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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Bosch 1617 plunge and fixed kit. I also have an Incra LS router system and the matching magna lock plate and a complete set of the magnetic smaller inserts. (bought it all used of CL with 100 bits)

The Fixed bosch base is mounted in my router table and bit changes and height adjustment is a chore. The above table height adjustment only work when I reach down and unlock the router. The router drops 1/8"-1/4" every time. The adjustment C clip retainer has popped off several times.

I'm trying to decide if I should get the Incra lift or go with a plunge router like a Triton that has above table adjustments.

I currently have one full size router and trim router, bosch 1617 & colt, and often will use the 1617 in table and out. I'll also use it to trim brass for reloading rifle rounds on a press.

Sooo.....if I get the Incra lift I'll likely hunt down a deal on a motor just for the lift eventually. If I go the direction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Let's see, $340 for the lift, $140 for a Bosch motor is $480. $270 or so for a Triton, that's just about $210 difference, not figuring the 1hp difference into the equation. You have to reach under to flip a lever to positively lock the Triton, but not the Master Lift. Precision is about the same, particularly if you're using jigs to set height, say, on a door set of bits. If you're living on a tight budget, that's a significant difference, but if you have income or make money from your tools, it's insignificant. Gets pretty subjective, doesn't it. Sometimes you just want what you want.
Those are the #'s I've been coming up with too. I didn't know the Triton was that less when compared to a lift plus router motor. I could get the Incra lift, $340 shipped, and use my Bosch 1617 for now, however, when I need to do handheld work, I'll have to remove it from the lift which I read can be tedious. Not as easy as removing from the mounted fixed base that it's currently in.

I'll have to see if one of the Incra plates I have can accommodate the Triton. Two came with the used router table I bought. I drilled one for my Bosch 1617 and the other I'm not sure what model it's for.

Since I have the Incra LS system, Incra offset table, and Incra magnalock plate I figured might as well stay with Incra. The cost difference is about another router it seems.

I don't need a planer BUT could put the extra $$ to a rotary phase converter to finally power an old 16" Powermatic Planer I found.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Obiously from my previous posts, I am on the same page as Terry. The Incra Mast R lift along with the the Incra LS system is a great combination.

One thing I learned to do with the lift and the micro adjust feature is that of setting up and cutting miter lock joints.

I was never able to cut cross grain cut in a single pass so I did the following. The first step is to get the height of the bit correct. I have the gauges that some people use but because of vision problem they are hard for me to use and even when I used them the single pass on cross grain just didn't work for me. The material would chatter and buck so that a smooth cut was impssible.

In order to get the height of the bit correct I simple make a ball park practice cut and then using my dial calipers I can measure how far off center the cut is. I first mesure the thickness of the stock and divide by two to find where the center should be. Once I know that I use the calipers to determine where the center of the practice cut is. The center is where the male and female cuts meet. This measurement will tell how much the bit needs to raised or lowered in order to be correct and this adjustment is in thousandths. The accuracy of lift makes adjusting the final height of bit very simple and dead on.

Once that the bit is set the next step is to set the fence so that shallow cut are made. I make several of these shallow cut moving the fence just a little rearward after each cut until the final cut leaves a nice sharp edge at the top of the cut without reducing the width of the stock.

Next I zero the insert in the carriage that has the marks on it with the cursor so that I can, once again go to making my shallow cuts on the actual material being used in the project. I conting making the cuts and moving the fence rearward unto the cursor on the carriage is back to where the cursor on the carriage is on the previous zero mark.

This works for both the cuts with the material flat on the table as well as the ones with the stock flat against the fence for the opposing cut. The results have turned out to be perfect with no chattering during the cuts even with cross cutting in hard wood which was impossible for me earlier. The lift and micro adust used together makes this a simple endevor.

I will be the first to admit that the process could be accomplished without the llft and micro adjust but they do make the job so easy and fool proof, at least it works well for me and I like it. It took all of the frustration of using the miter lock bit for me.



Jerry
I'm saving that info Jerry, thanks! I picked up a new lock miter bit on ebay for cheap and decided since I got a deal on it, that I would spend the $$ on the Infinity Tools lock miter master jig. These tool/jigs were created by a guy on the Sawmill Creek Forum. Havent used them yet.

 
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