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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone tried Iron -On edge banding for plywood? I can't stand to have the edges of plywood show, so I've always cut strips of solid wood, glued them to the edges, and trimmed flush with laminate trimmer. I always knew there was iron-on banding available, but never really considered it. Now I see where I can get a 250 foot roll of red oak banding for $25. I'll spend several times that, plus a lot of time making 250 linear feet of banding. The task at hand is just a chest of drawers for shop tools, so it's a good place to experiment. My question is, does it stay on reliably??
 

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Yes. Absolutely, Andy; love it. I never use MDF so it's either solid edging or iron on; not a lot of other options...vinyl moulding is a bit 60's.
Either buy your own iron or be reeaaaaly careful that you check your wife's iron for residue when you're finished...she will not be impressed with glue on her $200 blouse. *lips are sealed!*
 

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yes, for decades...
just use an ordinary clothes iron set to DRY high heat...
a roller is a good bet when applying.....
if you get blisters/ripples no matter how careful you are... it is often the banding.. the cheap imported stuff does that...
Edgebanding Guide - A Simple Method Yields Superb Results
...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Just what I wanted to know! Thanks Y'all!
 

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Yes, would work for edge banding plywood carcasses, drawer fronts too, although I lean towards solid edging if it's going to see heavy/rough service. I've done enough of it that I bought one of the purpose made irons although, as mentioned, your wife's iron will work - just be sure to clean it thoroughly before returning. I never had much luck with rolling the banding, preferred to rub it with a softwood block with rounded edges as I felt I got a more even force - and I used the block to rub out laminate edging too.

There was a similar thread recently, talking more about trimming the edges - knife, razor blade, chisel, etc. - but I've always used the edge of a file the way I was taught by a gentleman who worked for a company that made institutional cabinets all his life. If you keep the file at a shallow angle and feed sideways as you stroke, the overhang can come off in a continuous curl, very quick once you get the hang of it.

If you think a heavier edging is preferable, I just read about a company on another forum that sell both the regular wood tape as well as heavier 1 mm, 2 mm and 3 mm thick product. I've never dealt with them and think you have to contact them for prices.

https://edgecoinc.com/veneer-wood-edge-banding-thick/
 

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I picked up an old iron at a garage sale and have it in the shop dedicated to edge banding.
Herb
I did the same, but found my iron in a re-store for $2, It works great for this, but doesn't get used much.

I prefer making solid wood strips and gluing them on. For a couple of recent cabinets using 3/4 birch cabinet ply that needed stain and poly finish, I made 3/4 X 3/4 soft maple strips and joined the cabinet sides at the cabinet corner into it using biscuits and glue. When trimmed and sanded, the soft maple grain and color was very close to the surface veneer of the cabinet birch. The soft maple has since been my preferred solid wood for covering cabinet birch end grain, even when as thin as 1/8" (without biscuits).

Charley
 

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It's OK for quick and dirty, but I by far prefer cutting strips, gluing them up , trimming smooth. The iron on doesn't improve the strength of a shelf, a good hardwood strip does. Glue thoroughly, I put 2 coats on the ply edge because it really soaks in. Clamp the strips in place same as you would glue up a panel. If I'm going for strength, the strip will be about 3/4 inch wide.

With iron on strips, you still have to trim the strips even with the ply. If the strips are solidly attached, then trimming can be done with a sharp block plane, or you can purchase a trimmer. I personally only have disasters trying to use a chisel or another blade. You can use a trim router as well. And as mentioned, I prefer to use a slightly rounded stick rather than a roller. Never tried applying glue first...I'd want to test that out on scrap first.

Man, you sure got that question answered thoroughly.

Oh yes, welcome to the Forum.
 

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are you letting the glue dry or are you sizing???
Let it dry. You need to fill the pores in the end grain otherwise there is only about 50% of the surface that the hot melt will stick to. I'm convinced that is why it has a tendency to want to let go a few years later. BTW, melamine glue does a great job of sticking it back on with some masking tape to hold in place. The only glue I use for bonding on the edges of ply, mdf, or particle board is melamine glue. It doesn't get sucked into the grain like regular wood glues do.
 
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cut by percentage or full strength???
 

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Full strength. Just spread it on reasonably smooth. If it doesn't look a little bit glossy then it needs another coat. Remember that both wood glue and hot melt are both plastics so heat will bond them together. Ply and mdf aren't usually a problem after one coat but particle board may need more. It's extremely porous. Porosity means voids and that means that there is noting for the hot melt glue to stick to unless you fill the voids. Or solid wood banding if you are doing that. When I put the solid wood banding on I usually put a coat of glue on then wait 5-10 minutes and add a another coat. I'd rather have excessive squeeze out than joint failure.
 

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what are you doing for excessive ''squeeze'' out???
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
All good info. Thanks Y'all!
 
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