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Hello! New poster here!

I am looking to buy a Japanese handsaw for general woodworking use. I aim to build anything from a sturdy bench and heavy-duty woodworking table to small boxes. For my first Japanese handsaw, (which will handle the larger projects,) I am considering two very similar models. The difference I am seeing on the models is that one has more teeth per inch - which I think would be good for smoother cutting. However, the saw with wider-spaced teeth is more popular on Amazon and recommended by a woodworker. Is there something I am missing and is one saw superior?

Popular saw (155608)
Gyokucho 9-1/2" Double Edge (Ryoba) RazorSaw for Hardwoods from Japan Woodworker
Overall length: 23"; Crosscut teeth/inch: 14; Rip teeth/inch: 7

Saw I am leaning towards getting (155692)
Gyokucho 9-1/2" Double Edge (Ryoba) RazorSaw from Japan Woodworker
9 1/2" - Overall length: 23"; Crosscut teeth/inch: 22; Rip teeth/inch: 9 Handle 10 5/8"; Blade at widest 3 1/4"

The item numbers can be referenced under the Japan Woodworker catalog. I would post URLs but I do not have that access yet.

Is one saw more suited for cutting hard woods or have a smoother cut?

Thanks so much for any advice you have!

Sincerely,
-B
 

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Not sure what advice to give you on this one , Benjamin. I have a pull saw made by Irwin , which cuts very smoothly . You might take a look at the Samurai Carpenter's videos - he uses lots of Japanese saws
 

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Roger: Samurai Carpenter recommends the more popular saw. If the saws are almost the same, I'd rather have the finer-toothed one. More teeth = smoother cutting?

Danin Thanks for the welcome! And thanks for the link - I'll read up on what the PDF says.
 

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I have a few and never use one of my old push saws unless I need a longer blade. The coarse tooth one is the one you will most likely use the most and it will cut much finer than a standard north American push style saw. The fine tooth is good for cutting dovetails or molding but is significantly slower cutting. I have a relatively cheap one from Canadian Tire here in Canada that has both fine and coarse and it is actually a decent saw at about C$30. Canadian Tire is like Sears in that they don't manufacture anything they sell even if does have their name on it so it is likely available there by another name. As Dan suggested read the descriptions in Lee Valley's catalog as that will help inform you of what the various ones are good for.
 

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Rogerdodge Samurai Carpenter replied to my question:
"more teeth gives you a cleaner cut but cuts slower."

Cherryville Chuck I'd like my work to be very clean, but I don't want to take a year cutting. These saws are the same length (I will get a ripcut dovetail saw later) but one has more teeth. Do you think the difference will be very noticeable between these two 9 1/2" saws or will the smoothness/speed differences be negligible? I'm not familiar with Canadian Tire - I'll have to look that name up!
 

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Welcome to the forums BD...

if you use the @ symbol before the member's screen name it will give them a notification that you are posting directly to them...

like so.. @bdbailey...
 

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I have and love this saw ($30 on Amazon) https://www.amazon.com/Z-Saw-Dozuki...TF8&qid=1475769174&sr=8-1&keywords=dozuki+saw

It has replacable blades and a stiffener. I have a double edged model for flush trimming, but it is a little too flexible to use for fine cuts (at least for me). I use mine to trim off the splines at the corners of frames and boxes, and I think with the stiffener, it would be very good for cutting dovetails. It really does a nice job on thin pieces of trim, particularly if you have either a miter box or backer for the cut.

BTW, welcome to the party, don't mind the sawdust.
 

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Hey, BD; welcome!

I only have one, a fine tooth model which I seldom have the opportunity to actually use. Friends that have them swear by them, however.
What did Lee Valley have to say on the subject?

Lee Valley Tools - Online Catalog

pgs 46 - 47
Last year I bought the one on page 47 Item G #60T20.40 Modern Ryoba. All I can say is "WOW" This is unlike anything I have ever used. One side is Ripping, the other Crosscut. Once you get used to pulling instead of pushing you realize how much more control you have. At least I did.
This is just the basic beginners saw but very good. Incredibly smooth cuts. Let the saw do the work and it's like a hot knife in butter. Very timely. Just today I was browsing through Lee Valley and came away with the model Item H on page 47. It's the plywood saw. Just thought I'd like to have it handy.
In this outlet they've just got rid of the desks with order pads and clip boards and no more catalogues to read. It's all at eight computer stations now and takes some getting used to. There was nothing like flipping through a catalogue. Progress, yuck!!
 

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Ben one of the saws I'm very happy with is a Sharksaw brand. It allows replacing the blade when dull. It was about C$30 and the replacements are about C$20. I'm on my third one and that includes doing a little resharpening of my own with a file I bought from Lee Valley for that job. After 3 blades and a lot of use the handle is starting to wear a bit and may need replacing soon. It cuts way faster that the typical Disston or Simmonds. I bought it at Windsor Plywood and there are some of those in the states but I don't know how many or where.

I know you have no access to Canadian Tire but the point is that you may be able to find the same thing there under another name. Below is a picture of what it looks like. I use the coarse side for rough crosscuts and the fine side in conjunction with a miter box (usually) for cutting moldings. It will give you both saws for about C$30. It should say something about (impulse usually) hardened teeth to resist wear.
 

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Ben one of the saws I'm very happy with is a Sharksaw brand. It allows replacing the blade when dull. It was about C$30 and the replacements are about C$20. I'm on my third one and that includes doing a little resharpening of my own with a file I bought from Lee Valley for that job. After 3 blades and a lot of use the handle is starting to wear a bit and may need replacing soon. It cuts way faster that the typical Disston or Simmonds. I bought it at Windsor Plywood and there are some of those in the states but I don't know how many or where.

I know you have no access to Canadian Tire but the point is that you may be able to find the same thing there under another name. Below is a picture of what it looks like. I use the coarse side for rough crosscuts and the fine side in conjunction with a miter box (usually) for cutting moldings. It will give you both saws for about C$30. It should say something about (impulse usually) hardened teeth to resist wear.

...looks like the one I bought at Lowe's...same red button, blue handle...love it...
 
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I linked to the Lee Valley page and except for the writing on the blade and the texture on the handle it could be the Sharksaw brand LV has advertised. Since CT doesn't have any tool factories there is a good chance they are the same critter. And the same as yours Nick whatever brand it says it is.
 
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When there is a need for a hand saw I like the Japanese saws and I have two. I bought them from Lee Valley.
 
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