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A few years ago on the Router Workshop you featured building a stair case and had a jig for doing so. Where can I get the info to build this jig as I'm in the midst of building two sets of stairs.
Thanks so much for your help.
 

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49Hodge. You should be able to get a staircase router jig from almost any buildiers supplier.
I found one in a building supply discount catalogue in UK priced at £120 ($216)
It's the sort of jig that should last a lifetime unless used professionally every day when it will take a few knocks.
 

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49Hodge said:
A few years ago on the Router Workshop you featured building a stair case and had a jig for doing so. Where can I get the info to build this jig as I'm in the midst of building two sets of stairs.
Thanks so much for your help.
Working on this as a tip, hopefully I will have it posted soon.
 

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The two videos for routing stair frames were up on the woodworking channel in the Router Workshops section when I was there about half an our ago. Google Woodworking Channel, select videos, wait while it gets itself together, then look for a right arrow at the top of the WC display frame, click on this will give you more source options. Router Workshop is about the centre of the second set of sources, select them, and scroll through the titles.

James, there are no universal plans around to my knowledge as every stair setup needs to cater to the installation. Watching the videos will show you how to lay out the frames to suit, make a suitable jig, and do the routing one way, there are probably hundreds of different ways to achieve similar but different results.
 

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A few years ago on the Router Workshop you featured building a stair case and had a jig for doing so. Where can I get the info to build this jig as I'm in the midst of building two sets of stairs.
Thanks so much for your help.
check out some of mi pic i got some home made jigs
 

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As Dewy says there are commercially made jigs out there. In the UK the two Trend jigs are probably best known (one for open riser, the other for closed riser). These are also available in the USA and they are made from solid HPL (high pressure laminate, the sort of stuff they machine public toilet cubicles from). There are a number of low-cost alternatives such as these which are probably worth considering as their cost is so low it doesn't make much sense to make a jig IMHO. In the USA Delta/Porter-Cable used to make an excellent cast aluminium one which you still see from time to time on eBay.

The people who make these jigs use aluminium or phenolic/HPL because by its nature a stair jig needs to be very accurately made (the routing pattern on a closed riser is a pair of shallow tapers) but durable - even a single flight of stairs will require something like 28 cuts meaning that at the very least a good quality 16mm/5/8in birch plywood will be required. The other thing to note is that these jigs don't accommodate winders. For those you'll still need to set out by hand.

If you are still determined to make your own I'd suggest getting a good book on joinery, such as the ones colleges use to train apprentices, and study the section on stair construction. From that you will be able to ascertain the actual profile that your jig needs to produce
 

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Stair Jig

Hey guys, as a stair and handrail manufacturer all the purchased jigs only suit one style of wedge angle and tread overhang. I make several types, open stringers don't require a jig, just a square and a few brass stops and a steady hand on a skill saw for the 45 degree riser cut. For a curved stringer lay it out on a 1/8" piece of ply and transfer it to the stringer after it's bent. Here a few simple jigs for closed stringers, one for a 1 1/16" tread and one for a 1 1/2" tread. 6 degree wedge angle is what I use, but use what ever u want. Spruce treads I use a 1" overhang, solids 1 1/2", returns 1 1/2" from open stringer, and 1 1/2" past riser. For a closed curved stringer use 3/8" material for your jig, it's easy to form to the stringer for hand routing.

Of course all the stringers I produce are made on a large CNC machine, as are the jigs. I make them mainly for the guys doing side jobs and home use. Curved stringers can be pre routed then formed, but layout is paramount.
 

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Hi Joe

Can you please post some pictures of the jigs you have made would love to see a snapshot of two... :)


========

Hey guys, as a stair and handrail manufacturer all the purchased jigs only suit one style of wedge angle and tread overhang. I make several types, open stringers don't require a jig, just a square and a few brass stops and a steady hand on a skill saw for the 45 degree riser cut. For a curved stringer lay it out on a 1/8" piece of ply and transfer it to the stringer after it's bent. Here a few simple jigs for closed stringers, one for a 1 1/16" tread and one for a 1 1/2" tread. 6 degree wedge angle is what I use, but use what ever u want. Spruce treads I use a 1" overhang, solids 1 1/2", returns 1 1/2" from open stringer, and 1 1/2" past riser. For a closed curved stringer use 3/8" material for your jig, it's easy to form to the stringer for hand routing.

Of course all the stringers I produce are made on a large CNC machine, as are the jigs. I make them mainly for the guys doing side jobs and home use. Curved stringers can be pre routed then formed, but layout is paramount.
 

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i am not familiar with this jig, but i have to ask what it is used for, are you to route the 2x stringers, or are you looking to mortise the ends of the skirtboards to accept the ends of your treads?

That being said, i would not use a router for my stringer, use a circular saw with a new blade, otherwise you will be there all day and that kind of perfection isnt necessary especially since your stringers will be crowned etc....

now to route the ends of your treads into the skirt boards like a prebuilt application, if it is a straight stair, its easy. just layout your rise and run on a piece of plywood, i like 1/2 inch min, get a length long enough for 4 treads worth, then i pin nail 1x2 around where my treads will be, use a plunge router with a flush bit and route out where the tread will be, put a 1x2 cap on the plywood so it will hook onto your skirtboards, make sure it overhangs both sides so you can flip the jig over to route your left and right skirt. then after you route the first 4, slide your jig up the hill until the last routed is perfectly in line with the bottom of the jig, clamp it route 3 more, and back up the hill again.

i know this is a lot of explaining, and a pic would be worth a thousand words, but i dont have one, and all i can tell you is to get your jig perfect, if your staircase is 18 rises, and your 4 step jig is off 1/16th, your top step will be 1/4 inch off or more. good luck, i can take pics of the jig and the product if your interested. Chris
 

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YouTube - How to make the template for housed stringers
YouTube - How to make Housed stringer part3
YouTube - Housed stringer part 1
YouTube - How to build a Housed stringer part 2
YouTube - Housed stringer Part 4
YouTube - Housed stringer part 5


====

i am not familiar with this jig, but i have to ask what it is used for, are you to route the 2x stringers, or are you looking to mortise the ends of the skirtboards to accept the ends of your treads?

That being said, i would not use a router for my stringer, use a circular saw with a new blade, otherwise you will be there all day and that kind of perfection isnt necessary especially since your stringers will be crowned etc....

now to route the ends of your treads into the skirt boards like a prebuilt application, if it is a straight stair, its easy. just layout your rise and run on a piece of plywood, i like 1/2 inch min, get a length long enough for 4 treads worth, then i pin nail 1x2 around where my treads will be, use a plunge router with a flush bit and route out where the tread will be, put a 1x2 cap on the plywood so it will hook onto your skirtboards, make sure it overhangs both sides so you can flip the jig over to route your left and right skirt. then after you route the first 4, slide your jig up the hill until the last routed is perfectly in line with the bottom of the jig, clamp it route 3 more, and back up the hill again.

i know this is a lot of explaining, and a pic would be worth a thousand words, but i dont have one, and all i can tell you is to get your jig perfect, if your staircase is 18 rises, and your 4 step jig is off 1/16th, your top step will be 1/4 inch off or more. good luck, i can take pics of the jig and the product if your interested. Chris
 
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