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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently had a nasty jointer accident --

I'm looking for some different ways to joint with a router. I know you can do it on a router table, and I've done it before, but it's a bit cumbersome at times.

Anybody got a jig or router setup you like that makes the task faster/easier/safer?

Jason White
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Using a router to joint the edge is doable on a router using either a router table or handheld router.You Tube Video Except for a router sled for flattening/planning I don't know of a way to joint the wide side. An over the top/expensive sled
Yes, I’m thinking more for edge jointing. I’ll likely still use my jointer for face jointing.


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Rebel said
"Why are you buying rough lumber. You could buy finished lumber and not need a jointer in most cases... "
Is it me or is the quality of lumber going down while the price is going to Mars?
 

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I don't like to be critical, but why would you buy boards that have factory edges and are already dimensioned? I'm lucky to have a great local source of rough lumber, I can and have had them edge and dimension lumber for certain projects. No, I don't have all the fancy woodworking tools, just a few basic ones can get the job done quite nicely.
Take care all.....
 

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I don't like to be critical, but why would you buy boards that have factory edges and are already dimensioned? I'm lucky to have a great local source of rough lumber, I can and have had them edge and dimension lumber for certain projects. No, I don't have all the fancy woodworking tools, just a few basic ones can get the job done quite nicely.
Take care all.....
Why would I buy rough? We buy rough when it's necessary, but not for a majority of work.

I find no value in processing wood. I do find value in processing projects.
 

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I don't buy at a box store. I buy from cabinet supply companies. We have Liberty hardwoods and Paxton lumber company within an 30 minutes of me.

Mgmine.... where do the cabinet shops get there materials from around you?

All lumber come is rough at the warehouses. It's processed for free before I get it.
 

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I guess everyone is different with different goals. For me, part of the whole process is starting with rough lumber and seeing a finished product.
I would suppose some would say, you really need to cut down the tree, saw you're own lumber, and then complete your project.
Take care all......
 

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I made a router jointing fence out of MDF. On the infeed side I used a rabbeting bit to make 1/16 inch recess. I use a flush trim bit which makes it easier to dial in the fence position with a straight edge contacting the outfeed side of the fence and the bit bearing. The bearing should be raised above the surface of the piece being jointed. Knock off the edge of the fence opening on the outfeed side of the bit.
 

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You can use a router to joint a narrow edge close to the height of the bit. But use a half inch shank because there will be a lot of lateral force against it.

The key is to use a split fence with the outfeed side slightly (1/16th) forward of the infeed side. If the wood is bowed, you feed it with the tip of the U toward the fence. If you use the outside curve, you will simply reproduce the curve.

There are numerous advantages to using roughsawn material, including being able to resaw and plane to exact thickness. Having just priced a long precut chunk of Cherry, and as a hobbyist, I'll go for the roughsawn, thank you.

To start sizing a roughsawn piece, I'd start with a jig to hold it in position and run it through the table saw, using a glue line rip blade (Freud industrial brand, full kerf) to give it one straight edge. I happen to have a jointer so I'd index that straight edge to the fence and flatten one side (up to 6 inches wide). From there, I'd use a planer to get a parallel flat on top. Then the table saw to finalize width.

Or if I were going to resaw a 7/4 piece, I'd do the flat edge first for the base, and joint one side to reference the fence. And there are fairly simple jigs you can use with small wedge shaped shims you use to stabilize the rough cut as you pass it through a planer. This will give you a nice flat wide surface up to 12 inches wide. Then you can proceed to resawing. Or use the planer to flatten the other other wide surface.

There are many options for those who are not doing production work and have to mind their budgets. And there are a lot of us who enjoy the entire process and have time to indulge ourselves. Budget wise, do it yourself lumber milling might allow you to use a better roughsawn wood variety than buying something already dimensioned. And of course, not everyone lives within workable distance from a good mill. I'm lucky, my supplier is only 60 miles away, and I have a long bed pickup.

You most certainly can buy your lumber from lumber yards and get nice, straight dimensional lumber. But you can't expect to find more than one straight, unwarped, flat, not bowed or twisted piece out of any dozen you check.

For those who relish hand tools, a #6 or #7 jointing plane will also do the job. But get a good one and set it up carefully, including back flat and sharpening the iron. I have and love using a #6 WoodRiver V3 jointing plane. Sweet, but the motorized jointer is easier, and so is the planer sled for the wide stuff.
399301


Below is a picture of a planer sled: This is fancy and has a T track and clamp to hold it at the end. You can just use a small block attached at the end of the jig that's lower than the thickness of the piece you're working on. Make this jig as long as you are able, and be careful to feed it into the planer as level as you can. A roller support may be helpful.
399300

Here's a video of the table saw jig for cutting a straight edge.

I hope this is helpful.
 
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