Router Forums banner

21 - 31 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
813 Posts
Glue on edge banding, properly applied, works just fine. I find a clothes iron to be too bulky and you can buy a small iron from a hobby supply shop for about $25. It's used by hobbyist for ironing on the covering for model airplanes. I've actually used it for applying Ceconite covering on GA planes that we rebuild. Works great for getting into tight spaces.

P.S The file trick works well once the banding is cut close to it's final size and to get it there I have an edge band cutting tool that has a razor blade built into it. A little yellow plastic device that you just push along the edge. If you use the file and the edge banding is larger than the underlayment it can split the banding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
901 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
done yet???
Nope. I decided that the project at hand is so small that I can use scraps for solid wood edge banding and I won't have to worry about it coming off. Just got back from the wood store with some red oak for my drawer fronts, and the edges. But I may order some veneer banding for future use. And an iron to apply it with.
 
  • Like
Reactions: tomp913

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
yes, miles of it, and with that said, you might consider the peel and stick type.
https://www.fastcap.com/product/fastedge-peel-and-stick-edgebanding

It costs more per LF but I have had my students do time studies and even with a moderate hourly rate, in the end the peel and stick is much more cost effective. It goes on in a fraction of the time. Hence, peel and stick.
You can work with it right away but do need to wait 24 for full cure of the moisture cure adhesive.

On another note, the Festool perfect edge hand held edgebandor is really the way to go. I had a chance to demo this in Vegas and in Scotland and it is a game changer. here is a video I posted on FB about it .
https://www.facebook.com/scott.grove.587/videos/10156112320188777/

good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,475 Posts
Nope. I decided that the project at hand is so small that I can use scraps for solid wood edge banding and I won't have to worry about it coming off. Just got back from the wood store with some red oak for my drawer fronts, and the edges. But I may order some veneer banding for future use. And an iron to apply it with.
Most of my edge banding is made with scraps and cutoffs. Use the Rockler Thin Strip Guide to rip consistent thickness, sometimes think something like the jig in the attached .pdf may be quicker as you're not moving the fence for every pass - although it's limited on the length of strips that can realistically be ripped. I typically wipe on a thin coat of glue, let it dry for a few minutes and then apply another layer, rub the strip back and forth until the glue "grabs". For shop or painted cabinets, a pin nailer makes short work of assembly, otherwise I just use strips of painters tape. Getting ready to make up the drawer fronts for my router bit storage cabinet - making the fronts out of cut-offs of HD Sande plywood and the edging from poplar scraps, glue and pin nailed in place.

One thing to keep in mind when using either the iron-on or peel-and-stick, some finished may loosen the glue bond and affect adhesion - also a concern when using some of the "pre-glued" sheet veneers - this could be the reason for some of the failures. I don't think I've ever "sealed" the edge with glue before ironing on the tape, but most has been used with cabinet grade plywood - may consider that if I'm edging B-C fir though.
 

Attachments

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
what are you doing for excessive ''squeeze'' out???
Let it dry and shave it off. On melamine board that means laying a sharp chisel flat on the panel and shave it. On ply it depends on how hard it is. Sometimes a card scraper works well. If you were going to paint the banding then I suppose you could wipe it off with a damp rag but even if you were just going to varathane (no stain i.e.) you risk sealing some of the grain and causing it to look blotchy.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
I strongly recommend using melamine glue for applying the banding. Titebond - Product

It's the only glue I use when applying to particle board. It will bond melamine to melamine over small areas as the water has to escape for it to set and it can't do that over large areas. When I made my cupboards some years ago I wanted slide out shelves so I took some 5/8" melamine and rimmed it with 3/4" birch to essentially make shallow boxes. I rabbeted the bottom edges of the birch to 3/8" thick and glued and held them with 4 or 5 brad nails per side. About 30 to 45 minutes later I realized I had made a measuring error and needed to take the frames apart. I split several of the rabbets off trying to do that and I've been sold on melamine glue ever since then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,475 Posts
This thread is a couple years old now, but I remembered it when I saw the attached YouTube video showing how to trim the glue-on edge banding - exactly the way that I tried to describe it, except that I normally laid the part flat to keep the file almost horizontal as I feel that I have better control that way.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AMC8mFFrYlY&feature=youtu.be&utm_campaign=PWW%20Editorial%20Newsletters&utm_medium=email&_hsmi=94203490&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-8n738B_F2s381X6kdC7DDAp9c66BKZvN2Gj9w-3QS5rFVztA0HG54st5SoBsHW3XyG4D2xPQUKtcB1whWb3t0uqWZ2qQ&utm_content=94200640&utm_source=hs_email
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Wrap a layer of masking tape around the part of the file that you lay on the face of your work. That will give you a very slight bevel on the edge.
 
21 - 31 of 31 Posts
Top