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I was recently given an old "Delta Router/Shaper Model 43-505"......it's old, about 15 or 20 years old, but was only used 1 time. Literally, only 1 time.

We bought it for a particular job in our machine shop. We were making a special instrument panel for a chemical plant. We made maybe 6 cuts with it....finished the job.....then set it in the back of the shop. There it sat, all these years, collecting dust, until last week.

The boss and I made a deal.....I took it home and he was happy to see it go. The price was right! Was that a great deal, or what? LOL

I wasn't sure if it would even run. I plugged it in, flipped the switch and it purred beautifully. Everything is there except the wrenches. Guess I can't expect everything to be there for free. LOL

I've heard and read pros and cons on this unit. But since I've never owned a router table before, I'm gonna lean on the "pro" side of the argument.....for now.

Is there anything I need to be aware of....especially careful about.....when using this tool? I have the utmost respect for a router when it's in my hand.....and I will use the same care and caution with this tool as well. But what should I be extra careful about when using this? I do know I will be picking up....or making.....me a few starter pins.

While I have zero experience with a router table, I have a lot of experience with machine tools. I am a college degreed machinist with 37+ years experience in a machine shop. I'm not without skills.....but I'm not ashamed to ask for instructions either. That's why I have all of my fingers, my eyesight (for the most part I still do....I am old), and "most" of my hearing.....I mean, I was young and dumb so I did blare my car stereo a time or two in the past. LOL

Thanks in advance for any feedback and advice.
 

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Frank I think a handheld is inherently safer because you have your hands on the handles. That's probably the most important thing is to keep your hands far enough away from the cutter to be safe. Other than that don't trap the bit and always feed from the right direction.
 
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Frank I wish I had some input for you . I'm liking the sounds of this deal ,as in theory it's practically brand new .
Frank they were going to give me one heck of a deal at WP on a Shaper they had on the floor .
I darn near bought it , but fell over when I seen the price of the bits . In your case it was free , so the bits won't be as big a deal
 

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there's parts for that...
+1...
it purrs..
+2...
it'd really a router table..
+3...
price is right...
+4...
inserts obsolete...
-1...
looks like the + column wins...

here some tips...
\keep in mind it's a light weight...

.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys for the feedback. Stick, I appreciate the PDF files. Saved them for future refreshers.

First thing to do tomorrow is a good, thorough clean up of the tool. It is dusty and dirty. Then I'll do a real good evaluation of the router to make sure it's still good to go. I'm sure it is but I will make sure first.

I'm gonna duplicate some edge molding with it tomorrow. I have a sign to make using a "sentimental" board for a customer. I'm cutting the board down to size so I will have to re-cut the edge molding on 3 of the 4 sides. I was able to find an new router bit with an exact fit of the existing molding.....lucky me. It is a bearing guided bit so I will isolate the bearing across both fence faces and get as close to a zero clearance opening as I can get. That should help with the tear out.

To align both fences, I plan on using a piece of angle bracket clamped to each half of the fence. That will allow the entire fence to move as a single unit. Then I can isolate the bearing across both fences at once. At least that's my plans......gonna cut some sample pieces first.

Thanks again!!
 
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I have one that I bought when Lowes was clearing them out. It's quite powerful, but the table is too small, and I don't like the table grooves, but have lived with them. Before using it much remove the power switch and seal up the holes in the back side of it. I wrapped electrical tape around mine. If you don't do this, the switch will quickly fill up with fine sawdust and will quit working. It can be cleaned out, but it isn't easy to do, so keep it clean and sealed from the beginning.

I cut a hole in a piece of plywood the size of the metal table and mounted the unit in the middle, so as to add about 6" of table space to all four sides of it to have a larger work surface. I had also made a cabinet to use as a stand, but found it too awkward to move easily when mounted to this cabinet. I since just had a piece of plywood bolted to the bottom with a strip of wood attached so I can clamp it into one of my workmates and use the workmate as a stand for it.

You can quite likely buy new wrenches for it from any one of the online replacement parts sources like www.ereplacementparts. com.

I've used my router-shaper for quite a bit of work and it has performed very well for me. I've even done raised panels with it. It has a thermal cut-out built in, so it will shut off if you over heat it. If you do overheat it, just turn the power switch off and wait for it to cool down. It will run again after it cools. DAMHIKT

It's been my portable router table for about 15 years now. A 1/2" shaper spindle was available for it that fits into the 1/2" router collet and this may still be available, if you should want to use it with 1/2" shaper cutters, but I've always just stuck with router bits. The fence that came with it works, but it is far from fancy and I hate the slots and hold down design. I've been considering making a better and longer fence, but never have. A piece of stock and clamps is usually put to use when the provided fence isn't adequate enough. I did discover that a Porter Cable 1/4" collet and collet nut fit it exactly, so I now have both 1/4 and 1/2" size collets for mine.

Use it as you would a router table, taking all of the appropriate safety precautions that you would for a router table. I use a Grripper with the narrow side removed to ride against the fence as a pusher. I also have a small parts holding jig that I use with it frequently. The one that I have is the yellow one.

Lee Valley Tools - Small Parts Miter Jig

Another similar jig is

Rockler Small Piece Holder | Rockler Woodworking and Hardware

Add pieces of 80 grit peel and stick sand paper to the holding surfaces of whichever jig you buy so the jig holds onto your work better.

Charley
 

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Charley; could you laminate over the top of the existing table top? Maybe fill the slots first (wouldn't need to be fancy, just flat)?
 

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Yes, you probably could laminate over it, but then you would need to add some kind of spacer to the hole to raise the inserts to the new level. The grooves are a bit annoying, but I've lived with them since they aren't anywhere near as troublesome as one of those table saws with the webbed side table extensions. Don't be in a rush to cover them. Try using it for awhile and then decide if you need the surface flat and smooth. At one time I was considering either removing the top and having a friend machine it flat, or just make a completely new top about 24 X 36" out of plywood for it. The miter slot isn't the right width for standard 3/8 X 3/4" miter guides either, so along with replacing the top I was planning on installing an aluminum miter slot extrusion in the new wood top. I still might do this, someday.

Charley
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks Joe!! Appreciate the links!!
 
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follower prevents tearout.

as close to a zero clearance opening as I can get. That should help with the tear out....

Frank, a follower is an excellent way to prevent tearout. If you shove your end-grain through with another piece of wood (preferably clamped to it) there is no dead-air for the bit to push the object piece into (and split it).
 
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