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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Good day

I did try to make a glue joint on the router table with the 1/32" on the outfeed fence but it never worked for me.

So I went with something that is more "idiot proof" - straight edge.
Yes, it takes more time but, I'm an amateur and "time is not money"

The problem was the correct positioning of the straight edge, so I made small "positioning blocks" for 3/8" bit.

the example is made with Melamine boards.

Regards
niki


















































 

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Looks good niki

Just one more way to do it ▼

You may want to try one of Bob's and Rick's tricks :) for jointing to timbers.

Let me see if I get this right, put down a scrap board that you don't want then put the 1st. board down then put the 2nd board down so it will OVER Lap the 1st then put down a 3rd. board UNDER the 2nd. board then clamp the boards in place on the work bench then chuck up a carb. bit or good flush trim bit and make a pass on the 2nd. and the 1st. boards at the same time you can use a board for a guide but you don't need to the boards will match up right on the button.
Note***if you use a flush trim bit you will need a slot in the scrap board for the bearing to run in, but the flush bit will give you a real nice clean cut.

see the drawing below.

Bj :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you BJ

Very nice idea but, (why always there is this but)

The boards thickness that you see on the pictures is 1-3/16" (30mm) each and I don't know if I can find such a long bit to cover 2-3/8" [I have only 8mm (5/16") shank router].

BTW, the same idea (with small variation), can be used to make a glue line with the CS.

I'll keep the idea for the 3/4" boards.

niki
 

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You'er Welcome niki

Here's a bit that will do it, but it maybe time to get a bigger router :) like a 3 1/4HP.
Plus you can then use a router table just like a jointer on the edges of your stock.
And if you use a jig that Bob and Rick use all the time you will be amaze how neat they come out with just a pass or two on the router table,clean and true. :) :)
You can also use a 1/4" shank bit to do it on the router table but it's a bit hard on the skew/shear angle flush trim bit.
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see drawing below for the jointer fence below ▼

Bj :)

http://www.grizzly.com/products/C1014
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Shear Angle Flush Trim Bits
http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shop...rthtml/pages/bt_flush.html#shear_angle_anchor

Spiral Flush Trim Bit
http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/bt_solid.html




Bj :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Thank you BJ

Let me tell you some facts about me:
I live in Poland and from November to April, I'm on "vacation", impossible to work in the garage at temperatures close to the freezing point without heating and the car must be in the garage.

I'm an amateur and make 2 or 3 projects a year

The M12V costs here $600 (230V) comparing to $120 in USA

All the products here are in "Metric" so all the 1/4" and 1/2" bits will not fit

Even if the US company will agree to ship the product to Europe (for example, Amazon does not) the shipping costs will be added to the price and the local customs will want his share and on top of all this accumulated cost, I have to pay 22% VAT. Not only, but if something goes wrong, I actually don't have any guaranty on the product because the US company does not have a branch in EU.

I know that you are trying to help and I thank you for that but the reality...

Don't get me wrong, I'm happy with what I have and with what I can do with it, I'm just trying to keep my hobby as "hobby" and not to spend too much money if I can get around a problem with what I have, even if it "costs" me more time, and time is unlimited in my case (I'm retired).

On the pics, you can see one of my projects that I made with my limited equipment and no, I don't have Panel raising bit (nor the router to turn it).

Thanks again
niki
 

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Very nice job on the cabinets :)

You may want to enter the Contest see link below,who knows you just may win with cabinets like that, it's free to enter :)

http://www.routerforums.com/forum-contests/

Still just trying to help, check out the links below
(Metric router bits and routers ) at great a price. :)


http://stores.ebay.com/The-Hunter-T..._W0QQcolZ4QQdirZ1QQfsubZ5963140QQftidZ2QQtZkm
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...Sell_LogicX&refwidgettype=cross_promot_widget


Be sure to read the header about the VAT. :)


Bj :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi BJ

It's too complicated.
First the bit shanks are still Imperial only the bit dia is metric.(we use 6,8 or 12mm shanks)
The company is located in US.
The VAT is paid for UK but here I have to pay the local VAT of 22%.
The shipping is with UPS and we know their prices
What quality you can expect from a "no-name" bit that costs $3

For the time being, I have enough reserves of bits that I bought in Japan and if I shall need, I'll try to get it locally from some "brand".

When it comes to router bits or TS blades I'm buying good ones, as they say, "I'm too poor to by cheap"...

BTW, check this link, It's an Israeli company that one of the shops here told me that they are one of the best in the world
http://wpw.co.il/products.htm

About the contest, even if I'll win they will not send it to me because of the shipping price...

George
Thanks for the compliment but it's still "Amatorski" (Polish for Amateur)

Thanks
niki
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thank you Del

As I said in my reply to BJ, I live in Poland and the $40 will become at least $80 or more considering the shipping (if they ship), customs tax and 22% VAT.

I'm an amateur and I'm trying to save money on things that I can make myself or come around with an alternate methods. So even the $40 are expensive for me.

Here is a jig that I intend to make, it was invented long time ago by a person that passed away 5 years ago (at the age of 86) and it's for use on the router table with flush trim bit.

niki

 

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niki

I see you like to make your own jigs like I do and I know you said you can't get Amazon to ship to you but maybe you can have someone buy the items (books) below and send them to you, I do highly Recommend the BOOKS below :) :).

Woodworking with the Router
http://www.amazon.com/Woodworking-R..._bbs_sr_3/002-5788236-4980042?ie=UTF8&s=books

Router Magic
http://www.amazon.com/Router-magic-...=pd_bbs_1/002-5788236-4980042?ie=UTF8&s=books


They both have many jigs in them and cover routers from A to Z... :)

Bj :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you BJ

Interestingly, Amazon does ship books to all over the world, but only books.

I bought Bill Hylton's book some 10 years ago from Amazon and it's my "Bible"

At the same time I bought also Roy Sutton's "Jig making for the router", he is covering all the basic jigs including stairs building jig and all of them are the "mother" of simplicity.

niki
 

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I tried jointing with a router and a straight edge jig. The first board worked OK, but the second was a disaster. The router started ripping out chunks of wood and splintering the edge of the board. Here are the particulars:
Wood: poplar 7/8" thick
Bit: carbide, brand new 1/2 "straight bit, 1/2" shank, 1 1/2" cutting depth
Speed: 23,000 rpm
Depth of cut: 1/16"

Turns out I was going against the grain. Is that a no-no? Was I trying to move the router too fast? Would someone please try to tell me the error of my ways? Thanks.

I'd like to include pictures but don't know how to do it. Would some help me there? Again, thanks.
 

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Hi Falegname

You should be fine, sometimes you need to go against the grain but it's not the best way the norm :), I would suggest you to check the bit for damage..
Or maybe just sand off the 1/16" with your belt sander..

You can make a quick jig that holds the belt sander on it's side and a fence just like doing it on the router table or jointer...

Here's link to show you how to UPLOAD some pictures :)

http://www.routerforums.com/howattachment.php
http://www.routerforums.com/help.php


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Falegname said:
I tried jointing with a router and a straight edge jig. The first board worked OK, but the second was a disaster. The router started ripping out chunks of wood and splintering the edge of the board. Here are the particulars:
Wood: poplar 7/8" thick
Bit: carbide, brand new 1/2 "straight bit, 1/2" shank, 1 1/2" cutting depth
Speed: 23,000 rpm
Depth of cut: 1/16"

Turns out I was going against the grain. Is that a no-no? Was I trying to move the router too fast? Would someone please try to tell me the error of my ways? Thanks.

I'd like to include pictures but don't know how to do it. Would some help me there? Again, thanks.
 

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You'er Welocome James

Looks like it ,,the bit started to bounce around a bit then it dug it , you may want to recheck the jointer fence to see it's set right or moved just a bit after the 1st. pass...

Maybe take a lighter cut,,,,1/64" then try it one more time..then make a pass or two to get it just right.

=======
 

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This wasn't done on a jointer. It's a jig I found in Wood magazine. A straight edge fastened to a base; set back the distance from the edge of the router base to the edge of the bit. The workpiece is then clamped below the base. I left 1/16" exposed. The first one I did was fine. The bit was used twice: once to joint the edge of the plywood base and then to joint the first workpiece. Would a new carbide bit go bad that quickly? However I remember an old adage: "A good workman never blames his tools"
 

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Jointing with a router

Bob,
I went back and checked the bit, checked straight edge, and tried again on a piece of scrap; again against the grain with a 1/16" exposure. Only this time a lot more slowly. No problem this time. It looks like I was feeding way too fast. Ah, well. We live and learn; and make firewood as someone said. Thanks for your help and being a sounding board.
 

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Hi James

That's what I tough it was done with :) routers table can do a great job.

A new blade can go bad right off the bat,,,the cutting edge is very,very small.
Hardwoods can dull them in a heart beat.. :)

I know most say crank up the speed on small bits but I always keep the speed down, heat kills bits and speed = heat...the router will tell you if you are going to fast or to slow, it has a voice...:)

" "A good workman never blames his tools"" I bame the tool all the time , router bits are not all made the same,,, some good one and some bad ones, from the same Mfg. I call them made on a Fri.at 5:00 o'clock bits... :)

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