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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am absolutely certain that what I tried to do today is old hat to most of the members of our forum. I know that using the Incra Express Sled is still the best way to crosscut narrow workpieces, but, just wanted to try this to see how it would work. It is lot easier to set up than the sled and it works. See the attached photos to see what I'm talking about if you are courious.

Jerry
 

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I would have one concern about this design over a sled or using a spacer block on the front end of the fence. The first is that you would need to push the piece all the way past the blade to make sure it doesn't bind. When you get to the back of the blade the teeth are coming up and there is nothing holding the piece down. There is some risk of the piece getting tossed. Have you noticed if any of the pieces have rattled against the saw teeth as they were going past the blade?
 

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What Chuck said ... that is essentially trapping the piece between the fence and the blade. This is generally considered a no-no.

But the backing board looks like it does a pretty good job of keeping the cut piece square to the blade, so it is at least somewhat less likely to turn and cause a kickback.
 

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Chuck's right. I'd stop that practice before my luck ran out. Every time you trap a work piece between any cutter and a fence you should see a vision of a batting cage pitching machine hurling chunks of hard wood at your head.
 

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Jerry, was there not a similar post a month or so ago?

Not sure where you are going with this?
 

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Jerry, Eventually anyone doing this will have an injury of some kind - if you are really lucky it will only damage the workpiece, but more than likely you would get hit by a flying chunk(s) of wood. Another quite likely option is the do-it-yourself finger amputation! In the past when I've seen my helpers do this, I let them know in a very emphatic manner that is NEVER TO BE DONE!

When rip cut is made a long a fence, the longer workpieces have less tendency to skew slightly off-track than does a crosscut. With the crosscut, a teenie-weenie skew spells BIG PROBLEMS. Where you introduce the problem is at the friction against the fence.

(Cherryville) Chuck mentioned the stop-block nearest the infeed end of your fence. This is a method that we use * alot. Simply clamp a short stop-block to the infeed end of your fence - the protrusion SHOULD NOT be aligned with your blade tangent point - it should be closer to you. Use that stop-block as a reference point for multiple copies and if the workpiece is properly held-down - your workpiece is never exposed to fence friction simultaneously with being cut (friction ends prior to cut beginning). Many woodworkers literally wax their tablesaw tops and fences to minimize said friction.

* for crosscuts we most often go to the sliding compound miter saw. IN MY SHOP this is the better choice for boards up to about 16" wide.

Take care and be safe,
Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I would have one concern about this design over a sled or using a spacer block on the front end of the fence. The first is that you would need to push the piece all the way past the blade to make sure it doesn't bind. When you get to the back of the blade the teeth are coming up and there is nothing holding the piece down. There is some risk of the piece getting tossed. Have you noticed if any of the pieces have rattled against the saw teeth as they were going past the blade?
Charles,
You are correct in that you must push the piece all the way through and no there is no rattle. I cut a half a dozen cuts and they were all as close as I have learned to expect my cuts to be, They varied in length by .008", the length beteen the shortest and the longest. It was just something to play with and see would happen,

Jerry
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Jerry, was there not a similar post a month or so ago?

Not sure where you are going with this?
Earlier posts were not of the sub fence or backing block as is what this thread is about. I am, in this thread just looking for a way to make the cross cuts
on narrow pieces and at the same time be able to use the cursor and scale on the Incra system. When using a block to gain space between the fence and workpiece the length of the block has to be added to the setting on the scale, I guess that I am guilty of always trying to re-invent the wheel. Sorry if this disturbs you. I am pretty sure that you are always trying to be helpful.

Jerry
 

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I often use my very accurate rip fence to line up a cut with the miter, but always move the fence before the cut. This is not the fastest or best way to do things when you need multiple pieces of the same length but for a quick cut or two that just need to be close it works out fine and I don't have to set up the sled or set blocks.

But never ever ever use the fence and the miter at the same time. You could put your eye out with that thing kid ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I will heed the warning and go back to the old method of using the block or the sled. Thanks for all of your concerns about my safety and other members of the forum.

Jerry
 

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Hi Jerry, this is one of the first things I learned in high school shop class, never under any circumstances use the miter gauge with the fence. It is OK to clamp a block on the fence before the blade. You use it exactly the same way as others have said, but it cannot trap the wood because you are past it before you reach the blade.
 

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Oh Jerry. No it certainly does not disturb me.
 

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and at the same time be able to use the cursor and scale on the Incra system. When using a block to gain space between the fence and workpiece the length of the block has to be added to the setting on the scale said:
Try this Jerry. Build you a block that is 1 or even 2 inches square. Keep it handy and all you have to do is very simple math. Sometime adding them fractions can be a pain especially if its like 15/32.
 

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Jerry, what concerned me about what you did is that the free piece is not constrained in any way when it is cut off and there is no clearance between the blade, the free piece, and the fence. I sometimes see examples of members who have done relatively unsafe work methods for years with good results and no problems. In most cases, I think they have some idea of the risks and are prepared to deal with them. A newbie could look at that and try it and have a hobby ending disaster on the first try because they don't understand the risks. If I were to try that I would certainly make a point of standing off to one side and wearing eye, or better yet, face protection. The best policy is to think the job through before you start and use the safest method of doing it, even if it takes a little longer.
 
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