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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I’m Michel82 owner of a new DeWalt DW625. My router says type 4, anybody care to enlighten me what's the difference between types, if any? Thanks.
 

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Usually just incremental upgrades, with some minor part changes. There's typically no noticeable difference between Types.

Welcome to the forum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi Gerry,

Thanks, glad to be here. I asked about the type 4 because after some googling I found that most results are for types 1-3. I am glad though that mine has the Guide Bushing (# 868151-00) that I think will readily accept any PC type brass guides. I will soon get myself a set of those guides, hope they fit, then make myself some homemade jigs. That’s a level up for me and a break from stone-age chisel work haha.

Cheers!
 

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Welcome, glad you decided to join the fun. That's a nice router, good choice. It will be interesting to see some of the projects you make using it.

Since you introduced yourself as new to this addiction (hobby) I thought I'd send along a pdf of the 17 things that helped me accelerate the learning curve. It's long, but has pictures and covers a lot of different areas. As you accumulate tools, it may help you avoid an expensive lesson or two. If you don't have dust collection yet, hope you're wearing a good mask, that sawdust is nasty to your lungs. There's a section in the pdf about that.

Stick has a number of really good pdfs on safe and best use of routers and should be along soon with a post. Those are well worth reading.

I think you've already found out that people here are pretty friendly and love to answer questions and make suggestions. They have lots of years of experience behind their advice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
pdf of 17 things

Welcome, glad you decided to join the fun. That's a nice router, good choice. It will be interesting to see some of the projects you make using it.

Since you introduced yourself as new to this addiction (hobby) I thought I'd send along a pdf of the 17 things that helped me accelerate the learning curve. It's long, but has pictures and covers a lot of different areas. As you accumulate tools, it may help you avoid an expensive lesson or two. If you don't have dust collection yet, hope you're wearing a good mask, that sawdust is nasty to your lungs. There's a section in the pdf about that.

Stick has a number of really good pdfs on safe and best use of routers and should be along soon with a post. Those are well worth reading.

I think you've already found out that people here are pretty friendly and love to answer questions and make suggestions. They have lots of years of experience behind their advice.
Hi Tom
Wow thank you, i’ll pm you.
 

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Hi Mitch and welcome. There are only two sizes of guide bushings sold after market and the vast majority are for the PC mount. You need a centering pin to set the base ring. Some routers come with them.
 
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Hello and welcome to the router forum,Mitch
 
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G'day Mitch, and welcome to the forum.
 
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Welcome to the forum Mitch.
 
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Welcome to the forum Mitch, the router is a great tool and very adaptable, you can really get creative with it!
 
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Welcome, Mitch...you're gonna love it here...
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
17 things by Tom

@Michel82 Forgot to attach the pdf. Here 'tis.
Very comprehensive, your material will definitely be a go to reference for me, a hobby woodworker. Per your recommendation, I got The Joint Book by Terrie Knoll. While I was at it, I also got the Workbenches book by Christopher Schwarz. Now, first things first, the hunt for a dedicated dust collection setup begins. Thank you so much Tom.
 

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Welcome to the Router Forums Mitch. Looking forward to seeing some of your work. Kepp us up to date on your dust collection setup.
 
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Hi Mitch. That pdf covers a lot of expensive lessons. Do check out the 2hp unit by Harbor Freight. If you don't get their print ads, sign up for them. Then look for a holiday issue, July 4 is likely, when they have the DC unit on sale, and often have a discount coupon on top of that. Makes an unbeatable combination. The bag filter on top is only adequate if it is outdoors. Too many find dust particles get through for it to be inside your shop or garage. It is on casters.

It works best with some kind of chip collector between the tool and DC intake. Rockler has the chip collector fittings you see in the picture below. I also put up a picture of the DC unit (with a Wynn canister filter on it. It comes with a bag. The chip collector is on a 30 gallon fiber drum I ordered from ULine. Rockler has the flexible tubing. I got the 27 ft. hose plus another 10 footer to connect everything up. Meanwhile, get a couple of simple dust masks. 3M makes a pretty good cheapie with a valve. For minor work, I just wear the medical type masks, which HF sells in boxes of 50.

The pix of the hand unit is an optional connector that fits on the end of the hose and will fit most 4 inch dust ports on tools. You can buy this with a 3 ft tube and a vacuum end for use on the floor. I really like being able to reach anywhere in the shop and clear out the random sawdust. The fourth pix is a Y connector that can be used under the router table. The 4 inh opening hold the hose and a box under the router, the smaller port goes up to a 2.5 port just behind the center of your router table fence. Stick with Rockler (or any other brand) for your connectors. 4 inches isn't 4 inches in all brands. HF has connectors, but not much variety, can't vouch for their quality or fit.
 

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Hi, your public profile is blank so I don't know whether you have other tools at this time. So I'm going to make a few suggestions for upcoming tool purchases assuming you don't have any of these tools.

First and foremost, a table saw. Once you have one, it becomes the center of your shop. There are many kinds of joints that require a table saw and a good blade or two. I was wathing seasons one through 3 of Woodsmith Shop on DVDs and realized they have simplified and focus on four tools. Router, of course, table saw, drill press and a band saw.

You'll always get this advice, always buy the best tool you can afford, even if it requires a little credit to move up. However, being real about budgets, give the Bosch 4100 - 10 inch jobsite saw. It gets top rating around here for a budget saw. Around $600 new. Add to that a Wixey digital angle finder to set the blade to a precise angle (90, 45, 22.5 degrees commonly. See pix.


I have and really like the bench model WEN 4214 12-Inch Variable Speed drill press. About $240 (less from some dealers), it is taller than the cheapo models in the big box stores, and you don't have to fiddle with changing belts around, it has a variable speed lever, and plenty of power. Interesting that it has exactly the same casting marks as the JET, which is far more expensive.

Rikon and WEN both sell the same small, 12 inch band saw. It is a bench model and comes with roller bearing blade guides. Very nice little saw. 72.5 inch blades are not expensive and you can resaw using the half inch blade if you feed the piece slowly. (Resaw means cutting thin strips from a wider piece.) I have a bigger band saw, but use the smaller Rikon far more often. I can't see any difference between the Rikon and WEN. They are identical. Cost is about $237 for the WEN, (https://www.amazon.com/s?k=WEN+band+saw&ref=nb_sb_noss_2) and about $300 for the Rikon. The WEN comes with a stand, the Rikon doesn't. Get half inch, quarter inch and 3/16th inch plades to cover all uses. 3 or 4 teeth per inch for the half inch, finer for the smaller. Take your time making cuts in thick pieces.

If you are using decent (many layers) of plywood or dimensional lumber from big box stores, you will be able to make a lot of things with these basic tools. You'll want to be very careful to avoid pieces with twists, bows or other distortions. I often use pine 1x4s I get from Home Depot. I pick each piece after carefully looking for the straightest, most know free pieces, that lay flat on the concrete floor when laid on both edges. Chech for twists by sighting down the length to see if the closest end is more or less parallel, if not, no thanks. Sometimes I'll buy a piece that lots of clear length, but maybe a foot or two that isn't.

A great first project is making your own router table, using a sheet of very flat ply. Lots of discussion of this on the Forums, just search and you'll find them.

Personally, I'd add a couple of additional items in my starter kit. A GOOD QUALITY set of four chisels and a course, medium and fine sharpening "stone", I now use a fine diamond stone. Watch some videos on preparing and sharpening your chisels. If budget is tight, you can use 150, 220, 400, 800 and even 1200 grit sandpaper to sharpen instead of the stone. But you'l need something very flat to mount them on, such as a really flat chunk of plate glass or even a large, smooth piece of floor tile. Check for flatness with a good straight edge (ruler).

Another tool is a small block plane. You want one with a low angle blade. Sharpening is similar to sharpening a chisel. It is a fast way to ease a sharp, easily damaged, edge. As you build projects such as boxes or drawers, you'll find yourself reaching for your block plane. see pix.

Get a good combination square. see pix. Mine is 70 years old, so it will outlive you, so don't go for a cheapie. Get one with engraved markings. There is often a level and hidden in the "handle" is a small spike for making scribe marks. You can get 6, 12 and 18 inches. A 12 is most common, but I like having the 6 inch to tuck into my apron. About $50 for both in decent quality.

Last on my list is a Grripper, a plastic safety device for use on the router or table saw. Keeps your hands safe, and allows you to apply pressure down, forward and toward the fence. Best basic safety device there is. See pix. About $60.

Pictures are in whatever order they appear. Pretty obvious.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Hi Tom,

I’ll be working on filling up my profile very soon so you and other very helpful forum members could better tailor advice for those of us new to this hobby. I just need to get my retirement paperwork in order and when I’m finally set free, it’s on to making worthwhile projects. How I wish I went down this path when I was a bit younger. Back in the day when Batman wore grey on a color TV and the show Six Million Dollar Man wasn’t about cash.

Right, so table saw. This was my first tool purchased for the hobby last year. Uncanny that it is the same exact tool which you recommend, a contractor Bosch 10”. I already tuned the replacement blade (a thin-kerf Freud industrial 50t combi) to align with the riving knife and fence perfectly. Well, almost perfectly because of the inherent deficiency of the flimsy fence. I do get by with only the slightest of misalignment, not by more than a few thou on short rips. I fitted in a Bosch plastic zero clearance insert and also bought extension aluminum extrusion front and rear rails to increase capacity to support workpieces on the left side. I haven’t the time to install the latter yet though.

What I made with this tool so far are shop furniture. A pipe clamp rack, a miter saw table (bare bones for now, cabinets can wait) & a modified Paulk Workbench. What a guy, Ron Paulk btw, he gives away his design in step-by-step fashion for just $10. For fastening those projects, I use the Kreg K5 and lots of titebond.

Thanks for the advise about a Wixey digital angle finder. It’s in my Amazon cart as I write this, together with a 3/4 spiral upcut bit as recommended by Paulk as I haven’t drilled the clamping holes on the table yet.

I have a 1/2 Hp drill press that needs to be torn down to get the bearings replaced. It’s a Taiwan made 1985 model that a mechanic friend gave me. Really solid looking with cast iron parts. I bought a 14 piece Forster bit set for it and that’s when I found out that the runout was unacceptable. I hope to resolve that after I put in new bearings, a balanced Chuck and a new drive belt. If, it’s not up to par then I’ll just use it as a spindle sander and consider the brands you suggested.

Ok, a bandsaw. That’s down the road for me. But I really appreciate the recommendations and the effort you took to impart knowledge Tom. I just YouTube my way through most of this and, well bandsaws seem to have a very steep learning curve from what I’ve watched. So, dimensional s4s for now.

Yes dimensional timber is anything but. It’s wood, no surprise. For that I have a Stanley type-11 no. 7 jointer which is a jewel of a tool destined for a Museum. I reach for my jackplanes more often though, a vintage Stanley no. 5-1/2 fitted with a 2 1/4” Hock 01 blade, a Record 5-1/2 (which I had cambered the blade to hog out wood), and another 2” Stanley no. 5. I also have a couple of decent Stanley no. 4’s - one is fitted with a IBC/Cosman A2 blade & breaker set, which is kinda overkill as the set almost weighs as much as the frog. Oh and block planes, I got those covered too. I subscribe to Patrick’s Leach’s monthly antique tool sale newsletter

Make my own router table you say? I need to YouTube that first and save the good vids for “watch later”. That is Number One on the 17 things!

Ok chisels, I have the Narex bench set from Amazon & their 4 piece mortising set too. Just because. I found the steel on these to be quite “soft”, unlike the two “white steel” Koyamaichi chisels which are just incredible. A few years back, B.C. (Before Chisels), I got into Japanese knives for slicing and dicing as I wanted something worthwhile to learn as I hunkered down the mundane task of prepping ingredients to cook family meals. That turned into a passion and really spiced things up, so to speak.

Coincidentally, the way you sharpen these knives is asymmetric. Bevel heavy on one side way more than the other. So as luck would have it, I already have a good degree of the skill set ready for hand sharpening woodworking tools. What a surprise! What’s more important though is that I already have many different kinds of Japanese whetstones just lying around. Debado coarse to medium grit, then for sharpening from 3000 grit up - Naniwa Chosera and then for polishing, a kitayama 8000 I have a Shapton for a mirror finish but I prefer to strop, as I do with my knives. I flatten these stones with an Atoma Economy #400 diamond plate which works up mud, and I refine the surface with the use a nagura or “correcting” stone.

From eBay I got a vintage Lufkin No. 4 Grad combi square for $31. Yes this one has engraved markings up to 1/64th, which I can barely see without spectacles. It’s a handy, fits in your apron 6” and was a steal at 31 bucks because it’s missing the scribe and has minor cosmetic pitting. I tested it for squareness at my friend’s shop. We didn’t find any discernible deviation from a machinist solid square. For scribing longer lines I just use a speed square or a roof framing square.

I got a Gripper last Black Friday for $53 if I recall correctly. Thanks for stressing it’s importance, plus its very easy to go through a cut as well because I think it makes it a snap to rest the work piece against the fence when you make the rip. DONT USE A TABLE SAW WITHOUT ONE... you don’t want to repeat a misaligned cut.

Thank you you all the advice. I wish you all the best.

Regards,
Mitch
 

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Thank you for all the advice. I wish you all the best.

Regards,
Mitch
You're welcome. You are really pretty far along in your knowledge and tool collection. Sounds like retirement will really liberate you for moving ahead with your skills. Looking forward to seeing your projects. You might take and post some pictures of your shop area.

A large band saw lets you resaw thick stock and liberates you from big box (warped) lumber. The small band saw is very handy for little cuts, rounding a corner, makng a small band saw box. Not a must though.

Only one more suggestion. I stopped using narrow kerf blades when I discovered they flex when making mitered corners for picture frames. Went to full kerf blades, specifically the Freud industrial glue line blade, which gives a perfectly smooth cut with a flat bottom. It also allows making dados and rabbet cuts easy without having to use a dado set.

I'm looking forward to seeing more from you.
 
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