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so use your router and a straight edge....

take your router w/ a flush trim bit (down shear is a plus) and dress the edge of the board...
no router.. I believe in Bosch 1617's....

now trim the opposing edge of the board parallel w/ your table saw that has a glue line blade in it...
I like Freud blades a lot...
no TS??? us your router and trim bit...

w/ a straight edge, (clamp on is easiest) your router and a trim bit you can be golden...
Freud Downshear Helix Flush Trim Router Bit - justfreud.com
Straight Edge Clamp from JustClamps.com

set the guide very near to the edge of the board, let the top bearing bit ride against the guide and the router on top of the guide...
you will cut/end up w/ a very clean/straight ready to glue 90° edge...
or....
set the guide back away from the board's edge and run the router it's self against the guide...
keep in mind you are only going/want to remove as little material as needed to ''clean/straighten'' the edge...
really screwed up edges are cleaned up (hogged) a lot easier easier w/ the straight guide and a circular saw and finished w/ the router...
now you can run the board through the table saw to make the opposing edge parallel...
strongly recommend a glue-line blade for this cut...
Freud Combination Saw Blades - justfreud.com
FWIW... don't waste your money on the Bora brand... VOE...

NOTE...
there is nothing stopping you from ''trimming/jointing'' your material upside down...
guide to the bottom..
router on top...
bit bearing against the guide.. (takes a bit w/ a bottom bearing)...
this works really well on narrow material..

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Discussion Starter #3
It's all too complicated for me, I'll go back to the jointer,after all this is it's main use!.
 
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use the alternate method a few times...
faster, easier, often more accurate and less wasteful than a jointer..
 

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I did this a lot before I got a jointer. I have a jig that uses a factory straight edge against the fence and has hold down clamps built in. I still use it to rescue really warped or trapezoid shaped raw lumber, or to take a bark area off. The problem with warped stock is that the forces that made it warp in the first place will make the rescued piece warp again, so you have to use it within a few days of straightening it.

Stick's recommendation of the Glue Line Freud blade is gold. If you don't have one, just get one. You'll love it.
 

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Tom, I'd agree with the exception of the choice of blade. My experience with Freud blades is abysmal. Actually, the router method is superior, anyway.
 

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I used one if those before in a factory I worked at. They had toggle clamps added to it to hold the board down. For long boards this is faster and more accurate than a jointer. The principle is the same as putting a log on a sawmill carriage and running it past the head saw.
 
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Tom, I'd agree with the exception of the choice of blade. My experience with Freud blades is abysmal. Actually, the router method is superior, anyway.
I still say it's your saw arbor...
 

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I used one if those before in a factory I worked at. They had toggle clamps added to it to hold the board down. For long boards this is faster and more accurate than a jointer. The principle is the same as putting a log on a sawmill carriage and running it past the head saw.
something like these???

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I still say it's your saw arbor...
Two table saws. Same results. The Tenryu produces a good cut, though.
Even so, a good spiral pattern bit is even better.
My jointer just gathers dust, now. I'd be glad to gift it to someone.
 

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@harrysin - the problem with using a jointer in this instance is the amount of curve in the board. If you put the convex side down, how are you going to reference the board to achieve a straight edge? The board will follow it's own curve on the bed of the jointer. If you put the convex side down, then you will need to have both ends of the board referencing off the jointer table. Using this method of attaching a straight edge referencing off the table saw fence is the easiest solution.
 

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@harrysin - the problem with using a jointer in this instance is the amount of curve in the board. If you put the convex side down, how are you going to reference the board to achieve a straight edge? The board will follow it's own curve on the bed of the jointer. If you put the convex side down, then you will need to have both ends of the board referencing off the jointer table. Using this method of attaching a straight edge referencing off the table saw fence is the easiest solution.
Vince , my thoughts exactly, only you said it better.I been scratching my head on how I would be able to do that on a jointer without clamping it to a straightedge, then might as well just do it in one pass on the TS.

HErb
 

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both really old Shopsmiths...
Not all that old. One is just 33 years old and the newer one is just 20. Both completely rehabbed less than 5 years ago. Mostly cosmetic stuff but, upgraded spindle bearings and belts. Great machines.
 

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Tom, I'd agree with the exception of the choice of blade. My experience with Freud blades is abysmal. Actually, the router method is superior, anyway.
It's not the cheapie brand, it's their industrial line. Does what it claims and lots of carbide for resharpening. Full Kerf too.

:smile:
 

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"both really old Shopsmiths..."

Who cares Stick, occasional reminders are not a bad thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Vince, after a number of passes you will have a flat reference edge. Believe me, I've been there and done that.
 
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Discussion Starter #20
My apologies Stick, having not read all all the new posts I assumed that you were referring to posts copied from various sources.
 
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