Router Forums banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I had a request for personalized serving trays for two employee's 50th anniversary with the company. Here is a photo of what I made. The frame is baltic birch and the tray bottom is walnut inlaid with maple. The inlay was a pretty straight forward process and the results were pretty good. The issue that gave me the most problem was chipping of the inlay material. The process I used has a starting cut depth of .1 inch with a flat depth of .2 inch. The first pass was very deep and that's where I think most of the chipping occurred. I used maple thinking it would be a dense, consistent cutting material. I cut the tray ends on my CNC if anyone is interested in the file. The sides were cut on my table saw as was the tray bottom. It was a very simple method for constructing a tray.

Yes, my kitchen is my finishing booth.

Jay
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
John
Joined
·
6,973 Posts
Very nice Jay great job on the inlay
 

·
Registered
Mike
Joined
·
3,959 Posts
Jay they look great! When I do the v-carve inlays I add an offset vector for a roughing cut so the bit doesn't have to force the first cut and possibly cause some chatter. I also edit the cut depth of the v-bit for the inlay and pocket so it is not trying to cut too much at one time.

I do a lot of end-grain inlays in cutting boards and find that the end-grain wood cuts cleaner than the straight grain wood.

I think the 2 most important things with v-carve inlays is not to force the cut and have plenty of clamps ready when gluing.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top