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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
And all through the wood shop... All was quiet except clanking, groaning and wrenching.

My saw delivery was pending to be delivered between 12pm and 4pm. I had to go to the VA for 9:30am appointment for my yearly physical. Sharon stayed home, just in case I the delivery was before I got back. I gave her instructions on what to look for for damage.

I got home and there were the shipping cases in my driveway. I was excited. As I walked around to the back, I started getting a bit anxious as I noticed fork marks through the case. I asked Sharon if she noted those on the delivery. She thought those were handholds. Took pictures. Took the shipping container apart...

Luckily there was no damage. Forks went through. But that was a side where parts boxes were. So everything was far away from where the forks went through.

Unpacking and assembly was an adventure. I probably should have waited to borrow a cherry picker from Greg... But I didn't. I used straps under each leg and walked the half-ton saw off the pallet onto my pallet jack, then moved the saw on the pallet jack into the shop. During assembly, I had Sharon help me set the sliding table into place. I keep trying to ignore that I have a bad back. Heavy I can deal with (mostly), but along with being heavy, It is just too long and awkward for anyone to get set on there accurately on their own. You know I looked at the machine tag this morning. It says the machine weight is 365kg. I'm thinking that is just the base sysem. The bill of laiding said with everything that shipped in this order, it was over 1100 pounds. Lagune says the base saw without options is 1056 pounds.

I am ecstatic. It is together and tuned in. I'm sure I'll tune it in more later as I go.

Then I had to get some DC going initially to take care of the saw. Initially, I set up a manifold, which I have hoses coming from. It's sitting on my shop floor taking up space, but it is working for now.

I'm already thinking I need to move my RAS back towards the garage door so that I can move the table saw further in. Once I do that, I could move my MIG welder, oxy/acet, tanks, thickness planer and DC unit back. That would give Sharon more room for the laundry, me more winter room and the ability to move some of that outside in the summer when I'm working.

The 48" fence is tight in my shop. I ordered it, but isn't due until the rest of the order gets here in 2 to 2-1/2 months. Can't wait. Otis was right, I should have waited to get it all at once. I guess I can just appreciate it more now.

I'll write a review on it next week.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's great Mike!! Glad there was no damage. Speaking of taking pictures--can you post a few??

earl
I can't honestly say there was "no" damage... but everything was minor and acceptable.

I took pictures. They started a trouble ticket and were going to send things out for it. But I stopped the tech and told him what "I" wanted to do to make my own repairs... and he has compensated me well for doing so. Heck, I have skills and could probably do a better job and it's all done now (already). He was going to send me out a clip-on table and extension table, but those were already in my order. I settled on some of their spendee blades, a different kind of flip stop and some spare parts. They're even sending out touch-up paint.

Here's some pics (attached)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Explanation of / key to pic's:

Pic's 1-4. is the saw. Pic 1, I had to back up 1/3 into the driveway to get it all. It's a monster. Pic 4, you can see the rip fence and guide rail. That guide rail, manual says use 2 people to mount. It feels like about 80 pounds. See the main part of that rip fence (blackish-dark gray)? That is cast/machined cast iron... and weights more. The fence extrusion is 43-1/2". With that 48" crosscut fence, the saw is 110" wide. The sliding table is 66" long and total effective slide (stock) is 46" if you are scoring and 53" with a 12" blade. A bit more if you used a 10 blade or remounted the crosscut fence further back than stock.

Pic 5. I drilled and tapped new holes for the rear sliding table stop...

Pic 6. This is where the rear manual slide catch is. Release the catch and the table is supposed to go back further... But where the stop was, it only let the table go back another 3/8"... With where is "was" or with the table all the way forward, I couldn't change the main blade without putting the arbor down a couple inches (about where the arbor locking pin was at it's full reach). I could quickly see that this was going to be a problem when I went to put a dado on. So I moved the rear stop back until the front of table was even with the rear of the blade insert (9'back). Result? Look at the next 3 pic's.

Pic's 7-9. This is how far back the table will now go to change a blade. The slide stop still stops at the position at Pic 5... then you reach under the slide and release it and slide the table back to the slide stop. Now look at Pic 9. Their tech tried to tell me that that wasn't possible. That you couldn't mount the split scoring blades set with a 12" blade mounted... I can assure you there is plenty room there. (With a hair over 3-1/2" cutting depth!)

Pic 10. Is the main power panel. Main power is the big turn switch. Start and stop buttons for "power" to the selected motors. Small switch for the scorer. Main blade can turn on alone or both the main and the scorer. Main blade has to be selected for the scorer to come on. Emergency button cuts all. Another Emergency button on the right front.
 

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Congrats Mike, but I do have to say that looks like a lot of saw for the space you have it in.
 

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Glad to see that the saw finally arrived, Mike.

Now the fun really starts.......

Pity about the wait for the rest of the 'bits'.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Congrats Mike, but I do have to say that looks like a lot of saw for the space you have it in.
Thank you. I always said things were tight in my garage. Yes, I still have some shifting and moving around to do. Sharon was pondering if she wanted to sell her Wolfe Sun Bed. I grinned but didn't let on how much that would help me... She doesn't want to use it because it sucks up power big-time. But she is still attached to it. That would free up a whole lot of room!!!

I said in my last thread, if I moved my radial arm saw and moved my saw back to where that is... Then maybe I can also move my 250amp MIG (cart w/ 2 bottles), oxy/acet. welding tanks, thickness planer... That way, if there is good weather, they would be on the door side of the saw to move them out into the driveway. (Then if I had a carport....)

Also in there (besides many tool boxes and a generator) is a frig, 2 deep freezers, a washer, a dryer, the spare range (functional). The spare oven comes in handy when we make berry and apple pies a dozen at a time.
 

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Mike
The only I can say is
I am jealous
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Mike, that is an awesome saw! I've never seen a saw with two blades like that. What's it's purpose?
The scoring blade is split, meaning two blades. You set the width by shims to be just wider than the kerf of the main blade. You set the scoring height to .020"... about from there to 1/16"... As deep as you need to get through the surface or a veneer. The scoring blade spins rearward at about 6000 rpm. Since it is never set very deep, the blade stays sharp a long time. They take reshapening well. They are also precision blades and are spendee :(

The idea is that it scores through the bottom surface just barely wider than the main blade, which is turning the opposite direction... so when the main blade's teeth come through from top to bottom, there's no tear-out (the goal). The plus to this, is that you can run your blades longer and it appear with quality cuts, without tear-out, whereas without scoring, I'd be changing them out sooner at the first signs of tear-out, to be resharpened.

This works really well when cutting veneers and other laminated surfaced stock such as melamine. Great on mdf.

Another style scoring blade is with a tapered shaped tooth, where you set the width by adjusting the depth. The setting changes with wear and you have to keep on top of it. They don't take sharpenings well, but are still spendee. So between the two styles, I prefer the split style.

Also with the split style and with this saw, you can do dado's with scoring, by shimming the split scoring blade halves, so the outside edges are just barely wider than your dado.

I did my homework, lots of research and many months looking at saws. This has been, what, 2-3 years (longer for the saving for this). Large European panel saws have some of these features, but were 2-4 times as expensive and I just don't have the room for one of those 8-10 foot sliders). I looked at them and couldn't see me with one of them, even used. (Remember, I went to that commercial cabinet maker's / bank repo auction a while back?).

Even after I picked "this" saw, I still looked to make sure I was making the right decision. After all, things have been rough and this was a lot of money. With all the bells and whistles, this was around $8000. But this was an investment in me, for me. Woodworking, creating and building things helps me keep my head about me. It helps keep me sharp, to take pride in whatever I create... but also helps me to relieve stress. This was the only saw that fit all my personal requirements, plus more. It has room for "my" personal skills growth.

Sharon's litmus test = "Will it make you money?" It could... But with the disabilities now creeping in... I'm looking at possibly getting back into computer programming. So, it "might." But if not, it surely will be easier and fun getting the same (or better) quality I expect from my work, with less effort.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Just for PhilP

PhilP and I spent many hours talking saws and about this saw. Well... Actually, that's not as accurate as- We sent lots hours talking, which would return to subjects of saws from time to time... LOL. (He told me he would check back here...)

Phil, you will be proud... I forgot to mention, this saw does have motor brakes. Maybe not as agressive as a Felder or Altendorf, but within 1-2 seconds you can hear the brake come on... and the blades stop. Not suddenly, but they do stop. No freewheeling.
 

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Very nice saw mike and I wish that I had it here, not a lot of room to swing a sheet. Lee, The scribing blade is two blades that go together and they are a set where every second tooth is on the other saw blade half and set out, they are shimmed in between, and in the end then sometimes you have to make paper shims when the thinnest metal one is still too thick, so, they are shimmed so that that the scribing saw set when it is together is slightly thicker than the main blade and then the small saw shaft with the scribing blade is moved left or right until there is half the extra thickness on either side of the kerf from the main blade, the height of the scribing saw set is raised up until it cuts a small grove on the underside of the sheet being cut and this grove is cut before the main blade comes down with it's splitting cut and because the main blade is now coming down into a small grove that is just a very small amount wider than the cut being made by the main blade then there is "zero chipping on the underside of the sheet", and yes, the scribing blade does leave a very small rebate on the cut sheet but normally if the scribing set is set up correctly then that small rebate can be ignored, hence then need to get that set up 100% correct even if that does mean using a paper shim to get it that very little bit larger when it need to be a bit thicker but not that much thicker to mean that rebate would be an issue, you really cannot cut melamine or veneer sheets where the cut piece is seen on both sides without the help of a panel saw with scribing blades as it is not feasible to cut all your board over size and then use a router to get a clean edge, I spent many years on a panel saw like that, mostly larger than that one and with 12+ foot sliding table so, once the scribing blades are set up correctly then I never wanted anyone else to use the saw as the scribing setup was what I liked, now Mike I have to give you a very serious warning !!!!!!!

One of the most horrific saw accidents I ever saw came from scribing blades, the operator was used to sweeping his hands over the saw table to get rid of saw dust, this action became a normal part of his working day and he did it all the time without thinking about it, one day he swept his hand over the running scribing blades and cut 3mm off the inside of his right hand, the blood loss was massive and I think that his right hand was never the same again so don't ever forget that the scribing saws are wound up and running, teach yourself to hear the whine from the scribing saw set and always know if they are on or not on, keep your hands away from them as they are very hard to see. just a bit of friendly advice from NGM
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
On a SAFETY note, do I see a propane tank in your garage?
Actually, in those pictures, if you look closer, there are 7 tanks- 2 propane, 1 oxygen, 1 acetylene, 1 argon, 1 argon/CO2, 1 argon/CO2/O2. Oh... and coal.

Remember- I also do welding/fabrication, blacksmithing and ornamental forging. Various commercial welding and cutting systems, gas and coal forges. In the summer, I take out the propane tanks and store them in my utility. That is when there is a danger of them venting from being too hot. Right now, here, it's still in the mid-40's as a high.

I have fire extinguishers and fiberglass fire blankets. I am probably more fire aware than most, because I do expect it as a danger. Rather than others where the possibility of fire is an afterthought. But thank you for noticing.
 

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When my Craftsman saw grows up, it wants to be just like yours!!! Based on the story line the last few months and now the pics, I'd have to say it don't get much better! She should serve with distinction and outlast all of us!!!

Congrats Mike!!
 
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