Router Forums banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,428 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Guys is this the right bit to make your own T tracking slots with . Seems kinda narrow but it's all they have in stock in this town



 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,428 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Ok so is this the right bit?

Ok looking at the one from LeeValley its 9/16th . So this is to small . I'll order a couple from LeeValley
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,771 Posts
Measure the shank to see if it will cut at least a 1/4 inch slot. If not, I guess you could adjust your fence and make a second pass thus increasing the opening somewhat.

I have the Rockler version but only use it to make.....keyholes for hanging something on the wall.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,459 Posts
Here's the LV comparison for sizes and prices:

With the free shipping event, the LV ones are at least $5 less expensive.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,428 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Ok I'm ordering the LV ones . Thanks guys :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
It depends. If you are going to use the T bolts that would work but if you are going to use 1/4 inch bolts it may not. I use a number of bolts in T-track and tracks I have routed out myself and they are thicker than the specific bolts shown in the picture.

Also, some of the bits will rout the vertical shaft as well as the track. Some, including mine, do not. That requires a 3/8 inch slot cut first, then run the t-track bit through that slot. Two steps but not a hassle.

Good luck.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,428 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
It depends. If you are going to use the T bolts that would work but if you are going to use 1/4 inch bolts it may not. I use a number of bolts in T-track and tracks I have routed out myself and they are thicker than the specific bolts shown in the picture.

Also, some of the bits will rout the vertical shaft as well as the track. Some, including mine, do not. That requires a 3/8 inch slot cut first, then run the t-track bit through that slot. Two steps but not a hassle.

Good luck.
Good points ,thx
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
Rick,

I posted this thread showing a bit that will cut a slot that works perfectly with a common 1/4 20 bolt with a 7/16" hex head. It will also work with most 'toilet bolts'. Any bit that cuts a slot width over 1/2" will allow the hex head to turn, and less than 7/16" will not fit the cheaper 1/4 20 bolts. This bit was also pretty cheap at $13 through Amazon Prime. Good luck with whatever you choose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,954 Posts
Rick,

I posted this thread showing a bit that will cut a slot that works perfectly with a common 1/4 20 bolt with a 7/16" hex head. It will also work with most 'toilet bolts'. Any bit that cuts a slot width over 1/2" will allow the hex head to turn, and less than 7/16" will not fit the cheaper 1/4 20 bolts. This bit was also pretty cheap at $13 through Amazon Prime. Good luck with whatever you choose.
I like this bit it has a heavy throat and cuts a larger slot.

The bit you have will probably work ,like Jeff said you will have to run a wider slot first then use your bit to undercut the sides.

Herb
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
There are a few differences between them Rick. The keyhole bit is smaller and meant to be plunged and I don't think the slotwall bit is meant to be plunged. I would cut a groove on the TS first. Much easier on the router and the bit that way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
I have the keyhole one, I don't think it's suitable for cutting t-slots. I use it to cut slots at the back of picture and mirror frames so that they can be hung on a screw on a wall. It will plunge, and then you move it a short distance to create the hanging pocket.

JC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
487 Posts
If I am just cutting a T-slot on the back of a picture frame I use that bit. If I am going to make a T-slot in a longer board I use a 1/4" straight bit to remove some of the waste then use the T-slot bit. Malcolm / Kentucky USA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
813 Posts
Keep in mind that all slots are not created equal. The bit and T channel must be compatible. This is especially true on some of the smaller tools, jigs & etc. Standard cutters will work on most jigs & fixtures but if you were cutting a slot to add to an existing tool the slot & bit size needs to match the existing T channel. Just saying........ (can you tell I have made that mistake in the past?) Since many of the tools are coming from other countries "standard" seems to be an obsolete term.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top