Router Forums banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I've recently retired and enjoy working with wood. Currently fitting out a bedroom. I was looking for Router Tables when I came across your site. I have joined to discover what you guys are able to create, what tools you use which I hope will encourage me to have a go and keep me out of mischief! retired:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
766 Posts
Hello Vic,

Welcome to the Router Forums.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,494 Posts
Welcome
 

·
Official Greeter
Joined
·
19,118 Posts
G'day

Welcome to the router forum.

Thank you for joining us, Vic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,881 Posts
Ok, I'll bite. What is a "retiredsmiler?"

Hi, I've recently retired and enjoy working with wood. Currently fitting out a bedroom. I was looking for Router Tables when I came across your site. I have joined to discover what you guys are able to create, what tools you use which I hope will encourage me to have a go and keep me out of mischief! retired:)
Well, "retiredsmiler" there are 6 types of tables. Which one do you want to build?

1. standard horizontal table
2. torsion table
3. template/vertical table
4. ski table,
5. Pivot frame table
6. rounded table.

There are several threads on the forum with many examples of people's tables.

In short, you need a base that is appropriate to your shop. When you design the base, consider carefully what you're going to be building. My base is designed to roll around a small shop, hold some router bits and other parts and inventory a selection of routers. To that, I apply two of five tops as needed. I'm only using the horizontal table and the ski table at the moment. My torsion table is free standing.

Note, the rounded table comes from the wood sculpting world and I include it because it is a useful format for handicapped routerers (sp????) and readily available. Lee Valley sells an implementation for carvers that can be fitted with a router.

Once you've defined your table, consider the fences you'll be using:

1. "L" fence
2. Curtain fence
3. Dust Collection fence
4. vacuum mount fence
5. bar fences
6. high fence
7; pivot fence
8. split fence
9. Parallel fence

Before you get into router tables, though, you'll have to decide which philosophy you're going to adopt. Note adoption implies a lifelong commitment. It is worse than that. When you adopt a method, you're giving that manufacturer license to stick his hand in your pocket and remove copious amounts of cash when ever he wants. This is fine for the affluent set but for frugal types like me, it is a terrible inconvenience. There is one exception, OakPark/The Router Workshop. Their products are simple, elegant and can be purchased for less than a fortune or even shop built.

As you read through the fora you'll learn about the pros and cons of each. I use home made OakPark baseplates. Others use baseplates designed for use with router lifts. I grew up with a router lift - my arms and I figure I'm faster and more accurate than most store bought router lifts. If you want to see an extreme in a router table, there is a French routerologist named Champy who has built the extreme router table. Look for his profile and pictures of his creation.

HTH
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top