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Discussion Starter #1
Guys I realize this should be a no brainer but I'm not sure if I'm going to proceed properly.
Today when I drilled holes in aluminum flat channel , I first took a centre punch and hammered in a mark to guide my 1/8" drill and drilled right threw .
I then took a larger bit and set the depth on the drill press and counter sunk a hole following the 1/8" hole so a number 6 screw would be counter sunk .
Should I be using a regular counter sink bit that does this in one step or are they for wood only?
I have to say it's a little tight inside the T-track . They do provide a very small line in the centre as a guide for the holes though
 

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I've used the Snappy countersinks with no problem. But, it does sort of "polish" the edges of the t-track.
 

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I had to do the same thing, but had a countersink that would fit inside the track. Screws generally have a 45 degree bevel on the underside, and most drill bits don't have a 45 degree tip.
 

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Drill all the way through and bolt them in. Especially if you are using MDF.
 
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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Drill all the way through and bolt them in. Especially if you are using MDF.
Brad this isn't the miter slot but T-track . Pretty much stuck with counter sinking screws .
I could use my combo track and do just that though :)



I had to do the same thing, but had a countersink that would fit inside the track. Screws generally have a 45 degree bevel on the underside, and most drill bits don't have a 45 degree tip.
4D I was wondering the same thing , drill bits are not the same angle . Thanks



I've used the Snappy countersinks with no problem. But, it does sort of "polish" the edges of the t-track.
Thanks Roger
 

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I have seen it done on this forum. One of the CNC guys (makes a lot of signs) was constantly getting pull out and he bolted the T track as I described to the table to minimize this problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I have seen it done on this forum. One of the CNC guys (makes a lot of signs) was constantly getting pull out and he bolted the T track as I described to the table to minimize this problem.
Ok , for some reason I was visualizing the inside of the channel being obscured by the bolt ? I hate screws and prefer machine screws if possible . In this application there won't be much stress though
 

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Rick, have you done a test fit? I've found that in the tracks I've installed, a 1/4" 20 bolt head will pass over a button head screw in the track with no countersink.

Using a drill bit to make the countersink won't make a perfect machined fit to the screw, but it will help recess the screw head. After we discussed this previously I was able to find a proper countersink bit that would fit through the slot if nothing short of perfect will do for a shop jig.
 

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Rick, have you done a test fit? I've found that in the tracks I've installed, a 1/4" 20 bolt head will pass over a button head screw in the track with no countersink.

Using a drill bit to make the countersink won't make a perfect machined fit to the screw, but it will help recess the screw head. After we discussed this previously I was able to find a proper countersink bit that would fit through the slot if nothing short of perfect will do for a shop jig.
No never thought of a test fit as I wasn't aware that bolts could be used. To bad they don't have thin bolt tops as that would help too . I've seen them but I think it was at work and the cabinet has some special 1/4" bolts and the heads were not as deep as normal
 

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No never thought of a test fit as I wasn't aware that bolts could be used. To bad they don't have thin bolt tops as that would help too . I've seen them but I think it was at work and the cabinet has some special 1/4" bolts and the heads were not as deep as normal
Rick, some (if not most) T-tracks will accept a standard 1/4" 20 bolt head. The heads are almost twice as thick as T-bolts, but they fit fine, even over a button head screw securing the track. You can use T-bolts from the woodworking sites like Rockler etc. at about $1 each, or you can use 1/4 20 bolts (I recently bought 100 bolts on Amazon for about $15).

I posted a thread in May about a 'cool bit' that routes a T-slot that accepts a standard 1/4 20 bolt head (or nut), so for disposable fixtures you don't even need the track. Just route the slot and you're done!
 

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Can't you but counter sunk head machine screws?
 
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Can't you but counter sunk head machine screws?
James I suspect that's the best option , and when I install it someday I'll try that route .
If you see my wall shelves thread I just tried installing that dual track extrusion
 

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Rick, have you done a test fit? I've found that in the tracks I've installed, a 1/4" 20 bolt head will pass over a button head screw in the track with no countersink.

Using a drill bit to make the countersink won't make a perfect machined fit to the screw, but it will help recess the screw head. After we discussed this previously I was able to find a proper countersink bit that would fit through the slot if nothing short of perfect will do for a shop jig.
What countersink bit did you use?
 

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Guys I realize this should be a no brainer but I'm not sure if I'm going to proceed properly.
Today when I drilled holes in aluminum flat channel , I first took a centre punch and hammered in a mark to guide my 1/8" drill and drilled right threw .
I then took a larger bit and set the depth on the drill press and counter sunk a hole following the 1/8" hole so a number 6 screw would be counter sunk .
Should I be using a regular counter sink bit that does this in one step or are they for wood only?
I have to say it's a little tight inside the T-track . They do provide a very small line in the centre as a guide for the holes though
Rick, I read you should drill your countersink first. I tried it and it cuts out the chatter and makes it look better. I have been doing this in wood and aluminum.
 

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If you choose to just rout a T-track in your table, be sure to cut a 1/4" slot the same depth as the final T-track otherwise the slot cutter won't clear the chips well. I actually had the chips catch fire in my first T-slot cutting experiment.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)

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Welcome to the forum CMW^2.
 
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