler immediately shipped me a new set, without question. After charging both batteries, I used them with no charging problems, but the usage life was terrible. The battery meter was a plus feature, however it didn’t take long for the 4 lights to decrease, with a deck build. After about 3 months, 1 battery died completely. At that point, the return window was closed and I was told to contact DeWalt for a warranty replacement. What a nightmare with phone prompts, line holds and false promises and out of pocket return shipping costs. If you do decide to chance a purchase of the 20v L-ions, beware of the 18v items they cannot be used with - the DeWalt radio for one, and the work light annoyingly pulsates the beam every second. Truthfully, I wasted money on “pure junk” and will never buy another DeWalt product again. Since my dilemma, I’ve switched to Rigid and have had great luck with their battery tools. But I will say that “corded” is the only way to go for larger projects.
I went with the 20 volt and hope I don't have the same problems that you had. I'm with you on corded tools. I see absolutely no use for a battery tool if electricity is readily available. The only reason I even considered a battery drill and a driver is that it takes longer to get out an extension cord then to drill or drive a screw. Drills are used in out of the way places and they are typically only used for less than a minute at a time. A saw however is typically used for multiple cuts and seldom used when working on a ladder or a hundred feet from the back door. I picked up a corded Dewalt Saturday at a garage sale for $1.00. It needed a new cord but even if I had to buy one it would have been a lot less than $109.00. I am pretty sure that this new $1.00 drill be around for a lot longer than I am. And it will never die in the middle of a job.
 

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I went with the 20 volt and hope I don't have the same problems that you had. I'm with you on corded tools. I see absolutely no use for a battery tool if electricity is readily available. The only reason I even considered a battery drill and a driver is that it takes longer to get out an extension cord then to drill or drive a screw. Drills are used in out of the way places and they are typically only used for less than a minute at a time. A saw however is typically used for multiple cuts and seldom used when working on a ladder or a hundred feet from the back door. I picked up a corded Dewalt Saturday at a garage sale for $1.00. It needed a new cord but even if I had to buy one it would have been a lot less than $109.00. I am pretty sure that this new $1.00 drill be around for a lot longer than I am. And it will never die in the middle of a job.
Good luck with the 20 volt setup. I noticed with mine, that if the batteries were kept installed in the tool for any length of time, they would run flat. I experimented with removing them after final use to see if that made a difference. Low & behold, I tried the stored batteries a month later and each still had full power. It's a mind-boggler as to what would drain them, if stored while still installed - but my technique worked. Also, as with ANY new L-ion or Nicad battery, the partially-charged battery must be completely drained and recharged to full state, before use. Otherwise, an inadequate charge memory will be stored. I was told this by a tech at a local Interstate Battery shop. I later ran a test with a laptop install of a new L-ion battery, and he was absolutely correct.
 

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All my cordless tools are Dewalt, five 18V Ni-Cd, five 20V Li-Ion. I started buying 20V brushless when my 18V Ni-cad batteries started petering out, as Desert Rat says. At first I bought adapters for my 18V tools, but that set-up doesn't work well with my 18V circular saw, flashlight, or mini-vac. I the found 18V Li-Ion batteries to fit 18V Ni-Cd tools on Amazon for ~$40 without having to fight those adapters. They have the same shape and dims as the 18V Ni-Cd's, hold a charge for at least a couple months, have 5AHr of power, are extra light weight, have the charge indicator, and charge in my 18V charger. I did find they're not very durable. The first one I bought crashed in my recip saw due to vibration. I sent it back for a replacement and bought a second at the same time. I still have both after two years. I just don't use them in any tools that vibrate. For that I left my adapters in and use my 20V batteries.
 

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To the two new members, welcome to the forum. You will find this location to have some of the most generous and knowledgeable people on the planet.

Regarding DeWalt batteries, etc. Personally don't care much for DeWalt. Since the B&D purchase they have experienced much negative commentary. Their 20 volt (of course it is really 18v) is much better than their earlier 18v system. Many of my friends think DeWalt is king of the roost.

Since I have only casual use for tools as a DYI, I have chosen to purchase Ryobi because they are usually less expensive. However, I own nearly all of the Milwaukee 12v system tools. They have worked flawlessly for me. Some of the tools are over 7 years old. All are "fuel" level, meaning they are brushless. I have an 18v Ryobi 23 pin nailer which suits my needs excellently. The rest of my Ryobi are 40 volt yard tools, all have done their assigned job. I think Ryobi's parent company is Milwaukee. I understand that serious users rarely chose Ryobi as they are not exactly top of heap most of time.

Good luck with your choice of DeWalt 20 volt. After some time of hands on use, you could let us know how you evaluate the DeWalt.
 

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My first cordless drill was a Makita in 2003 when Lithium was really new. I still use that drill kit and one of the 3 amp batteries. All 18 volt Makita tools and yard equipment use the same batteries and chargers. They have an excellent repair system and honor their warranty. I've use it twice and I own over a dozen 18 volt tools. There are a lot of cordless tools that will out perform their corded counterparts.
 
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